Category Archives: Nature

This is the time of the opening of the rose.

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Preceding article

(Poem) Endless Time

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Purplerays

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There comes a holy and transparent time
when every touch of beauty opens the heart to tears.
This is the time the beloved of heaven is brought tenderly on earth.
This is the time of the opening of the rose.

~ Rumi

Text & image source: Earthschool Harmony https://web.facebook.com/SpiritualQuotesandSoulfood/

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Filed under Nature, Pictures of the World, Poetry - Poems, Positive thoughts, Quotations or Citations, Re-Blogs and Great Blogs, Reflection Texts, Welfare matters

The twilight thickens, and…Leaves but a hallow’d memory of love!”

Portrait recadré de Lovecraft

Portrait recadré de Lovecraft (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A lovely poem by Howard Phillips Lovecraft (born August 20, 1890, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.—died March 15, 1937, Providence), American author of fantastic and macabre short novels and stories, one of the 20th-century masters of the Gothic tale of terror.

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Purplerays

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“The cloudless day is richer at its close;
A golden glory settles on the lea;
Soft, stealing shadows hint of cool repose
To mellowing landscape, and to calming sea.

And in that nobler, gentler, lovelier light,
The soul to sweeter, loftier bliss inclines;
Freed form the noonday glare, the favour’d sight
Increasing grace in earth and sky divines.
But ere the purest radiance crowns the green,
Or fairest lustre fills th’ expectant grove,
The twilight thickens, and the fleeting scene
Leaves but a hallow’d memory of love!”

― H.P. Lovecraft

Text & image source: Harmony https://web.facebook.com/Harmony-578149188866564/

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Shabbat Mevarchim opening to the Summer-holiday period

English: Members of Israeli summer youth progr...

Members of Israeli summer youth programs eCamp celebrating Shabbat. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It is nice that we do have longer days, Sun going under much later than in most part of they ear.

Tonight we are going into the Shabbat Mevarchim (“the Shabbat that blesses” the new month) when many all over the world shall recite a special prayer blessing the Rosh Chodesh (“Head of the Month”) of upcoming month of Tammuz, which falls on Shabbat and Sunday of next week.

We are thankful that the Most High Elohim beseeches to renew this period of time

“for life and for peace, for gladness and for joy, for deliverance and for consolation.”

Him giving us now the warmth of the sun, enabling us to enjoy the beauty of the flowers, shrubs and trees in their full glory.

After the students their examinations many shall be able to find a month of renewal of energy. From this week onwards one week after the other many people shall go on holiday, either staying at home to take some rest away from work or to go at some place to enjoy themselves, seeing other cultures or just to enjoy themselves on a beach or in the mountains.

Though we may mourn over the destruction of the Holy Temple and the breakdown in our relationship with God that this represents, we may find now some more time to take our bible to study in it. Having not to go to work for some days or weeks we not only have some more leisure time, but should find extra time to study God‘s Word.

This Sabbath we may find the opening to a period of meditation, contemplation and letting our mind and body recover from the stress at work and from the daily worries. It is the start to a period of being grateful for the blessings we receive from our Divine Maker, Him making it possible to earn our money for making daily living not to difficult. At the same time, it is also the Sabbath that “blesses” and calls forth the qualities of the coming weeks characterized by extra quality time to get in intimacy with God.

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Preceding articles

Summermonths and consumerism

Holiday making and dreaming

Going on holiday is… silence in your head

Home-stayers and their to do list

2016 Summer holiday

Allow yourself a chill-out day

Holiday time reading time

Family happiness and little things we do

Luxury

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Additional reading

  1. Holiday tolerance
  2. Self-development, self-control, meditation, beliefs and spirituality

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Filed under Being and Feeling, Health affairs, Lifestyle, Nature, Reflection Texts, Religious affairs, Welfare matters, Wereld aangelegenheden

A look at On Science & Religion

Science discovers and defines what has been observed. On the basis of such research, theories are devised to explain the facts, and ‘laws’ developed to identify commonly occurring activity. These ‘laws’ are accepted as true and factual until proved false, at which time new ‘laws’ are devised. Science works from observable facts to generate knowledge and understanding.

16th-century Painting of the Triumph of Christ...

16th-century Painting of the Triumph of Christian religion by Tommaso Laureti in the Room of Constantine of the Raphael Rooms, Vaticano. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Religion, on the other hand, is belief in and worship of a God or gods. It demands ‘faith’ in the message and in the messenger. Religion does not exist in a vacuum; it is built upon the accumulated wisdom and knowledge of others. The Christian religion is built upon acceptance of literature that describes the life of its founder, Jesus Christ, his moral teaching and the social, historical context of his life and work. While external evidence can help to evidence the validity of religion, religion does not depend on external evidence to prove or disprove its critical statements.

 

Science is an extremely helpful activity, providing many of the benefits of our modern world. We should respect the findings of such research and be grateful for it. If scientific understanding helps to enrich our sense of awe at the amazing universe or assists us in understanding the complexities of a microscopic world, then so be it. But let us not put scientific research in opposition to Bible teaching; the two are fundamentally different. Science may help us to understand the Bible but I doubt whether it works the other way round!

> Please continue reading at: On Science & Religion

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Intelligent design Not chance > Flight of birds – Feathers

Wing feathers and bones

Wing feathers and bones (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

-Feathers: As well as the general streamlining and aerodynamic qualities of birds and aerofoil wing design, the feathers of birds are all important for effi­ciency in flight and accuracy of navigational movement through the air. Every movement of a feather when a bird is in flight is designed to extract energy from the air and utilise it effectively for control of the aerial medium through which it passes, as well as providing insulation, acting as fans, and contributing to the aerodynamic streamlining of the wonderful creature.

For their weight feathers are stronger than any man made substitute. A bird individually has literally thousands of feathers of different types, generally fluffy underneath (for warmth) and more sail-like above. For example a hen may have more than 8,300, a swan over 25,000 feathers! Eider ducks produce thousands of feathers, which are so soft and fluffy that they are used for eider downs and stuffing pillars.

The construction of feathers is a marvel of design. A single wing feather of a pigeon has more than a million individual parts, which testifies to its phenomenal micro engineering design. There is a central rachis or hollow, foam filled, spine or quill, from which arise barbs and from these barbules which zip together with minute hooks (hamuli). These feathers are kept in perfect order by the bird constantly preening its feathers. The feathers respond to air pressure and change shape constantly in relation to the changing pressure and air flow.

Flight feathers at the wing tip are flexible and mobile like a propellor and respond to flight patterns in movements, speed, landing and braking speed, gliding (called slotting). Other feathers function like like ailerons and flaps in an aircraft.

How could all this marvellous engineering design happen by chance? This is the absurd fantasy of so-called scientists who professing themselves wise are fools (pslm.I4.l, Rom. 1. 19,20).

At the base of each feather are nerve sensors, enabling the bird to exercise perfect control of every feather ,through the operation of up to 12,000 tiny muscles. The birds semicircular canals in its inner ear record the bird’s flight position and detect any change in conditions; this is communicated to the birds brain or cerebellum, very highly developed with an extraordinary number of sensory fibres (neurones), receiving a multitude of messages from transmissions of muscle tensions, and instantaneously reverse transmit, giving the bird split second co-ordination.

Four modes of flight are recognised power flying, gliding, soaring, and specialised flight. An Albatross, which has a 12 ft wing span, can glide round the Southern Ocean for literally thousands of miles above the surface of the sea without once flapping its wings. This is phenomenal. A guillemot dives into the ocean to catch a fish, travelling at 60 miles per hour when it enters the water! A Manx Shearwater traverses thousands of miles of (Atlantic) ocean extracting energy from the waves, which it skims! Hawks and eagles use thermal up-currents to soar in great circles, ascending and ascending into the heavens.

Blue jay flight

Blue jay flight (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Solomon noted the marvellous flight of the eagle “The way of an eagle in the air, it is too wonderful for me.” (Pv, 30.19). David notes the extraordinary power of a dove’s flight “Oh that I had wings like a dove.” (Pslm. 55.6). The owl has perfectly silent, noiseless flight (stealth technology), as a result of an extraordinary array of soft downy flight feathers. Water fowl like ducks, oil their feathers making them waterproof, another miracle of design. For a feather to function, all its parts must be integrated together as a design to work.

It is impossible for a supposed long series of chance mutations over millions of years since it is an irreducible mechanism. Requiring, as in any complex advanced engineering project precision planning. A feather is a system of advanced biotechnology, a miracle.

By brother Richard Lister –
from The Apocalyptic Messenger, May 2003

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Seeds to be planted soon

Last month was perhaps cold for many, but when we look at the calendar to plant things we can see that it is a great time to start planning what vegetable varieties will be grown in the garden. Having the flue now I am remembered of those who should have planted them end of January. Loving lots of green and colours in the garden I also know that now is a great time to get your spring flowers germinating and ready for spring! There are many different varieties of annuals and perennials with different grow times, which need your attention to grow times so that your flowers are ready to be planted after last frost. Below are some good varieties to start in January for a last frost in March and April!

For those who want to plant vegetables February is the month, though the cold does not seem to invite us to come outdoors.

Beans at the CIAT gene bank in Colombia, which...

Beans at the CIAT gene bank in Colombia, which has just sent its latest consignments of seeds for conservation at the Global Seed Vault in Svalbard, Norway. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

When we choose our seeds or plants it is important that we look at them not being ‘festered’ with. Man has come to love to play for god and to create all new sorts of plants. Genetically manipulated plants are something we should avoid at all cost.

When people muddle with the plants we can see the disastrous consequences.  Last Summer the harvest did show her grim face in Dunklin County where conveyor belts teem with peaches inside the packing facility at Bader Farms, where fruit is prepared for shipment from its Bootheel source to stores across a nearly 500-mile radius were seriously worried.

Of the 900 acres of peach trees that fill Bill Bader his orchards, some have limbs that are almost entirely defoliated, while countless others have tufts of leaves that are crinkled and yellow, or remain green but are full of holes.

“That’s why you come out here and look at them early in the morning, ’cause you don’t wanna think about them at night,”

Bader said, surveying a field of peach trees.

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Preceding

Seeds of promise

A bird’s eye and reflecting from within

Commemorating the escape from slavery

You’re Lighter Than Air~

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Additional reading

  1. World Agenda for Sustainability
  2. Forbidden Fruit in the Midst of the Garden 4
  3. Necessity of a revelation of creation 5 Getting understanding by Word of God 3
  4. Engaging the culture without losing the gospel
  5. Picking Stones
  6. Testify of the things heard
  7. Chemical warsite and Pushing king of the South

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Further reading

  1. Missouri Peach Farmers Threatened by Pesticide Drift
  2. Dicamba may threaten Missouri peach farm
  3. When to Start Your Seeds
  4. Seed calendar – What to plant now
  5. Seeds… how do they grow?
  6. Vegetable Gardening Know-How : Germination Temperatures & Times
  7. How to grow heirloom tomatoes from seed
  8. The Secret of germination That No One is Talking
  9. AboutGermination shelf
  10. Germination table coming together
  11. Inventory of WIP seeds
  12. Efficient planting, or notEffects of plant growth regulators and NaCl on early developmental stages of Striga hermonthica -IJAAR
    Don’t bother washing the hatPerfect Partners: Oaks & SquirrelsTime to Bloom!
  13. Beautiful yellow daffodils
  14. Hoping against hope
  15. Lightness of being
  16. The perfect soil!
  17. Good Soil (by Gail Ramesh)
  18. Good Soil (by Table Field Farm)
  19. Good soil (by Tokyo Purple girl)
  20. Good Ground, Bad Ground
  21. The Forty-Second Letter: The Basil Metaphor
  22. Success
  23. The Little Things
  24. sometimes the seed falls into good soil…
  25. Ungrateful Me
  26. Organic Fruit: Sermon for June 26, 2016
  27. Produce a Huge Harvest
  28. Sowed on Good Soil—Parable of the Sower
  29. Thorny ground
  30. Die to sin and grow: Analogy between you and a seed
  31. Longing to Stay Thirsty
  32. Women are important to Jesus

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Filed under Ecological affairs, Headlines - News, Health affairs, Nature, Religious affairs

Seeds of promise

I work as a professional gardener and I am surrounded by seeds! They come in the amazing shapes and sizes and perform little miracles on the way. If it were not for seeds our world would not function we would not be able to survive!

I often wonder where the first seeds were and what they were. The only way I can consider it is that in Genesis we are told

       ‘And the earth brought forth grass, the herb that yields seed according to its kind, and the tree that yields fruit, whose seed is in itself according to its kind.’

So the seed was already in the plant. Well, that makes sense; they were there to start with packed with the individual DNA required to produce the plant and fruit.

Every year I go online or wander around garden centres to look and plan different seeds to order so I can grow for the gardens I look after. There is a fantastic variety out there, too many to comprehend. For me it is like being a child in a toy shop!

When they arrive I look at the instructions to see what the requirements of the seeds are. Some will germinate quite easily in a tray of compost at the right time of year. Others need ‘stratifying’ by placing in a refrigerator or freezer to convince the seed it has been through a winter period. Some actually need to be passed through the insides of a certain rare animal before the seed will germinate and then the plant has to be pollinated by an illusive moth to produce flowers and, in turn, seeds! I don’t order those! Check out the Brazil nut story.

The Judean Date Palm at Kibbutz Ketura, nicknamed Methuselah.

Some of the seeds I order are not successful and I abandon them only to find sometime later they germinate after being thrown on the compost heap. Some seeds are very old and then germinate given the right conditions. The oldest mature seed that has grown into a viable plant was a Judean date palm seed about 2,000 years old, recovered from excavations at Herod the Great‘s palace on Masada in Israel. It is amazing that a seed can lay dormant for so long.

Impatiens scapiflora.jpg

Impatiens scapiflora at Silent Valley National Park, South India

File:Cardamine impatiens-75371ep.jpg

An exploding pod of Cardamine impatiens, a common weed in Europe and America. This manner of dissemination is called auto-dissemination or autochory.

Seeds are also fun and exciting when they use different methods to spread their seed. Many years ago when my children were young we walked through a park and in the flower beds were some Impatiens flowers, ripe with seed pods on them. I showed the boys how if you brushed your finger along them they would do a remarkable thing.
They would fire a spring loaded mechanism and with a pop fire the seeds into the air. Each pod has a segment that weakens as it ripens ready for the time of explosion. I can remember the children having fun watching this happen.

impatiens-seeds

Pop-fired impatiens seeds

Some seeds are really tiny and almost like dust, others huge like coconut pods that float in the sea ready to find land to sprout when washed ashore.

Of course seeds don’t often have much success just being on their own. They need other elements to succeed such as animals brushing against them when they will attach themselves sometimes with hooks such as the burr. There is an interesting story behind the burr:

The hook and loop system Velcro, a portmanteau of the French words velours (“velvet”), and crochet (“hook”), the invention for which de Mestral is famous

The inventor of Velcro, more generically known as a “hook and loop fastener” or “touch fastener” (as “Velcro” is technically just a brand of that product), was Swiss engineer, Georges de Mestral.  After going out on a hunting trip with his dog in the Swiss Alps, his trouser legs and his dog’s hair were covered in burrs from the burdock plant.  As an engineer, he naturally began to wonder how exactly the seeds stuck so effectively. He examined the burrs under a microscope and discovered that they had very tiny hooks which allowed the seeds to catch on to things like fabrics, which have tiny loops.

Wow, it made him a wealthy man and produced a very useful product.

Also of course many seeds become plants with flowers which are pollinated by insects (another fascinating story) ready for them to become seeds again.

Without seeds plants and flowers and insects such as bees our whole existence would be in jeopardy. Our food supply depends on the whole cycle of life. There are in existence seed banks to enable us to retain heritage seeds to plant in the future should problems arise with extinction.

A Lite-Trac four-wheeled self-propelled crop sprayer spraying pesticide on a field

God has promised us that “seed time and harvest will never fail” and when you look at seeds and how they reproduce it is highly unlikely but as a human race we may worry about the consequences of using too much pesticides and chemicals on plants. Each year I collect seeds and dry them off ready to store in envelopes with the name clearly written on the outside. They appear to be dead and lifeless but they are waiting for the time to explode into life again on the passing of winter into spring again.

Dandelion seeds (achenes) can be carried long ...

Dandelion seeds (achenes) can be carried long distances by the wind. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

C. Peel

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Reflections on Existence and Teaching

Maria Gianna Iannucci at her blog Reflections on Existence as an educator at Mercy High School in Middletown, CT.  has written courses in Astronomy and Cosmology, Neuroscience, and Medical Botany for the High School level, wonders why she came to teach.

Betonwerksteinskulptur "Lehrer-Student&qu...

Betonwerksteinskulptur “Lehrer-Student” von Reinhard Schmidt in Rostock (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Lots of educators do feel they have a calling. You might even call it a drive which brings them to put themselves at the site at the service for others. Many may have different reasons why they choose to become a teacher. But for sure one can not be a good teacher when one does not love the matter or subject one chooses to bring over to others. In a certain way the one who wants to teach properly must be

in love with God’s new creation. {Why I Teach…}

Every year again the teacher gets to see youngsters which have many questions and lots of aspirations, but also many who do not see the reasons of existence any more and do not know where to go to. It is up to the teacher then to show them some light and many reasons to go forward.

With each generation that moves forward on the earth, hope is born.

when one teaches in class or comes to write a blog, sometimes an other way of teaching and preaching,

It takes contemplation, inspiration, creativity, consistency, and commitment…all those things add up to one thing…love. {A Note To All My Followers}

Without commitment and love for the other one can not bring such life in teaching that can inspire others to continue to do further research and to grow in the knowledge of science, arts, and so on. Without the commitment to the good of others, wanting to give oneself to the other  and to give as much usable information as possible. This free giving, with the knowledge that one can not know everything, that each of us is limited, but by sharing information we all can grow.

As teachers we do also have a mission which should make us to do our utmost best to fulfil the mandate given to us. Our direction should inspire those in front of us and should make us to want to go further than our generation.

Sometimes at the expense of your own wishes. I am committed to holding space for peace and real love in a world that often does not understand what that means. Our behest should also be to bring knowledge and peace, living for the moments “when our students wake up and look at us with new eyes”

as the universe expands beyond their capacity to comprehend. {Why I Teach…}

Maria Gianna Iannucci stands with the young at the threshold of possibilities, when they begin to realize their true purpose.

They catch a brief glimpse of a Love so expansive it leaves them breathless and in awe. I teach for the moments when they see in each other a reflection of the cosmos and the Love that animates it. {Why I Teach…}

I teach to awaken those who slumber, to comfort the grieving, to rejoice with those who dance, to bring hope to those who believe they live in a meaningless world. {Why I Teach…}

for many it may seem a meaningless world, and today with not many prospects. But by opening their eyes to the past and showing them it is a continuous act of reflecting back to mankind and to each of us, individually and in group, that we may come to see much more clear and see that there can be a line of continued hope.

English: A special education teacher assists o...

A special education teacher assists one of her students. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The female writer might, like I have done throughout the years I was teaching them, trying to show her pupils the beauty of our world, always referring back to the master Hand behind it,

so that they see with clarity, the beauty of the gifts they were given by the Eternal One. {Why I Teach…}

I can only hope students remember something from what their wanted to teach them plus from what he or she wanted to show them how we as human beings had to move on in this world. I sincerely hope that

Maybe my students will remember the unconditional love and respect, the feeling of being safe and cared for, being known and cherished for who they really are …and carry that out into the world. {Why I Teach…}

Whatever our purpose here on earth, we having been placed here, have to be fostered, guided by others, who want to guide us thorough our growing up process. even when many do not want to know that

We are brought into existence together for the purpose of growing into the very Love that created our hearts and the stars {Why I Teach…}

each educator has to show that way, with lots of patience and hope for the future.

Maria Gianna Iannucci one of her aims of her classes is to show young people the value of the plants for food and medicine to help keep these spaces free. When we look how far people have grown away from nature this is essential. We should have more teachers showing kids how man should be united with nature.

It is sad that nature is not appreciated in its own right, that we have to extract something from it.

Educators should continue with their unending efforts of trying to bring the parts of the chain of knowledge to youngsters and showing them the tools to handle everything what comes in front of them.

I always hoped that by personal endurance or forbearance I could bring some sparkle to lighten the brains of those in front of me and to get them too look for new ways of building up their own life and a new future. Sometimes our way of looking at things, or way of speaking, perfidies that we are a teacher.  (Even on holiday so many asked me if I was a teacher.)

“Once a teacher, always a teacher”

is how Steve Schwartzman see and I it.

The blogster ends her article

To teachers past and present who have dedicated their lives to the restoration of earth and the cultivation of the human. Why I Teach…

with a quote from the French philosopher and paleontologist known for his theory that man is evolving, mentally and socially, toward a final spiritual unity, Pierre Teilhard de Chardin

“As soon as humans have woken to explicit consciousness of the evolution that carries them along, and begin as one to fix their eyes on the same thing ahead of them, are they not, by that very fact, beginning to love one another?”

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Additional reading

  1. The first question: Why do we live
  2. Welfare state and Poverty in Flanders #7 Education
  3. Too many pupils for not enough teachers
  4. Passion and burn out of a teacher
  5. A learning process for each of us
  6. For those who make other choices
  7. Fools despise wisdom and instruction

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Further reading

  1. Live List of Education Books
  2. The Simplest Question Needs the Simplest Answer
  3. Science: A Great Source of Metaphor…
  4. Teaching ruminations
  5. What My Student Teacher Taught Me
  6. Oh, The Power You Have…And Yet May Not Even Use.
  7. Banning teachers from work
  8. 5 Educational Concepts We Need To Eliminate In 2017
  9. In memoriam George Aditjondro
  10. Thoughts About How I’ve Just Finished School Forever
  11. Reflects the core values of Career Toppers
  12. An Open Letter to My Firsts
  13. What Is a Traditional Teacher?
  14. Critiques of Groupwork in ESL Classrooms
  15. Native Speaker Privilege and Unprofessionalism within the ESL Industry by Kevin Hodgson 
  16. Conversation with my favorite teacher 
  17. Worried
  18. There is Only One First
  19. Shakespeare and High School English Teachers
  20. Tempest-uous Spring Planning
  21. The Girl on the Piccadilly Line
  22. Dear Students
  23. About Me (miss Natalia)
  24. About Me (miss Lindsey)
  25. Teaching the Pre-Modern Post-Election
  26. Organisational Challenges are Usually Technology Related
  27. From business administration to midwifery education: Sara’s midwifery journey
  28. The little school in Huilongguan
  29. Feedback – perfect this and everything else falls into place!
  30. grading
  31. Internet Roundup: Education Part 7
  32. Teacher “number 4”
  33. Shock! My blog has been neglected again.
  34. Clashes with Colleagues.
  35. I have applied for a new job.
  36. Let’s Sum Up – My First Term.
  37. First Semester Down #madeit
  38. Maybe Sunday School Would Be Better If It Were Actually School
  39. Grateful the Time is Near
  40. I’m sure what you meant to say in that email critiquing my repertoire choices was thank you…
  41. New Day, New Start, TEFL wobbles stabilised
  42. Why are languages being taught like math?
  43. First Semester Review
  44. Time to recharge
  45. A Tale of Two Educators
  46. Teaching Others about Jesus

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Filed under Activism and Peace Work, Cultural affairs, Educational affairs, Nature

Wings

Adding some photographers on the list to look out for is Rich Proctor who not only knows how to capture some elements of nature but also know how to bring our minds to other worlds by his words. The main purpose of his blog is to document his journey out of a dissatisfying existence of under-achievement and unused potential, into an extra-ordinary life of remarkable achievement and fulfilment. This way he hopes to  inspire a few people along the way.

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Preceding article:

A 2016 suggestion for some interesting photographic sites

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Further looks

  1. Bald Eagle #23
  2. Bald Eagle #44
  3. The Eagle
  4. Eagle Rescued From Storm Drain Has Died
  5. This Way and That
  6. A Southern Bald Eagle
  7. Day 455: Mongolian Eagle Hunter
  8. Limb with a View
  9. Pure Magnificence
  10. Minnesota DNR eagle cam up and running for the new season!
  11. Difference between Bald Eagle and Golden Eagle
  12. Second egg arrives at the AEF Northeast Florida eaglecam nest!
  13. New Nest, New Camera and New Name for the Alcoa Davenport Eaglecam

Rich Proctor Photography

wings

Wings to soar
Wings to fly
Wings on which I rise
Over earth, into the eternal sky

Wings of force
Wings of skill
Wings on which I glide
Over earth, until I make the kill.

Wings so wide
Wings so strong
Wings on which I reign
Over earth, my entire life-long.
~ Rich ~

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A 2016 suggestion for some interesting photographic sites

In 2016 Wildlife Photographer of the Year and Looking at Flowers through a Macro Lens we spoke about great photographers of the wild, people should come to know, like Leanne Cole, Dan Frugalberg, Pete Hillman, Gideon Knight, Cindy KnokeTim Laman, Rabirius,  and Purple Rays (Jonathan Udo Ndah). They all bring a different touch on the way we can look at nature. Rabirius even dares to bring his own graphic mastering to change the real view, giving it an other dimension.

dsc04221-1

Nature’s souls go to wild spaces – Cindy Noke

Those photographers show how while other’s thrive in the social whirl, a nature’s soul will find depth of meaning {Nature’s Soul~} or may explore the relationship between nature and civilisation (like for example A Book Of Animals by Rabirius).

Even when we do have to find a small window of existence, those people have the magic touch on their fingers to show us the beauty of god’s universe. In such beautiful area the Divine Creator has given to mankind, in Bragg Creek, Alberta near both the prairies and the mountains lives also a photographer we would like to introduce to you.
Christopher Martin has an artistic background, having grown up painting and sketching.  Following university, he studied Chinese painting in Taiwan. His interested in the photographic medium came around 2000 and that has been his primary artistic direction for the past 10+ years which is not bad for us who can enjoy his third eye with which he allows himself to play with reality, to share it as he sees it or to create a version of it through long exposure, wide angles or motion blurs.  The freedom he has to photograph in so many different ways feeds his creativity and helps to drive his enthusiasm to create art.

His photography has been recognized in contests run by National Geographic, Urban Photographer of the Year, Photo District News, Photolife Magazine, Travel Photographer of the Year, World Photography Organization, Photofocus, Photography Masters Cup and others.  If you are interested in seeing a summary of some of these awards, please visit this page.

It is the city man, Arte Wolfe who inspires him. That son of commercial artists who graduated from the University of Washington with Bachelor’s degrees in fine arts and art education in 1975, has made in the short time of his photography career a remarkable testament to the durability and demand for his images, his expertise, and his passionate advocacy for the environment and indigenous culture, working on every continent, in hundreds of locations, and on a dazzling array of projects, making it possible for us to travel with him in our dreams. No wonder some of the world’s top magazines such as National Geographic, Smithsonian, Audubon, GEO, and Terre Sauvage wanted to offer their readers the magical view of this artist.

Enter Gallery

Pine Peak Toned Gelatin-Silver Print, 14×11″ Image, 20×16″ Mat – Don Hong-Oai

An other source of inspiration for christopher Martin came from the Vietnam University College of Art and studied with Long Chin-San in Taiwan before he fled by boat and came as a refugee to the United States where he resides completely within a Chinese community. Mr. Don Hong-Oai Bio got recognised at the Ansel Adams Gallery, Yosemite National Park, California in 1994 and got awards from the International Federation of Photographic Art, Switzerland and from the Chinatown Photographic Society.

Paul Nicklen, a globally acclaimed, Canadian-born photographer and marine biologist,and also a  ildlife Photographer of the Year Competition winner, was the other influencer for Martin. That Canadian photographer has been documenting both the beauty and the plight of our planet’s polar regions and our world’s oceans for over twenty years. In Europe his work is known by us mostly from the National Geographic Magazine. But he is also the is the recipient of more than thirty international awards, including the Natural Resources Defense Council’s BioGems Visionary Award for his material of several years showing the world how we need to be careful about the use of fossils, not to destroy the arctic. Born and raised on Baffin Island, Nunavut, grown up in one of the only non-Inuit families in a tiny native settlement amid the ice fields of Northern Canada, he is the right man to show how not only the Inuit are endangered but an entire animal-world. for us clearly also a photographer to follow and to see how he as  a founder and contributing photographer to SeaLegacy, can work out his plans on dedicating his efforts to shining a light into the issues, species, and ecosystems he so deeply cares about.
His photography book Polar Obsession captures up-close documentation of the lives of leopard seals, whales, walruses, polar bears, bearded seals, and narwhals, and gives a vivid portrait of two extraordinary, endangered ecosystems.

Llyn Ogwen

Transmogrify–Is That A Word? / Talacre Beach – Llyn Ogwen by Mike Hardisty

Based in the beautiful countryside of North Wales Mike Hardisty is an other artist who catches our eye in 2016, the year he has been trialling some new photography software ACDSee Ultimate and PhotoMatix {Llangelynin–A Very Small Church}. For him landscape photography forms a very important part of my life and capturing the ever changing scenery gives me a sense of discovery. For him, photography in the mountains or on the coast, experiencing changing light and weather conditions, is a continuous learning process and gives him the freedom to think and live.

For those who are stuck in a city and think there can not be a place for some green and colours they also should hear Chicago’s motto which is

Urbs Horto, or City in a Garden.

Given the amount of sprawl and environmental damage that’s occurred since its founding, the blog we like to introduce would find it hard to argue that Chicago is still a city in a garden. However, they can still have a garden in the city.

Jason gardens in Evanston, Illinois (zone 5), about one mile from the border with Chicago.

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A view of the Blue Ridge Mountains

Jason Bertkay lives with his spouse, Judy, and has two grown sons. Judy, is in charge of photographs, while Jason is in charge of plants. They also motor down the Skyline Drive in Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains,a.o..

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The Texan Crescentspot photo by “bybio” the Back yard biology

We also can find a team of a mother, retired biology professor – former biology major, nurse daughter and blogger who can offer us some nice pictures. Even though the landscape looks (and feels) arid, southern Arizona seems to be a mecca for butterflies, perhaps because of the diversity of vegetation and flowers there, and they are able to have us enjoy those and many other animals and flowers in their region.

Chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs)

An Old Friend Returns – male Chaffinch – Pete Hillman

An other photographer who let us look often at his front and rear gardens is Pete Hillman, whom we mentioned already in earlier posts. Photography is his main hobby, but he does know to use a good eye and can give us close-ups of things most people even do not notice when walking around.  He knows the way of recording the beauty and wonders he discovers within nature. Most of the species found on his site were observed in the county of Staffordshire, England, where he lives, whilst others are from around various locations in the UK.

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Foggy Autumn Road by Rebecca Gillum whose gypsy soul keeps her searching

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Winter comes early to the mountains. Rime ice covered trees in Smoky Mountain National Park. – Rebecca Gillum

From the road we also get lovely pictures from Rebecca Gillum. She knows the limitations of life and is content but is able to catch that moment in time and to present it for eternity. {So I Like Best of All Autumn} In her life she want to be willing
to be dazzled — to cast aside the weight of facts, and like Mary Oliver maybe even
to float a little above this difficult world. {To Be Dazzled}

We hope you too may be dazzled finding such nice photographs. Whilst the animals may have a well-defined hunting ground that the photographers are familiar with, they shall need patience to catch it, enabling to place that magic they saw in a moment for us to discover on a two dimensional plate.

A marmot seen on top of Mount Dana, Yosemite, ...

A marmot seen on top of Mount Dana, Yosemite, CA, USA. The road in the background is Tioga Pass Road. (Edited version of original: sharpened and curve adjustment by jjron). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Please do find to read

Get the lenses out to getting closer again

Looking at Flowers through a Macro Lens

Birds, Birds Everywhere

2016 Wildlife Photographer of the Year

8 Reasons We’re Looking Forward to Springtime Photography

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Find the interesting sites

  1. Cindy Knoke + on Pinterest
  2. Rabirius whom you also can follow on Pinterest
  3. Don Hong-Oai Bio
  4. Christopher Martin
  5. Art Wolfe
  6. Paul Nicklen
  7. Say It With A Camera – Mike Hardisty
  8. Garden in a city
  9. Rebecca Gillum
  10. Back yard biology

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Further reading

  1. In My Own Words Weekly Photo Challenge- Tiny
  2. Photography Journal Blog Weekly Photo Challenge- Tiny
  3. Weekly Photo Challenge – Small on Tiny – Celina2609’s Blog
  4. Our Own Little Walk of Fame – Aggie’s Amygdala
  5. Say Tiny! – Blog of Hammad Rais
  6. thephotoseye Tiny Thrills
  7. Another Tiny View – Rebecca Wiseman Portfolio
  8. Miss Jerz-tucky Weekly Photo Challenge- Tiny
  9. Words Like Honey Weekly Photo Challenge- Tiny
  10. deetravelssite.wordpress.com Tiny
  11. This is Another Story Color Transformation
  12. From Egg to Sheer Beauty – Micks Blog
  13. Doug Couvillion’s Photo Blog Weekly Photo Challenge- Transmogrify
  14. Sea Play Photography Weekly Challenge- Transmogrify
  15. XingfuMama My little pumpkins don’t do scary
  16. Crafting Photolog Weekly Photo Challenge- Transmogrify
  17. Mataro Photographs Halloween Transmogrification
  18. Nature & Travel Photos WPC – Transmogrify
  19. Let the Images Speak Transmogrify
  20. The Land Slide Photography Time
  21. Mr. Finch
  22. Photographs from the Edge- Review
  23. On the Hunt
  24. Take Away
  25. A Twist of Moss
  26. DX vs. FX cameras for wildlife photography
  27. Breaking It Down
  28. Of Fairytales
  29. butterflies in the desert?
  30. An Alien World #2
  31. Land of Lilliput
  32. Common Greenshield Lichen
  33. Pawpaw Sphinx
  34. This Way and That
  35. Charming smile
  36. Birds of the Texas Gulf Coast – Common Nighthawk
  37. Great Horned Owl
  38. Friday’s Frenzied Flights
  39. “I’ve Got To Tell Everybody About This!”
  40. Limb with a View
  41. Caribou in Newfoundland
  42. Even More Jelly ear
  43. Golden Tanager (Tangara arthus)
  44. A photographer’s eagle eye
  45. Into the Sunset
  46. A Dazzle of Zebra, a Journey of Giraffe and a Crash of Rhino
  47. Best Camera Trap Captures – October 2016
  48. Camdeboo – The Green Valley In The Great Thirstland
  49. Up Close!
  50. Pure Magnificence
  51. Octoberfest 2016
  52. Wild November Sky
  53. Along the Rio Grande
  54. Fotografare animali selvatici con TriggerSmart
  55. One Left For The squirrels
  56. A Highland Cow
  57. Wings
  58. Beautiful Bracken
  59. Birds at the British Wildlife Centre
  60. Supermoon
  61. Supermoon #2
  62. Drones and Machine Learning Combine to identify, protect endangered sea cows
  63. Male Kestrel
  64. Riverside
  65. First Snow of the Season
  66. Muddy Ibis
  67. Hiding Place
  68. Tiny
  69. Crazy Legs
  70. Weekly Photo Challenge: Tiny
  71. Photographer Tim Plowden gets up close and personal with forest creatures
  72. In the presence of greatness
  73. Magpie
  74. About Mites And Ticks
  75. About Grasses, Sedges And Rushes
  76. Swallow
  77. Tiny friends
  78. Junco Junkie
  79. Dark Eye with a Catchlight
  80. This Beautiful Bird
  81. Bulrush

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