Category Archives: Quotations or Citations

Carving a friend out of stone


”“Like a sculptor, if necessary,
carve a friend out of stone.
Realize that your inner sight is blind
and try to see a treasure in everyone.”
~ Rumi”

 

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Making itself worthy of happiness


“If the entire world sought to make itself worthy of happiness
rather than make itself happy,
then the entire world would be happy.”
~ Criss Jami
.”

 

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Play – a wonderful way for parents and children to get to know each other

“Play is a wonderful way for parents and children to get to know each other
– for children to learn about human relationships and for parents to learn about what is special and unique about each child.”
~

The LEGO Foundation

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Who is mastering who

In these times of pandemic lots of youngsters say their youth is taken away. Others complain that the government has taken control over their life and has limited their freedom. Some have become afraid that governments want to change their person and even go so far by manipulating their DNA.  There are really people who think it would be possible that governments could make robots of their citizens.

R.H. (Rusty) Foerger wrote already in 2015

Conscience and Ethics:

It is odd, isn’t it, that science needs to be reminded that it is a root in the word conscience; and that there is a need for morality in this field of study that gives rise to the Robot. There is even a discipline known as Roboethics, in which machines of artificial intelligence are also considered artificial moral agents (AMA’s).

The issue of morality and technology has been beckoning ever more forcefully since the Industrial Revolution began (if you are morality-phobic, then consider the notion of ethics). From Nobel’s Dynamite, to Oppenheimer’s Nuclear Bomb, to today’s misnomer: the smart bomb, there is a pricked conscience behind each failure of improved (?) technology. Thus Alan E. Lewis writes:

Modern science, judged by the fruit it bears, has thrown into sharp relief humanity’s fateful determination not to remain as creatures, conjoined in mutuality with all creation, but to be our own masterful creators…

… there is a cosmic wedge between… facts and values, allowing society to analyze, exploit, and control nature and its resources without reference to the spiritual meaning and moral consequences of its rapacity and heteronomy. {Artificial Intelligence: Conscience and Consciousness}

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Of further interest

Artificial Intelligence; the good or the bad?

What Everyone Must Know About Artifical Intelligence

Artificial Intelligence Vs Machine Learning Vs Deep Learning: What exactly is the difference ?

Heteronomy or Autonomy, You Choose

Unlived Life

Darkest sides of the artifical intelligence

Too much of a good thing can be a very bad thing: Technology’s Future>Why we must act now

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From the old box: Enemies of the people

Angela Nagel, The Baffler, March 2017

In her 2011 book Demonic, which explained how ‘the liberal mob is endangering America,’ Coulter praised the work of Gustave Le Bon, the first Frenchman to set about measuring the craniums of Nepalese peasants in an effort to lend pseudoscientific credence to elite European imperialist and economic projects. Le Bon’s influential 1895 book The Crowd drew admiring praise from Hitler and has been a reliable touchstone for misanthropes and eugenicists since. In fact, the whole anti-immigration discourse, marked recently by Trump’s ‘build the wall’ rallying cry, is steeped in the legacy of Le Bon and those who have always feared the teeming masses and the great unwashed, whether foreign or homegrown. Their alarmist outcries were typically first deployed upon the toiling white masses within Western societies, and then would find a new subject in new foreign ethnic minorities.

In both settings, the rhetoric is remarkably consistent: There are too many of them. They breed too much. They’ll swamp our limited resources. There isn’t enough room. They’ll destroy and vulgarize our culture. But what’s striking in our own new political order is how ideologically fungible such sentiments are becoming before our eyes. Put another way: if Hillary had won—or Brexit had been resoundingly voted down—we would be hearing more populism from the liberals and more misanthropy from the right.

More confusing still, in the web-native invective of the overtly white-separatist subculture of the new online right – the self-styled ‘alt-right’ -anyone who does not carry into adulthood the strangely adolescent impulse to distinguish herself from the hated mainstream of society is derisively called a Normie or a Basic Bitch, as though white separatism were an obscure punk genre. A common thread of masses-deriding misanthropy runs through the writing and rhetoric of the online white-nationalist right. Indeed, the longer you look at all the forces of reaction marshaled behind the billionaire president, the more opportunistic his populist turn seems.

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From the old box: Don’t tell me that working-class people can’t be articulate

Don’t tell me that working-class people can’t be articulate

Lisa McInerney, Guardian, 5 May 2017 wrote:

Last summer, about a year after my first novel The Glorious Heresies was published, I led a workshop for aspiring writers. In the session, we referred to my experience writing Heresies – lessons I’d learned or techniques I found useful. One of the attendees had read the book in preparation for the session and had an issue with my take on dialogue. He believed my characters’ speech, and each narrative voice I employed, was far too complex. He maintained that a writer writing a working-class story should not use sophisticated words or inventive phrasing, even in third person. He was adamant my vernacular wasn’t the vernacular: a working-class story should be told through simple prose and working-class characters should have a limited vocabulary, or else they are not authentic.

I was finishing the last round of edits of The Blood Miracles at the time, and so was (very sensibly) sensitive to criticism. I went back through the text, looking for phrases unsuited to its characters. Its protagonist, Ryan, is a 20-year-old drug dealer from a council estate who did not finish second-level education. He swears habitually and doesn’t make time to read. On that basis he sounds like the kind of young man most likely to communicate in grunts, but then, he has managed to make a comfortable living selling drugs, something that’s next to impossible if you can only express yourself through expectorating and blasphemy. Wait, I told myself. Cop on. The more I thought about it, the more indignant I became. Why shouldn’t Ryan be eloquent? Is eloquence not actually a necessity for disadvantaged dealers who don’t want to end up doing 10-year stretches, or quietly decomposing in some remote patch of Irish forestry?

Yet I’m sometimes asked if it’s terribly difficult writing dialogue for working-class characters because working-class people, particularly men, don’t converse. It’s galling the number of people who buy into this idea of class determining articulacy, a Blytonesque estimation that patois is intrinsically moronic and that the working classes communicate in dropped syllables, slang and scratching. That we are thick-tongued as Wuthering Heights’ Joseph, or stubbornly simple as Animal Farm’s Boxer, or as proud of our savagery as Lionel Asbo himself. I’ve seen people who should be angered by this theory subscribe to it instead, and how frustrating it is watching people react defensively to others’ knowledge – to the very idea of knowledge – without recognising their own.

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Part of an anthem About Peace on the hill


We have no control over the mongers
nor can we bring back the wrongful dead.
We cannot change a bomber’s mission
whose eyes and heart
have long been dead.

We cannot halt a crime in progress,
nor stop a public servant
from breaking his public’s back.
We can only watch a mob turned frenzied,
burning down stores of hard working people.
We cannot choose when the lines are drawn
nor order our neighbor to stand on our side.

We will become discouraged
and question our God,
for we are only human
emotional, mortal beings.
And the darkness is a heavy burden
a worthy opponent indeed.

But if we stand together
each shining an individual light
peaceful protest, speeches given,
solutions sought, hate amended
or however our gifts illuminate,
even when we tire or become weary
or the dreaded voices return…

As long as we remember,
no matter how dark it gets
if we continue to contribute
regardless of how meek it appears,
the next time, or the one after that
when the darkness sees its chance,
and starts to fall across the land
the light will be prepared for battle
and good will halt the march of evil.
allowing PEACE to overtake the land.

From: The Anthem: Even PEACE has a hill

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a Multidimensional document with layers of meaning

The Holy Word is a multidimensional document with layers of meaning that are abstracted from any involvement with time and space. These rarefied narratives transcend the spatio-temporal arena and describe events taking place in the psycho-scape of the human heart and mind. In other words, they refer to spiritual realities creatively concealed within our ordinary language.

~ The Second Coming Is NOW! by havau22

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Friendly February

Although we may be kept apart, we can still stay socially connected. This month we’re helping people to focus on their relationships. So let’s stay in touch, show friendship and be kind in these challenging times.
Campaign Graphic - Friendly February

We need each other more than ever right now! This month let’s focus on reaching out to connect with others and doing our best to be a good friend. Our acts of kindness and connection ripple out and impact so many more people than we realise – and they also boost our own happy hormones too! In stressful times people around us may be feeling the strain, so let’s try to keep calm, take time to listen and show compassion.

Green Line

February 2021 Small

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On the Anxiety of Non-Being


“The basic anxiety, the anxiety of a finite being about the threat of nonbeing,
cannot be eliminated. It belongs to existence itself.”

– Paul Tillich ‘

 

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