Tag Archives: Saviour God

Almighty God above all other gods greater than all gods


“In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.” (Genesis 1:1 RWebster)

“And when Abram was ninety and nine years old, the LORD appeared to Abram, and said to him, I [am] the Almighty God; walk before me, and be thou perfect. {perfect: or, upright, or, sincere}” (Genesis 17:1 RWebster)

“2 And God spoke to Moses, and said to him, I [am] the LORD: {the LORD: or, JEHOVAH} 3 And I appeared to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob, by [the name of] God Almighty, but by my name JEHOVAH was I not known to them.” (Exodus 6:2-3 RWebster)

“Who [is] like thee, O LORD, among the gods? who [is] like thee, glorious in holiness, fearful [in] praises, doing wonders? {gods: or, mighty ones?}” (Exodus 15:11 RWebster)

“Now I know that the LORD [is] greater than all gods: for in the thing in which they dealt proudly [he was] above them.” (Exodus 18:11 RWebster)

“And he said, Thou canst not see my face: for there shall no man see me, and live.” (Exodus 33:20 RWebster)

“4 ¶ Hear, O Israel: The LORD our God [is] one LORD: 5 And thou shalt love the LORD thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy might. 6 And these words, which I command thee this day, shall be in thy heart: 7 And thou shalt teach them diligently to thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou sittest in thy house, and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up. {teach: Heb. whet, or, sharpen} 8 And thou shalt bind them for a sign upon thy hand, and they shall be as frontlets between thy eyes. 9 And thou shalt write them upon the posts of thy house, and on thy gates.” (Deuteronomy 6:4-9 RWebster)

“Because I will proclaim the name of the LORD: ascribe ye greatness to our God.” (Deuteronomy 32:3 RWebster)

“Thine, O LORD, [is] the greatness, and the power, and the glory, and the victory, and the majesty: for all [that is] in the heaven and on the earth [is thine]; thine [is] the kingdom, O LORD, and thou art exalted as head above all.” (1 Chronicles 29:11 RWebster)

“And the house which I build [is] great: for great [is] our God above all gods.” (2 Chronicles 2:5 RWebster)

“Behold, God [is] great, and we know [him] not, neither can the number of his years be searched out.” (Job 36:26 RWebster)

“Be still, and know that I [am] God: I will be exalted among the heathen, I will be exalted in the earth.” (Psalms 46:10 RWebster)

“«A Song [and] Psalm for the sons of Korah.» Great [is] the LORD, and greatly to be praised in the city of our God, [in] the mountain of his holiness. {for: or, of}” (Psalms 48:1 RWebster)

“Thy righteousness also, O God, [is] very high, who hast done great things: O God, who [is] like thee!” (Psalms 71:19 RWebster)

“Blessed [be] the LORD God, the God of Israel, who only doeth wondrous things.” (Psalms 72:18 RWebster)

“That [men] may know that thou, whose name alone [is] JEHOVAH, [art] the most high over all the earth.” (Psalms 83:18 RWebster)

“Among the gods [there is] none like thee, O Lord; neither [are there any works] like thy works.” (Psalms 86:8 RWebster)

“For who in the heaven can be compared to the LORD? [who] among the sons of the mighty can be likened to the LORD?” (Psalms 89:6 RWebster)

“O LORD, how great are thy works! [and] thy thoughts are very deep.” (Psalms 92:5 RWebster)

“3 For the LORD [is] a great God, and a great King above all gods. 4 In his hand [are] the deep places of the earth: the strength of the hills [is] his also. {In…: Heb. In whose} {the strength…: or, the heights of the hills are his} 5 The sea [is] his, and he made it: and his hands formed the dry [land]. {The sea…: Heb. Whose the sea is} 6 O come, let us worship and bow down: let us kneel before the LORD our maker. 7 ¶ For he [is] our God; and we [are] the people of his pasture, and the sheep of his hand. To day if ye will hear his voice, 8 Harden not your heart, as in the provocation, [and] as [in] the day of temptation in the wilderness: {provocation: Heb. contention} 9 When your fathers tempted me, proved me, and saw my work.” (Psalms 95:3-9 RWebster)

“For thou, LORD, [art] high above all the earth: thou art exalted far above all gods.” (Psalms 97:9 RWebster)

“He sent redemption to his people: he hath commanded his covenant for ever: holy and reverend [is] his name.” (Psalms 111:9 RWebster)

“For I know that the LORD [is] great, and [that] our Lord [is] above all gods.” (Psalms 135:5 RWebster)

“Great [is] the LORD, and greatly to be praised; and his greatness [is] unsearchable. {and his…: Heb. and of his greatness there is no search}” (Psalms 145:3 RWebster)

“But the LORD of hosts shall be exalted in judgment, and God that is holy shall be sanctified in righteousness. {God…: or, the holy God: Heb. the God the holy}” (Isaiah 5:16 RWebster)

“And one cried to another, and said, Holy, holy, holy, [is] the LORD of hosts: the whole earth [is] full of his glory. {one…: Heb. this cried to this} {the whole…: Heb. his glory is the fulness of the whole earth}” (Isaiah 6:3 RWebster)

“Sanctify the LORD of hosts himself; and [let] him [be] your fear, and [let] him [be] your dread.” (Isaiah 8:13 RWebster)

“To whom then will ye liken God? or what likeness will ye compare him to?” (Isaiah 40:18 RWebster)

“I, [even] I, [am] the LORD; and besides me [there is] no saviour.” (Isaiah 43:11 RWebster)

“Fear ye not, neither be afraid: have not I told thee from that time, and have declared [it]? ye [are] even my witnesses. Is there a God besides me? verily, [there is] no God; I know not [any]. {God; I: Heb. rock, etc}” (Isaiah 44:8 RWebster)

“For thus saith the high and lofty One that inhabiteth eternity, whose name [is] Holy; I dwell in the high and holy [place], with him also [that is] of a contrite and humble spirit, to revive the spirit of the humble, and to revive the heart of the contrite ones.” (Isaiah 57:15 RWebster)

“Who would not fear thee, O King of nations? for to thee doth it appertain: forasmuch as among all the wise [men] of the nations, and in all their kingdoms, [there is] none like thee. {to…: or, it liketh thee}” (Jeremiah 10:7 RWebster)

“I will accept you with your sweet savour, when I bring you out from the people, and gather you out of the countries in which ye have been scattered; and I will be sanctified in you before the heathen. {sweet…: Heb. savour of rest}” (Ezekiel 20:41 RWebster)

“And I will sanctify my great name, which was profaned among the heathen, which ye have profaned in the midst of them; and the heathen shall know that I [am] the LORD, saith the Lord GOD, when I shall be sanctified in you before their eyes. {their: or, your}” (Ezekiel 36:23 RWebster)

“Thus will I magnify myself, and sanctify myself; and I will be known in the eyes of many nations, and they shall know that I [am] the LORD.” (Ezekiel 38:23 RWebster)

“The king answered to Daniel, and said, Of a truth [it is], that your God [is] the God of gods, and the Lord of kings, and a revealer of secrets, seeing thou couldest reveal this secret.” (Daniel 2:47 RWebster)

“And it shall come to pass, [that] whoever shall call on the name of the LORD shall be delivered: for in mount Zion and in Jerusalem shall be deliverance, as the LORD hath said, and in the remnant whom the LORD shall call.” (Joel 2:32 RWebster)

“For then will I turn to the people a pure language, that they may all call upon the name of the LORD, to serve him with one consent. {language: Heb. lip} {consent: Heb. shoulder}” (Zephaniah 3:9 RWebster)

“After this manner therefore pray ye: Our Father who art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name.” (Matthew 6:9 RWebster)

“And Jesus said to him, Why callest thou me good? [there is] none good but one, [that is], God.” (Mark 10:18 RWebster)

“For he that is mighty hath done to me great things; and holy [is] his name.” (Luke 1:49 RWebster)

“God [is] a Spirit: and they that worship him must worship [him] in spirit and in truth.” (John 4:24 RWebster)

“1  These words spoke Jesus, and lifted up his eyes to heaven, and said, Father, the hour is come; glorify thy Son, that thy Son also may glorify thee: 2 As thou hast given him power over all flesh, that he should give eternal life to as many as thou hast given him. 3 And this is life eternal, that they may know thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom thou hast sent.” (John 17:1-3 RWebster)

“I have manifested thy name to the men whom thou gavest to me out of the world: thine they were, and thou gavest them to me; and they have kept thy word.” (John 17:6 RWebster)

“25 O righteous Father, the world hath not known thee: but I have known thee, and these have known that thou hast sent me. 26 And I have declared to them thy name, and will declare [it]: that the love which thou hast loved me may be in them, and I in them.” (John 17:25-26 RWebster)

“And it shall come to pass, [that] whoever shall call on the name of the Lord shall be saved.” (Acts 2:21 RWebster)

“For the invisible things of him from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, [even] his eternal power and Godhead; so that they are without excuse: {so…: or, that they may be}” (Romans 1:20 RWebster)

“For whoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.” (Romans 10:13 RWebster)

“O the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God! how unsearchable [are] his judgments, and his ways past finding out!” (Romans 11:33 RWebster)

“4  Therefore as concerning the eating of those things that are offered in sacrifice to idols, we know that an idol [is] nothing in the world, and that [there is] no other God but one. 5 For though there are that are called gods, whether in heaven or upon earth, (as there are gods many, and lords many,) 6 Yet to us [there is but] one God, the Father, from whom [are] all things, and we in him; and one Lord Jesus Christ, by whom [are] all things, and we by him. {in: or, for}” (1 Corinthians 8:4-6 RWebster)

“According to the glorious gospel of the blessed God, which was committed to my trust.” (1 Timothy 1:11 RWebster)

“For [there is] one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus;” (1 Timothy 2:5 RWebster)

“For Christ hath not entered into the holy places made with hands, [which are] the figures of the true; but into heaven itself, now to appear in the presence of God for us:” (Hebrews 9:24 RWebster)

“And we have known and believed the love that God hath to us. God is love; and he that dwelleth in love dwelleth in God, and God in him.” (1 John 4:16 RWebster)

“And the four living beings had each of them six wings about [him]; and [they were] full of eyes within: and they rest not day and night, saying, Holy, holy, holy, Lord God Almighty, who was, and is, and is to come. {rest…: Gr. have no rest}” (Revelation 4:8 RWebster)

“Saying, We give thee thanks, O Lord God Almighty, who art, and wast, and art to come; because thou hast taken to thee thy great power, and hast reigned.” (Revelation 11:17 RWebster)

“And I heard another from the altar say, Even so, Lord God Almighty, true and righteous [are] thy judgments.” (Revelation 16:7 RWebster)

“Thy righteousness, O God, is very high, thou that doest great things: O God, who is like unto thee?” (Psalms 71:19 TRC)

“Blessed be the LORD God, even the God of Israel, which only doth wonderous things.” (Psalms 72:18 TRC)

“That they may know, that thou art alone, that thy name is the LORD, and that thou onely art the most highest {|hyest|} over all the earth.” (Psalms 83:18 TRC)

“Among the Gods {goddes} there is none like unto thee O Lord, there is not one that can do as thou doest.” (Psalms 86:8 TRC)

“For who is he among the clouds, that may be compared unto the LORD? Yea what is he among the gods, {goddes} that is like unto the LORD?” (Psalms 89:6 TRC)

“O LORD, how glorious are thy works, thy thoughts are very deep.” (Psalms 92:5 TRC)

“3 For the LORD is a great God, and a great King above all gods. {goddes} 4 In his hand are all the corners of the earth, and the strength of the hills is his also. 5 The sea is his, for he made it, and his hands prepared the dry land. 6 O come, let us worship and bow down ourselves: Let us kneel before the LORD our maker. 7  For he is our God: and {|<as for us>|} we are the people of his pasture, and the sheep of his hands. 8 Today if ye will hear his voice, harden not your hearts, as when ye provoked in the time of temptation in the wilderness. 9 Where your fathers tempted me, proved me, and saw my works.” (Psalms 95:3-9 TRC)

“For thou LORD art the most highest {|hyest|} over all the earth, thou art exalted far above all gods.” (Psalms 97:9 TRC)

“He sent redemption unto his people, he hath commanded his covenant for ever, holy and reverent is his name.” (Psalms 111:9 TRC)

“For I know that the LORD is great, and that our Lord {|LORDE|} is above all gods. {goddes}” (Psalms 135:5 TRC)

“Great is the LORD, and marvelous worthy to be praised, there is no end to his greatness.” (Psalms 145:3 TRC)

“But the LORD of Hosts, that holy God: shall be exalted and untouched, when he shall declare his equity and righteousness after this manner:” (Isaiah 5:16 TRC)

“They cried also each one to other on this manner: holy, holy, holy, is the LORD of Hosts. The whole world is full of his glory.” (Isaiah 6:3 TRC)

“but sanctify the LORD of Hosts, let him be your fear and dread.” (Isaiah 8:13 TRC)

“To whom then will ye liken God? or what similitude will ye set up unto him?” (Isaiah 40:18 TRC)

“I am only the LORD, and without me is there no Saviour.” (Isaiah 43:11 TRC)

“yea and that without any fear or stop. {stoppe} For have not I ever told you hitherto, and warned you? Ye can bear me record yourselves. Is there any God except me? or any maker, that I should not know him?” (Isaiah 44:8 TRC)

“For thus sayeth the high {|hie|} and excellent, even he that dwelleth in everlastingness, whose name is the holy one: I dwell high above and in the sanctuary, and with him also, that is of a contrite and humble spirit: that I may heal a troubled mind, and a contrite heart.” (Isaiah 57:15 TRC)

“Who would not fear thee? Or what King of the Gentiles would not obey thee? For among all the wise men of the Gentiles, and in all their kingdoms, there is none that may be likened unto thee.” (Jeremiah 10:7 TRC)

“I will accept your sweet savour, when I bring you from the nations, and gather you together out of the lands, wherein ye be scattered: that I may be hallowed in you before the Heathen.” (Ezekiel 20:41 TRC)

“Therefore, I will hallow my great name again, which among the Gentiles is evil spoken of: for ye yourselves have dishonoured it among them. And the Gentiles shall know, that I am the LORD, when I am honoured in you before their eyes, sayeth the Lord GOD. {|LORDE God|} {that the heathen may know that I am the LORD (saith the Lorde Iehouah) when I am sanctified upon you in their sight.}” (Ezekiel 36:23 TRC)

“Thus will I be magnified, honoured, and known among the Heathen: that they may be sure, how that I am the LORD.” (Ezekiel 38:23 TRC)

“The king answered Daniel, and said: Yea of a truth your God is a God above all gods, and Lord {|LORDE|} above all kings, and an opener of secrets: seeing thou canst discover this mystery.” (Daniel 2:47 TRC)

“And the time shall come: that whosoever calleth upon the name of the LORD, shall be saved. For upon the mount Sion and at Jerusalem, there shall be a salvation, like as the LORD hath promised: yea and among the other remnant, whom the LORD shall call.” (Joel 2:32 TRC)

“And then will I cleanse the lips of the people, that they may every each one call upon the name of the LORD, and serve him with one shoulder.” (Zephaniah 3:9 TRC)

“After this manner therefore pray ye. O our father, which art in heaven hallowed be thy name.” (Matthew 6:9 TRC)

“Jesus said to him: why callest thou me good? there is no man good but one, which is God.” (Mark 10:18 TRC)

“For he that is mighty hath done to me great things, and blessed {holy} is his name.” (Luke 1:49 TRC)

“God is a spirit, and they that worship him, must honour {worship} him, in spirit and verity. {trouth, or real fidelity of truth}” (John 4:24 TRC)

“1  These words spake Jesus and lift {lifted} up his eyes to heaven, and said: father the hour is come glorify thy son that thy son may glorify thee. 2 As thou hast given him power over all flesh, that he should give eternal life to as many as thou hast given him. 3 This is life eternal {|everlasting|} that they might know thee that only very God: {|that thou onely art the true God|} and whom thou hast sent Jesus Christ.” (John 17:1-3 TRC)

“I have declared thy name unto the men which thou gavest me out of the world. Thine they were, and thou gavest them me, and they have kept thy sayings. {|word|}” (John 17:6 TRC)

“25 O righteous father the very world hath not known thee: but I have known thee, and these have known that thou hast sent me. 26 And I have declared unto them thy name, and will declare it, that the love wherewith thou hast loved me, be in them, and that I be in them.” (John 17:25-26 TRC)

“And the time shall come {it shall be} that whosoever shall call on the name of the Lord, shall be saved.” (Acts 2:21 TRC)

“For {So that} his invisible things (that is to say, his eternal power and godhead) are understood and seen, by the works from the creation of the world. So that they are without excuse,” (Romans 1:20 TRC)

“For whosoever shall call on the name of the Lord shall be safe. {|saved|}” (Romans 10:13 TRC)

“O the deepness of the abundant wisdom and knowledge off God: how incomprehensible {unsearchable} are his judgements, and his ways unsearchable. {past finding out.}” (Romans 11:33 TRC)

“4  To speak of meat dedicated unto idols, we are sure that there is none idol {|So are we sure now concerning the meats offered unto Idols, that an Idol is nothing|} in the world: and that there is none other God but one. 5 And though there be that are called gods, whether in heaven or in earth (as there be gods many and lords many) 6 but {yet} unto us is there {but} one God, which is the father, of whom are all things, and we in him: and one Lord Jesus Christ, by whom are all things, and we by him.” (1 Corinthians 8:4-6 TRC)

“according to the glorious gospel of the holy God, {the gospell of the glory of the blessed God} which gospel {gospell} is committed unto me.” (1 Timothy 1:11 TRC)

“For there is one God, and one mediator between God and man, which is {|men, namely|} the man Christ Jesus,” (1 Timothy 2:5 TRC)

“For Christ is not entered into the holy places, that are made with hands, which are but similitudes of true things: but is entered into very heaven, for to appear now in the sight {|before the face|} of God for us.” (Hebrews 9:24 TRC)

“And we have known and believed the love that God hath to us. God is love, and he that dwelleth {abideth} in love dwelleth {abideth} in God, and God in him.” (1 John 4:16 TRC)

“And the four beasts had each one of them six wings about him, and they were full of eyes within. And they had no rest day neither night saying: Holy, holy, holy, Lord {|is the LORDE|} God almighty, which was, and is, and is to come.” (Revelation 4:8 TRC)

“saying: we give thee thanks Lord God omnipotent: {allmighty:} which art and wast, and art to come, for thou hast received thy great might, and hast reigned.” (Revelation 11:17 TRC)

“And I heard another out of the altar say: even so Lord God almighty, true and righteous are thy judgements.” (Revelation 16:7 TRC)

 

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Preceding:

Bible, helmet of salvation, God’s Words put in the mouth of prophets for perfecting, to reprove and correct

De Almachtige God der goden, groter dan en hoog verheven boven alle goden

Der Allmächtige Gott der Götter, größer und mächtiger als alle Götter

Dieu Puissant, Dieu unique des dieux plus grand que tous les dieux

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  1. El-Shaddai God Almighty Who no-one may see and live
  2. No man see the Almighty God and live
  3. The Almighty Lord God of gods King above all gods
English: psalms in Aramaic

Psalms in Aramaic (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Filed under Quotations from Holy Scriptures, Religious affairs

Easter: Origins in a pagan Christ

For many of the faithful, god-fearing Christians around the world, the resurrection of the Christ is central to that faith they hold so dear. Every year around March-April dramas are re-enacted commemorating the Passion, Death and Resurrection of Jesus put on by devotees as a form of renewal. Like everything else that goes with religious matters, most Xians are blissfully ignorant about the true origins of this, the central theme of their faith. Coloured eggs are given to friends and the bunny is the animal associated with Easter but little thought is spared for the study of the roots of these traditions and the relationship Xianity shares with the “pagan” world it forever disrespects.

 

Horus

Horus (Photo credit: waywuwei)

The truth of Easter’s origins is not helped by the decontextualised way many Eurocentric researchers analyse history. Most people who write about Easter trace the name to a Mother Goddess whose name in various European traditions was Astarte, Ishtar, Ashtoreth, Cybele, Demeter, Ceres, Aphrodite, Venus, and Freya. The name Easter derives from the Anglo-Saxon goddess of spring Eostre or Ostara. While these many rivers all contributed to the Easter celebrations, we should stop ignoring the African river from which they flowed.

Easter is an ancient spring solstice festival – the same spring solstice festival that gave us Carnival and Phagwa – involving the death and resurrection of the husband of the Great Earth Mother Goddess. This resurrection, far from being a miraculous historical event that occurred two thousand odd years ago, is a symbolic spiritual renewal that has its origins in the dim mists of the earliest human societies in Africa.

The Xian commemoration of Easter stems from this spiritual observance, only to be perverted into a myth of an historical death and resurrection of the biblical Jesus who then appoints a successor in the form of Peter. This myth was cleverly constructed for one purpose and one purpose only, the usurping and maintaining of political power. This point was well explored by Elaine Pagels and need not be dealt with here [see also the essay “Orthodox” Christianity and the birth of European Nationalism]

Xianity’s Easter, the resurrection of Christ Jesus is just a retelling of the Dramas of the Egyptian Yusir/Osiris and the Babylonian Bel, which in turn was a retelling of the symbolic death of the Great Mother of the primordial clan so that the community may survive. It is also bound up with the Nile Valley African’s concept of creation and their observations of the sun’s movements through various star constellations.

 

A statue of Isis nursing her son, housed in th...

A statue of Isis nursing her son, housed in the Louvre (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

According to the Egyptian account of creation only the primordial waters existed at first. Then Ra, the sun, came out of an egg (a flower, in some versions) that appeared on the surface of the water. Ra brought forth four children, the gods Shu and Geb and the goddesses Tefnut and Nut. Shu and Tefnut became the atmosphere. They stood on Geb, who became the earth, and raised up Nut, who became the sky. Ra ruled over all. Geb and Nut later had two sons, Set and Yusir/Osiris, and two daughters, Isis and Nephthys. Osiris succeeded Ra as king of the earth, helped by Isis, his sister-wife. Set, however, hated his brother, killed him and cut him up into 14 pieces. Isis finds and reassembles Yusir then embalmed her husband’s body with the help of the deity Anubis, who thus became the god of embalming. The powerful charms of Isis resurrected Osiris, who then ascended to sit at the side of the divine father Amen-Ra and who became king of the netherworld. Heru/Horus, who was the son of Osiris and Isis, later defeated Set in a great battle and became king of the earth.”

The parallels with the later Xian version are obvious. Indeed, in that short version of the story one can pick out the biblical concepts of the creation out of water, the warring twins, the Mother-Son consort, the death and resurrection of the saviour. Jesus was called the Christ, the Messiah; temporal kingly titles that came from “Karast” and “Messu”, the Egyptian titles for Yusir, Heru and Thoth. Among the ancient pre-Christian cultures, eggs symbolised creation, fertility, renewed life and resurrection. In ancient Egypt/Kemet and Persia during the spring festivals coloured eggs were eaten as part of the elaborate rituals in much the same way that they are being eaten today.

There are many traditions that involve the recreative power of the egg mostly related to the movement of the sun and stars across the heavens:

“As the sun climbed toward mid-day it was called Ra, great and strong. When the sun set in the west it was known as Atum the old man, or Horus on the horizon. As a solar-disk he was known as Aten. The sun was also said to be an egg laid daily by Geb, the ‘Great Cackler’ when he took the form of a goose.”

“Then there is the myth sometimes called the Birth and Flight of Horus. This tale, found in the Coffin Texts, is a combination of two stories. The first is the birth of Horus, and the second is a very old and fragmented myth that the sun burst out of an egg laid by a goose floating on the primordial waters before creation. The Birth and Flight of Horus begins just after Osiris’s death.”

Herodotus informs us that there was an annual festival in ancient Kemet/Egypt to commemorate the descent of King Rhampsinitus into the Underworld and his return to earth. Part of this ritual, apparently connected to the Yusirian Drama, was the enveloping of a priest in a shroud by two other priests, disguised as wolves. These two wolflike characters – portraying the divine guides of the dead – conducted the shrouded one to a temple of Auset/Isis outside the city where they left him. They would later return and lead the shrouded priest, who enacted the role of King Rhampsinitus, back into the city. On his return, the shrouded priest brought with him a napkin, supposedly given to him by Auset. Parts of this ceremony became the narrative in the Gospel of John where we read of visitors to Jesus’ tomb beholding a napkin and a shroud and two angels.

Then there is the Babylonian Drama of Bel; an ancient cuneiform tablet, now in the British Museum, produced about two thousand years before the Xian era, seems to have been used by Babylonian priests, one of whom acted as an announcer at the drama. John Jackson in his book “Man, God and Civilization”, mentions the works of Scottish scholar Arthur Findlay in which he relates the drama:

“The service would be started by the singing of a psalm similar to the Psalms of David in the Old Testament. Following one or more psalms, a priest would recite the appropriate prayer for the occasion. Then the announcer, holding a copy of the program, would arise and read out in a clear, loud voice

Scene I – “Bel is taken prisoner”

An actor representing Bel, the Babylonian Christ, was seen on the stage. Other actors dressed as soldiers would arrest the saviour-god. As the prisoner was led away by the squad of soldiers, the announcer again rose up and called out:

“Scene II – Bel is tried in the Hall of Justice”

At this point the scene of a trial is enacted. A judge was present, and witnesses testified for and against the prisoner, who was found innocent but sentenced to death anyway as in the similar case of Jesus in the Gospels. After the sentencing of the victim, the next scene was called out:

“Scene III – Bel is smitten”

This scene showed the jeering and baiting of the prisoner after the sentence of death had been passed. The next moment would be:

“Scene IV – Bel is led away to the mount”

The actor impersonating the victim was led away by guards to the sacred grove atop the hill. Then the announcing priest read:

“Scene V – With Bel are taken two malefactors, one of whom is released”

Actors representing the two criminals were seen on the stage and, after a trial, one was found guilty, the other innocent. The guilty victim was condemned to death and the innocent one released.

Although the death scene of saviour Bel was a part of the Babylonian Mysteries, this was not shown in the amphitheatre. This fact is explained by Arthur Findlay as follows:

The program does not contain a scene of the god’s death. This may be because it took place on a hill where he was hung on one of the trees in the sacred grove, or crucified, or slain on an altar, and so could not be enacted on the stage. By now, the theatre is empty and everyone has climbed to the top of the hill to witness the death scene. As the actor, taking the place of Bel, and the one representing the malefactor, are not actually killed, it may be that the death the saviour-god actually suffered was not enacted. This is unlikely and it is more probable that the tablet which has been found referred only to the performance in the amphitheatre, which accounts for the death scene not being included thereon. They were heavy and would not be brought away from the theatre. After the scene, when the two malefactors appeared and one was sent after Bel to be sacrificed, the people would know that, for the time being, the performance in the theatre was over. For that reason, and because the death scene was not taking place in the theatre, it is not engraved on the tablet.

After the death scene, the audience would return to the theatre and the announcer would declare:

“Scene VI – After Bel has gone to the mount, the city breaks into tumult”

in this scene the disorderly mob was shown rioting and screaming to exemplify the tumult that took place in the city. The next scene was then announced

“Scene VII – Bel’s clothes are carried away”

In this scene Bel’s body had returned from the mount and was seen on the stage by the multitude. His clothes were removed and his corpse was prepared for burial. The priest then announced the next act.

“Scene VIII – Bel goes down into the mount and disappears from life”

the stage being near the side of a hill, a tomb was dug and the body of Bel was placed therein. The announcement of the subsequent scene would be:

“Scene IX – A weeping woman seeks him at the gate of burial.”

The weeping woman, perhaps the mother, wife, or lover of the dead saviour, added a dramatic touch to this ancient mystery play. Then followed the climax, when the announcer read:

“Scene X – Bel is brought back to life”

The moving story of what happened in the last act of the Babylonian Passion Play and its effect on later religions has been vividly reconstructed by Arthur Findlay:

We can imagine the enthusiasm and excitement this announcement would cause. The people and there is thunderous noise and shouting. Then comes a hush and they reseat themselves awaiting in eager expectancy the denouement of this great drama. During the silence, the stone which has been pushed up against the tomb is seen to move and slowly it is pushed aside. Out of it comes Bel in his burial clothes. As he emerges from the tomb, the audience rises and shouts in its frenzy till all are hoarse. The great drama has reached its climax. Their god has re-appeared to them, death has been conquered, and he has secured for all life in the hereafter. As the actor could not re-appear as a spirit as did Bel after his sacrifice, the re-appearance had to be a physical one, just as the Christian drama depicts Jesus having left the tomb as a human being……This great religious service has never been forgotten. It was copied by the Greeks and is still performed in memory of Christ. It has been preserved for us throughout the Christian era in the four Gospels. The Christian dramatist made such changes in the details as were required so that people should believe that it was an historical event which happened in Jerusalem and that the actors were those who believed to have been disciples of Jesus.

This and the other dramas along the Nile Valley, bear testimony to the irrefutable fact that these mythical dramas and Passion Plays are of a much greater antiquity than Christianity. The Xian resurrected Jesus is only the resurrected Karast of the ancient Nile Valley. He was also the resurrected saviour of Persia, India, ancient America and a host of other cultures all well documented by John Jackson, Kersey Greaves, Rev CH Vail, Arthur Findlay and Godfrey Higgins.

The congregation in an Oriental Orthodox churc...

The congregation in an Oriental Orthodox church in India collects palm fronds for the Palm Sunday procession (the men of the congregation on the left of the sanctuary in the photo; the women of the congregation are collecting their fronds on the right of the sanctuary, outside the photo. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

We can now make sense of certain extra-religious Easter customs. The Easter Egg hunt, which is restricted to children, recalls part of the historian Plutarch’s narrative wherein he relates that it was children who told AST/Isis where to locate Yusir’s body. Thus, it is children who have the honour of searching for Yusir. The prize of the hunt, the Golden Egg is merely the great solar “Egg”, while the other prize, the silver egg is the full moon. Still another Easter tradition, eating hot cross buns evokes the celestial Mount Calvary upon which the “crossification” of the “sun” of god the very moment that its upward journey from the southern half of the celestial equator to the northern half separates it into two. Further, Palm Sunday, which commemorates Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem, his way strewn with palm leaves, in preparation of the Passover, can be interpreted in three ways:

 

  1. We can identify Jesus with the Kemetic/Egyptian Ra-Yiu, who as the Golden Ass, is a zootype of the sun
  2. It evokes the pre-Mosaic veneration of Ra-Yiu by the ancestors of the Israelites
  3. It symbolises Jesus’ power over Satan, who, in his original form as the evil Set, was depicted as an Ass. Remember that the name Satan itself comes from the Egyptian “Set-An”.

 

English: Palm Sunday in Sanok

Palm Sunday in Sanok (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Note also that in ancient Kemet/Egypt, the palm branch was viewed as a time symbol and its bifurcated leaves represented the equinox with its equal separation of day and night. The Palm Sunday procession then, symbolises Jesus the sun, Ra-Yiu, “passing over” the celestial equator on his ecliptic ascent at the equinox.

Further, because of the “wobble” created by the rotation of the earth around its axis, this event cannot take place at the exact time every year. This is why, with regard to the celebration of Easter the time varies from as early as March 22nd or as late as April 25th. In general, although not the strict rule, Easter is held on the Sunday after Pasach (Passover) which is usually the first Sunday after the first full moon of spring. It is actually the intentional Xian mis-keeping of Pasach for anti-Jewish purposes. Because Pasach is kept in accordance with a lunar-solar calendar rather than with a strictly solar calendar, Pasach will always occur on the full moon of the first Jewish month, which begins with the closest new moon to the vernal equinox (no earlier than March 10).

The Easter bunny or hare is another signpost to the celestial myths of pre-Christian Kemet. All over Africa the hare is a lunar animal because it never appears to close its eyes, making it a type of full moon. It’s also a zootype of Yusir/Osiris: as an animal that leaps up, it is identified with Yusir as he rises from the dead.

We have just glimpsed at the great antiquity and esoteric symbolism behind an event most of us simply took for granted. As always, it is not the intention to dismiss the bible and Xianity with simplistic views. It is about throwing light on a subject that for far too long has been simplified. In a subsequent essay we will examine the crucifixion from a slightly different perspective.

 

  • The Catholic Encyclopedia
  • The Encyclopedia Biblica
  • Tertullianus Against Marcion – Tertullian
  • History of Christianity
  • World’s Crucified Saviors – Rev C H Vail
  • Afrikan Origins of the Major World Religions – Prof. Yosef ben-Jochannan
  • African Origins of the Major “Western” Religions – Prof. Yosef ben-Jochannan
  • Holy Blood Holy Grail – Henry Lincoln, Michael Baigent
  • Messianic Legacy – Henry Lincoln, Michael Baigent
  • Echoes of the Old Darkland – Charles S. Finch MD
  • History of the First Council of Nice
  • Introduction to African Civilisations – John Jackson
  • Pagan Origins of the Christ Myth – John Jackson
  • Man, God and Civilisations – John Jackson
  • African Presence in Early Europe – edited by Dr. Ivan Van Sertima
  • Black Athena Vol. I – Martin Bernal
  • Ancient Egypt the Light of the World [2Vols.] – Gerald Massey
  • Gerald Massey’s Lectures – Gerald Massey
  • Dead Sea Scrolls Deception – Henry Lincoln
  • Who Is This King of Glory? A Critical Study of the Christus/Messiah Tradition — Alvin Boyd Kuhn
  • The Dictionary of Bible and Religion – editor William Gentz
  • Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire Vol. I – Edward Gibbon
  • Forgery in Christianity – Joseph Wheless
  • The Women’s Encyclopedia of Myth and Secrets – Barbara G. Walker
  • The Dark Side of Christian History – Helen Ellerbie
  • Women, Food and Sex in History –Soledad de Montalvo [4 vols.]
  • The Passover Plot – Hugh Schonfield
  • James; the Brother of Jesus – Robert Eisenman
  • The Gnostic Gospels – Elaine Pagels
  • Personal interviews with the late elder Clemey George
  • The Secret Relationship between Blacks and Jews – edited by the Nation of Islam
  • African presence in Early Asia – Runoku Rashidi
  • The World’s 16 Crucified Saviours – Kersey Greaves

By Corey Gilkes
From RaceandHistory.com

 

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Please do find to read:

 

  1. Eostre, Easter, White god, chocolate eggs, Easter bunnies and metaphorical resurrection
  2. High Holidays not only for Israel
  3. 14-15 Nisan and Easter
  4. Death of Christ on the day of preparation
  5. Seven days of Passover
  6. Altered to fit a Trinity or Ishtar the fertility goddess
  7. Peter Cottontail and a Bunny laying Eastereggs
  8. Risen With Him
  9. Creation of the earth out of something
  10. Tu B’Shvat, the holiday of the trees
  11. Ember and light the ransomed of Jehovah
  12. Because men choose to go their own way
  13. Taking care of mother earth

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  • The History and Origins of Easter (personalcreations.com)
    Easter, which celebrates the resurrection from the dead of Jesus Christ, is a holiday actually based on an ancient Pagan ritual. Unlike most holidays, Easter does not fall on the same set date each year. Instead, Christians in the West celebrate Easter on the first Sunday after the full moon of the vernal equinox on March 21. Therefore, Easter is celebrated each year between March 22 and April 25. The exact origins of Easter are unknown, but some sources believe that the word “Easter” is taken from the Teutonic goddess of fertility and spring – Eostre. Easter has also been traced to the Latin words Hebdomada Alba – meaning white week – referencing Easter week in which white clothing is worn by people who get baptized.
  • Does Christianity Have Pagan Roots? (Part 2) The Pagan Myth Myth… No, I’m Not Stuttering (godfromthemachineblog.wordpress.com)
    Superman at times would use his super breath and blow really hard and it produced powerful wind.  And at the end of the first Superman movie, the 1978 version with Christopher Reeve, when Lois Lane dies, Superman flies around the earth so fast in the opposite direction of the earth’s spin that he changes the direction of the earth’s rotation and literally rewinds time so he is able to rescue Lois Lane before she dies*.  Then, in the early 1990’s, DC Comics ran the storyline “The Death of Superman” where Superman was killed in a battle with Doomsday, but Superman returned after a long hiatus.
  • Ultimate Resource of Egyptian Gods (costumesupercenter.com)
    The major deities controlled the most important aspects of life and the lesser deities were in charge of specific duties, i.e, protecting the crops. As it was in ancient times, some groups still worship the gods and goddesses, one such being Isis, goddess of women and magic.
  • Does Christianity Have Pagan Roots? (Part 1) How Did “Easter” Originate? (godfromthemachineblog.wordpress.com)
    In one such blog article I read at this time last year, the author performed the most death-defying acrobatics I’ve ever read to attempt to show how Christianity is just a bootlegged copy of pagan religions.  The comments below the article praised the author’s brilliance.  One comment that stayed with me was a woman who unabashedly wrote: “There you go making sense again!”  Sadly, the article wasn’t just death-defying but logic- and history-defying too.
  • The Truth About Easter (politicsandthebible.wordpress.com)
    Easter is one of the biggest holidays in the Christian religion, along with Christmas and Good Friday.  However it is also has many myths and misconceptions surrounding it.  Some are honest mistakes and others are straight out lies.
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    If you remember the controversy surrounding The Da Vinci Code, part of the premise of the story was that much of the Christian faith was removed or added over time.  So much editing had occurred that there was very little evidence pointing to it except for a small circle of true believers who knew better and the hierarchy in the Vatican who didn’t want people to know the truth.  One date when much of this editing occurred is 325 AD, during the Council of Nicaea, which is when most skeptics believe the Bible was compiled and most of the major tenets of Christianity were added.  The problem with this is that the resurrection was very much a part of the religious creed for the 1st century Church.  Cornelius Tacitus, one of the best Roman historians of the 1st century, mentions in the 15th book of his Annals a “mischievous superstition” was held by “a class hated for abominations, called Christians.”  What could have this superstition been?  Jesus proclaiming to be God?  Well the emperors and several characters in Greco-Roman myths already did that, so nothing there that’s too outrageous.  That he did miracles?  The ancient world was full of miracle workers and performers of various wonders.  Jesus shouldn’t have even made it on the radar if that was the reason.  Could it be his resurrection?  That seems to be the only one that fits.  Tacitus was known for being skeptical of resurrection tales and the fact that people in a new religion with a deity that had died and rose again would have caught his attention particularly since Nero used them as a scapegoat.  Josephus, a contemporary Jewish historian, also mentions the resurrection as well.  “On the third day he appeared to them restored to life…”  Some have argued that this text has been tampered with, but it should be noted the Arabic version of the text also includes it but is over all less biased in tone.  Therefore we can be assured that Josephus did faithfully record the Christian belief of Christ’s resurrection.  Whether he believed it or not is up for debate.  And finally we have I Corinthian 15:1-11.  Often described as the first creed to be used by the Church, it adamantly recounts the death and resurrection of Christ.  Considering this epistle would have been written in the 40s or 50s AD, it is quite clear that the early Church believed in the resurrection since the beginning.
  • Did Christians really ‘steal’ Easter? (religion.blogs.cnn.com)
    Just because words in different languages sound the same doesn’t mean they are related. In Swedish, the word “kiss” means urine.

    But the biggest issue for Christians is the claim that Jesus’ resurrection – the faith’s central tenet – might have pagan roots.

    Even apart from whether or not Jesus actually rose from the dead, many Christians claim that the very idea is unique.

    There are other biblical examples of people being raised from the dead – think of Jesus raising Lazarus. But those people went on to die again. Only Jesus was raised from the dead to live forever.

  • Jesus vs Horus Myth…The True Facts (faithgracetorah.net)
    Everyday there are thousands, possibly hundreds of thousands if not millions of people trying to disprove the Bible and mystify the story of Jesus to where they will try to connect him to some other god of another culture such as the Egyptians. Other times, people don’t even try to connect him to another god, but rather they form pseudo comparisons with people such as Ceasar. But are these stories, myths, and comparisons true or is it just some pseudo scholarship gone viral?! Today I’d like to tackle one of these myths in particular: the Jesus – Horus connection.
  • Easter Tradition: Egg Hunt (historytalks.wordpress.com)
    The egg was a symbol of the rebirth of the earth in Pagan celebrations of spring and was adopted by early Christians as an Easter symbol of the resurrection of Jesus. The egg symbol was likened to the tomb from which Christ arose. Traditionally the game is associated with Easter and Easter eggs (Easter egg hunt), but it has also been popular with spring time birthday parties.

    At least since the 17th century the idea of the Easter Bunny to bring the Easter eggs has been known.

    The novelty of the introduction of Easter egg hunts into England is evidenced by A. E. Housman’s inaugural lecture as Professor of Latin at University College, London in 1892, in which he said, “In Germany at Easter time they hide coloured eggs about the house and garden that the children may amuse themselves in discovering them.”

  • Happy Easter (zodiaclivetarotreading.com)
    The term ‘Easter‘ is not of Christian origin. It is another form of Astarte, one of the titles of the Chaldean goddess and also it links to the pagan goddess Eostre (a.k.a. Eastre). She was the Great Mother Goddess of the Saxon people in Europe. Similarly, the “dawn goddess of fertility was known as Ostare, Eostre and Ausos. Similar Goddesses were known by other names in other cultures and were celebrated in the springtime. Some were:

    • Aphrodite, the Greek Goddess
    • Hathor from ancient Egypt;
    • Ostara a Norse GoddessEnhanced by Zemanta

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