Category Archives: Nature

Intelligent design Not chance > Flight of birds – Feathers

Wing feathers and bones

Wing feathers and bones (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

-Feathers: As well as the general streamlining and aerodynamic qualities of birds and aerofoil wing design, the feathers of birds are all important for effi­ciency in flight and accuracy of navigational movement through the air. Every movement of a feather when a bird is in flight is designed to extract energy from the air and utilise it effectively for control of the aerial medium through which it passes, as well as providing insulation, acting as fans, and contributing to the aerodynamic streamlining of the wonderful creature.

For their weight feathers are stronger than any man made substitute. A bird individually has literally thousands of feathers of different types, generally fluffy underneath (for warmth) and more sail-like above. For example a hen may have more than 8,300, a swan over 25,000 feathers! Eider ducks produce thousands of feathers, which are so soft and fluffy that they are used for eider downs and stuffing pillars.

The construction of feathers is a marvel of design. A single wing feather of a pigeon has more than a million individual parts, which testifies to its phenomenal micro engineering design. There is a central rachis or hollow, foam filled, spine or quill, from which arise barbs and from these barbules which zip together with minute hooks (hamuli). These feathers are kept in perfect order by the bird constantly preening its feathers. The feathers respond to air pressure and change shape constantly in relation to the changing pressure and air flow.

Flight feathers at the wing tip are flexible and mobile like a propellor and respond to flight patterns in movements, speed, landing and braking speed, gliding (called slotting). Other feathers function like like ailerons and flaps in an aircraft.

How could all this marvellous engineering design happen by chance? This is the absurd fantasy of so-called scientists who professing themselves wise are fools (pslm.I4.l, Rom. 1. 19,20).

At the base of each feather are nerve sensors, enabling the bird to exercise perfect control of every feather ,through the operation of up to 12,000 tiny muscles. The birds semicircular canals in its inner ear record the bird’s flight position and detect any change in conditions; this is communicated to the birds brain or cerebellum, very highly developed with an extraordinary number of sensory fibres (neurones), receiving a multitude of messages from transmissions of muscle tensions, and instantaneously reverse transmit, giving the bird split second co-ordination.

Four modes of flight are recognised power flying, gliding, soaring, and specialised flight. An Albatross, which has a 12 ft wing span, can glide round the Southern Ocean for literally thousands of miles above the surface of the sea without once flapping its wings. This is phenomenal. A guillemot dives into the ocean to catch a fish, travelling at 60 miles per hour when it enters the water! A Manx Shearwater traverses thousands of miles of (Atlantic) ocean extracting energy from the waves, which it skims! Hawks and eagles use thermal up-currents to soar in great circles, ascending and ascending into the heavens.

Blue jay flight

Blue jay flight (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Solomon noted the marvellous flight of the eagle “The way of an eagle in the air, it is too wonderful for me.” (Pv, 30.19). David notes the extraordinary power of a dove’s flight “Oh that I had wings like a dove.” (Pslm. 55.6). The owl has perfectly silent, noiseless flight (stealth technology), as a result of an extraordinary array of soft downy flight feathers. Water fowl like ducks, oil their feathers making them waterproof, another miracle of design. For a feather to function, all its parts must be integrated together as a design to work.

It is impossible for a supposed long series of chance mutations over millions of years since it is an irreducible mechanism. Requiring, as in any complex advanced engineering project precision planning. A feather is a system of advanced biotechnology, a miracle.

By brother Richard Lister –
from The Apocalyptic Messenger, May 2003

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Seeds to be planted soon

Last month was perhaps cold for many, but when we look at the calendar to plant things we can see that it is a great time to start planning what vegetable varieties will be grown in the garden. Having the flue now I am remembered of those who should have planted them end of January. Loving lots of green and colours in the garden I also know that now is a great time to get your spring flowers germinating and ready for spring! There are many different varieties of annuals and perennials with different grow times, which need your attention to grow times so that your flowers are ready to be planted after last frost. Below are some good varieties to start in January for a last frost in March and April!

For those who want to plant vegetables February is the month, though the cold does not seem to invite us to come outdoors.

Beans at the CIAT gene bank in Colombia, which...

Beans at the CIAT gene bank in Colombia, which has just sent its latest consignments of seeds for conservation at the Global Seed Vault in Svalbard, Norway. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

When we choose our seeds or plants it is important that we look at them not being ‘festered’ with. Man has come to love to play for god and to create all new sorts of plants. Genetically manipulated plants are something we should avoid at all cost.

When people muddle with the plants we can see the disastrous consequences.  Last Summer the harvest did show her grim face in Dunklin County where conveyor belts teem with peaches inside the packing facility at Bader Farms, where fruit is prepared for shipment from its Bootheel source to stores across a nearly 500-mile radius were seriously worried.

Of the 900 acres of peach trees that fill Bill Bader his orchards, some have limbs that are almost entirely defoliated, while countless others have tufts of leaves that are crinkled and yellow, or remain green but are full of holes.

“That’s why you come out here and look at them early in the morning, ’cause you don’t wanna think about them at night,”

Bader said, surveying a field of peach trees.

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Preceding

Seeds of promise

A bird’s eye and reflecting from within

Commemorating the escape from slavery

You’re Lighter Than Air~

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Additional reading

  1. World Agenda for Sustainability
  2. Forbidden Fruit in the Midst of the Garden 4
  3. Necessity of a revelation of creation 5 Getting understanding by Word of God 3
  4. Engaging the culture without losing the gospel
  5. Picking Stones
  6. Testify of the things heard
  7. Chemical warsite and Pushing king of the South

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Further reading

  1. Missouri Peach Farmers Threatened by Pesticide Drift
  2. Dicamba may threaten Missouri peach farm
  3. When to Start Your Seeds
  4. Seed calendar – What to plant now
  5. Seeds… how do they grow?
  6. Vegetable Gardening Know-How : Germination Temperatures & Times
  7. How to grow heirloom tomatoes from seed
  8. The Secret of germination That No One is Talking
  9. AboutGermination shelf
  10. Germination table coming together
  11. Inventory of WIP seeds
  12. Efficient planting, or notEffects of plant growth regulators and NaCl on early developmental stages of Striga hermonthica -IJAAR
    Don’t bother washing the hatPerfect Partners: Oaks & SquirrelsTime to Bloom!
  13. Beautiful yellow daffodils
  14. Hoping against hope
  15. Lightness of being
  16. The perfect soil!
  17. Good Soil (by Gail Ramesh)
  18. Good Soil (by Table Field Farm)
  19. Good soil (by Tokyo Purple girl)
  20. Good Ground, Bad Ground
  21. The Forty-Second Letter: The Basil Metaphor
  22. Success
  23. The Little Things
  24. sometimes the seed falls into good soil…
  25. Ungrateful Me
  26. Organic Fruit: Sermon for June 26, 2016
  27. Produce a Huge Harvest
  28. Sowed on Good Soil—Parable of the Sower
  29. Thorny ground
  30. Die to sin and grow: Analogy between you and a seed
  31. Longing to Stay Thirsty
  32. Women are important to Jesus

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Filed under Ecological affairs, Headlines - News, Health affairs, Nature, Religious affairs

Seeds of promise

I work as a professional gardener and I am surrounded by seeds! They come in the amazing shapes and sizes and perform little miracles on the way. If it were not for seeds our world would not function we would not be able to survive!

I often wonder where the first seeds were and what they were. The only way I can consider it is that in Genesis we are told

       ‘And the earth brought forth grass, the herb that yields seed according to its kind, and the tree that yields fruit, whose seed is in itself according to its kind.’

So the seed was already in the plant. Well, that makes sense; they were there to start with packed with the individual DNA required to produce the plant and fruit.

Every year I go online or wander around garden centres to look and plan different seeds to order so I can grow for the gardens I look after. There is a fantastic variety out there, too many to comprehend. For me it is like being a child in a toy shop!

When they arrive I look at the instructions to see what the requirements of the seeds are. Some will germinate quite easily in a tray of compost at the right time of year. Others need ‘stratifying’ by placing in a refrigerator or freezer to convince the seed it has been through a winter period. Some actually need to be passed through the insides of a certain rare animal before the seed will germinate and then the plant has to be pollinated by an illusive moth to produce flowers and, in turn, seeds! I don’t order those! Check out the Brazil nut story.

The Judean Date Palm at Kibbutz Ketura, nicknamed Methuselah.

Some of the seeds I order are not successful and I abandon them only to find sometime later they germinate after being thrown on the compost heap. Some seeds are very old and then germinate given the right conditions. The oldest mature seed that has grown into a viable plant was a Judean date palm seed about 2,000 years old, recovered from excavations at Herod the Great‘s palace on Masada in Israel. It is amazing that a seed can lay dormant for so long.

Impatiens scapiflora.jpg

Impatiens scapiflora at Silent Valley National Park, South India

File:Cardamine impatiens-75371ep.jpg

An exploding pod of Cardamine impatiens, a common weed in Europe and America. This manner of dissemination is called auto-dissemination or autochory.

Seeds are also fun and exciting when they use different methods to spread their seed. Many years ago when my children were young we walked through a park and in the flower beds were some Impatiens flowers, ripe with seed pods on them. I showed the boys how if you brushed your finger along them they would do a remarkable thing.
They would fire a spring loaded mechanism and with a pop fire the seeds into the air. Each pod has a segment that weakens as it ripens ready for the time of explosion. I can remember the children having fun watching this happen.

impatiens-seeds

Pop-fired impatiens seeds

Some seeds are really tiny and almost like dust, others huge like coconut pods that float in the sea ready to find land to sprout when washed ashore.

Of course seeds don’t often have much success just being on their own. They need other elements to succeed such as animals brushing against them when they will attach themselves sometimes with hooks such as the burr. There is an interesting story behind the burr:

The hook and loop system Velcro, a portmanteau of the French words velours (“velvet”), and crochet (“hook”), the invention for which de Mestral is famous

The inventor of Velcro, more generically known as a “hook and loop fastener” or “touch fastener” (as “Velcro” is technically just a brand of that product), was Swiss engineer, Georges de Mestral.  After going out on a hunting trip with his dog in the Swiss Alps, his trouser legs and his dog’s hair were covered in burrs from the burdock plant.  As an engineer, he naturally began to wonder how exactly the seeds stuck so effectively. He examined the burrs under a microscope and discovered that they had very tiny hooks which allowed the seeds to catch on to things like fabrics, which have tiny loops.

Wow, it made him a wealthy man and produced a very useful product.

Also of course many seeds become plants with flowers which are pollinated by insects (another fascinating story) ready for them to become seeds again.

Without seeds plants and flowers and insects such as bees our whole existence would be in jeopardy. Our food supply depends on the whole cycle of life. There are in existence seed banks to enable us to retain heritage seeds to plant in the future should problems arise with extinction.

A Lite-Trac four-wheeled self-propelled crop sprayer spraying pesticide on a field

God has promised us that “seed time and harvest will never fail” and when you look at seeds and how they reproduce it is highly unlikely but as a human race we may worry about the consequences of using too much pesticides and chemicals on plants. Each year I collect seeds and dry them off ready to store in envelopes with the name clearly written on the outside. They appear to be dead and lifeless but they are waiting for the time to explode into life again on the passing of winter into spring again.

Dandelion seeds (achenes) can be carried long ...

Dandelion seeds (achenes) can be carried long distances by the wind. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

C. Peel

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Reflections on Existence and Teaching

Maria Gianna Iannucci at her blog Reflections on Existence as an educator at Mercy High School in Middletown, CT.  has written courses in Astronomy and Cosmology, Neuroscience, and Medical Botany for the High School level, wonders why she came to teach.

Betonwerksteinskulptur "Lehrer-Student&qu...

Betonwerksteinskulptur “Lehrer-Student” von Reinhard Schmidt in Rostock (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Lots of educators do feel they have a calling. You might even call it a drive which brings them to put themselves at the site at the service for others. Many may have different reasons why they choose to become a teacher. But for sure one can not be a good teacher when one does not love the matter or subject one chooses to bring over to others. In a certain way the one who wants to teach properly must be

in love with God’s new creation. {Why I Teach…}

Every year again the teacher gets to see youngsters which have many questions and lots of aspirations, but also many who do not see the reasons of existence any more and do not know where to go to. It is up to the teacher then to show them some light and many reasons to go forward.

With each generation that moves forward on the earth, hope is born.

when one teaches in class or comes to write a blog, sometimes an other way of teaching and preaching,

It takes contemplation, inspiration, creativity, consistency, and commitment…all those things add up to one thing…love. {A Note To All My Followers}

Without commitment and love for the other one can not bring such life in teaching that can inspire others to continue to do further research and to grow in the knowledge of science, arts, and so on. Without the commitment to the good of others, wanting to give oneself to the other  and to give as much usable information as possible. This free giving, with the knowledge that one can not know everything, that each of us is limited, but by sharing information we all can grow.

As teachers we do also have a mission which should make us to do our utmost best to fulfil the mandate given to us. Our direction should inspire those in front of us and should make us to want to go further than our generation.

Sometimes at the expense of your own wishes. I am committed to holding space for peace and real love in a world that often does not understand what that means. Our behest should also be to bring knowledge and peace, living for the moments “when our students wake up and look at us with new eyes”

as the universe expands beyond their capacity to comprehend. {Why I Teach…}

Maria Gianna Iannucci stands with the young at the threshold of possibilities, when they begin to realize their true purpose.

They catch a brief glimpse of a Love so expansive it leaves them breathless and in awe. I teach for the moments when they see in each other a reflection of the cosmos and the Love that animates it. {Why I Teach…}

I teach to awaken those who slumber, to comfort the grieving, to rejoice with those who dance, to bring hope to those who believe they live in a meaningless world. {Why I Teach…}

for many it may seem a meaningless world, and today with not many prospects. But by opening their eyes to the past and showing them it is a continuous act of reflecting back to mankind and to each of us, individually and in group, that we may come to see much more clear and see that there can be a line of continued hope.

English: A special education teacher assists o...

A special education teacher assists one of her students. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The female writer might, like I have done throughout the years I was teaching them, trying to show her pupils the beauty of our world, always referring back to the master Hand behind it,

so that they see with clarity, the beauty of the gifts they were given by the Eternal One. {Why I Teach…}

I can only hope students remember something from what their wanted to teach them plus from what he or she wanted to show them how we as human beings had to move on in this world. I sincerely hope that

Maybe my students will remember the unconditional love and respect, the feeling of being safe and cared for, being known and cherished for who they really are …and carry that out into the world. {Why I Teach…}

Whatever our purpose here on earth, we having been placed here, have to be fostered, guided by others, who want to guide us thorough our growing up process. even when many do not want to know that

We are brought into existence together for the purpose of growing into the very Love that created our hearts and the stars {Why I Teach…}

each educator has to show that way, with lots of patience and hope for the future.

Maria Gianna Iannucci one of her aims of her classes is to show young people the value of the plants for food and medicine to help keep these spaces free. When we look how far people have grown away from nature this is essential. We should have more teachers showing kids how man should be united with nature.

It is sad that nature is not appreciated in its own right, that we have to extract something from it.

Educators should continue with their unending efforts of trying to bring the parts of the chain of knowledge to youngsters and showing them the tools to handle everything what comes in front of them.

I always hoped that by personal endurance or forbearance I could bring some sparkle to lighten the brains of those in front of me and to get them too look for new ways of building up their own life and a new future. Sometimes our way of looking at things, or way of speaking, perfidies that we are a teacher.  (Even on holiday so many asked me if I was a teacher.)

“Once a teacher, always a teacher”

is how Steve Schwartzman see and I it.

The blogster ends her article

To teachers past and present who have dedicated their lives to the restoration of earth and the cultivation of the human. Why I Teach…

with a quote from the French philosopher and paleontologist known for his theory that man is evolving, mentally and socially, toward a final spiritual unity, Pierre Teilhard de Chardin

“As soon as humans have woken to explicit consciousness of the evolution that carries them along, and begin as one to fix their eyes on the same thing ahead of them, are they not, by that very fact, beginning to love one another?”

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Additional reading

  1. The first question: Why do we live
  2. Welfare state and Poverty in Flanders #7 Education
  3. Too many pupils for not enough teachers
  4. Passion and burn out of a teacher
  5. A learning process for each of us
  6. For those who make other choices
  7. Fools despise wisdom and instruction

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Further reading

  1. Live List of Education Books
  2. The Simplest Question Needs the Simplest Answer
  3. Science: A Great Source of Metaphor…
  4. Teaching ruminations
  5. What My Student Teacher Taught Me
  6. Oh, The Power You Have…And Yet May Not Even Use.
  7. Banning teachers from work
  8. 5 Educational Concepts We Need To Eliminate In 2017
  9. In memoriam George Aditjondro
  10. Thoughts About How I’ve Just Finished School Forever
  11. Reflects the core values of Career Toppers
  12. An Open Letter to My Firsts
  13. What Is a Traditional Teacher?
  14. Critiques of Groupwork in ESL Classrooms
  15. Native Speaker Privilege and Unprofessionalism within the ESL Industry by Kevin Hodgson 
  16. Conversation with my favorite teacher 
  17. Worried
  18. There is Only One First
  19. Shakespeare and High School English Teachers
  20. Tempest-uous Spring Planning
  21. The Girl on the Piccadilly Line
  22. Dear Students
  23. About Me (miss Natalia)
  24. About Me (miss Lindsey)
  25. Teaching the Pre-Modern Post-Election
  26. Organisational Challenges are Usually Technology Related
  27. From business administration to midwifery education: Sara’s midwifery journey
  28. The little school in Huilongguan
  29. Feedback – perfect this and everything else falls into place!
  30. grading
  31. Internet Roundup: Education Part 7
  32. Teacher “number 4”
  33. Shock! My blog has been neglected again.
  34. Clashes with Colleagues.
  35. I have applied for a new job.
  36. Let’s Sum Up – My First Term.
  37. First Semester Down #madeit
  38. Maybe Sunday School Would Be Better If It Were Actually School
  39. Grateful the Time is Near
  40. I’m sure what you meant to say in that email critiquing my repertoire choices was thank you…
  41. New Day, New Start, TEFL wobbles stabilised
  42. Why are languages being taught like math?
  43. First Semester Review
  44. Time to recharge
  45. A Tale of Two Educators
  46. Teaching Others about Jesus

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Filed under Activism and Peace Work, Cultural affairs, Educational affairs, Nature

Wings

Adding some photographers on the list to look out for is Rich Proctor who not only knows how to capture some elements of nature but also know how to bring our minds to other worlds by his words. The main purpose of his blog is to document his journey out of a dissatisfying existence of under-achievement and unused potential, into an extra-ordinary life of remarkable achievement and fulfilment. This way he hopes to  inspire a few people along the way.

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Preceding article:

A 2016 suggestion for some interesting photographic sites

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Further looks

  1. Bald Eagle #23
  2. Bald Eagle #44
  3. The Eagle
  4. Eagle Rescued From Storm Drain Has Died
  5. This Way and That
  6. A Southern Bald Eagle
  7. Day 455: Mongolian Eagle Hunter
  8. Limb with a View
  9. Pure Magnificence
  10. Minnesota DNR eagle cam up and running for the new season!
  11. Difference between Bald Eagle and Golden Eagle
  12. Second egg arrives at the AEF Northeast Florida eaglecam nest!
  13. New Nest, New Camera and New Name for the Alcoa Davenport Eaglecam

Rich Proctor Photography

wings

Wings to soar
Wings to fly
Wings on which I rise
Over earth, into the eternal sky

Wings of force
Wings of skill
Wings on which I glide
Over earth, until I make the kill.

Wings so wide
Wings so strong
Wings on which I reign
Over earth, my entire life-long.
~ Rich ~

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Filed under Nature, Pictures of the World, Re-Blogs and Great Blogs

A 2016 suggestion for some interesting photographic sites

In 2016 Wildlife Photographer of the Year and Looking at Flowers through a Macro Lens we spoke about great photographers of the wild, people should come to know, like Leanne Cole, Dan Frugalberg, Pete Hillman, Gideon Knight, Cindy KnokeTim Laman, Rabirius,  and Purple Rays (Jonathan Udo Ndah). They all bring a different touch on the way we can look at nature. Rabirius even dares to bring his own graphic mastering to change the real view, giving it an other dimension.

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Nature’s souls go to wild spaces – Cindy Noke

Those photographers show how while other’s thrive in the social whirl, a nature’s soul will find depth of meaning {Nature’s Soul~} or may explore the relationship between nature and civilisation (like for example A Book Of Animals by Rabirius).

Even when we do have to find a small window of existence, those people have the magic touch on their fingers to show us the beauty of god’s universe. In such beautiful area the Divine Creator has given to mankind, in Bragg Creek, Alberta near both the prairies and the mountains lives also a photographer we would like to introduce to you.
Christopher Martin has an artistic background, having grown up painting and sketching.  Following university, he studied Chinese painting in Taiwan. His interested in the photographic medium came around 2000 and that has been his primary artistic direction for the past 10+ years which is not bad for us who can enjoy his third eye with which he allows himself to play with reality, to share it as he sees it or to create a version of it through long exposure, wide angles or motion blurs.  The freedom he has to photograph in so many different ways feeds his creativity and helps to drive his enthusiasm to create art.

His photography has been recognized in contests run by National Geographic, Urban Photographer of the Year, Photo District News, Photolife Magazine, Travel Photographer of the Year, World Photography Organization, Photofocus, Photography Masters Cup and others.  If you are interested in seeing a summary of some of these awards, please visit this page.

It is the city man, Arte Wolfe who inspires him. That son of commercial artists who graduated from the University of Washington with Bachelor’s degrees in fine arts and art education in 1975, has made in the short time of his photography career a remarkable testament to the durability and demand for his images, his expertise, and his passionate advocacy for the environment and indigenous culture, working on every continent, in hundreds of locations, and on a dazzling array of projects, making it possible for us to travel with him in our dreams. No wonder some of the world’s top magazines such as National Geographic, Smithsonian, Audubon, GEO, and Terre Sauvage wanted to offer their readers the magical view of this artist.

Enter Gallery

Pine Peak Toned Gelatin-Silver Print, 14×11″ Image, 20×16″ Mat – Don Hong-Oai

An other source of inspiration for christopher Martin came from the Vietnam University College of Art and studied with Long Chin-San in Taiwan before he fled by boat and came as a refugee to the United States where he resides completely within a Chinese community. Mr. Don Hong-Oai Bio got recognised at the Ansel Adams Gallery, Yosemite National Park, California in 1994 and got awards from the International Federation of Photographic Art, Switzerland and from the Chinatown Photographic Society.

Paul Nicklen, a globally acclaimed, Canadian-born photographer and marine biologist,and also a  ildlife Photographer of the Year Competition winner, was the other influencer for Martin. That Canadian photographer has been documenting both the beauty and the plight of our planet’s polar regions and our world’s oceans for over twenty years. In Europe his work is known by us mostly from the National Geographic Magazine. But he is also the is the recipient of more than thirty international awards, including the Natural Resources Defense Council’s BioGems Visionary Award for his material of several years showing the world how we need to be careful about the use of fossils, not to destroy the arctic. Born and raised on Baffin Island, Nunavut, grown up in one of the only non-Inuit families in a tiny native settlement amid the ice fields of Northern Canada, he is the right man to show how not only the Inuit are endangered but an entire animal-world. for us clearly also a photographer to follow and to see how he as  a founder and contributing photographer to SeaLegacy, can work out his plans on dedicating his efforts to shining a light into the issues, species, and ecosystems he so deeply cares about.
His photography book Polar Obsession captures up-close documentation of the lives of leopard seals, whales, walruses, polar bears, bearded seals, and narwhals, and gives a vivid portrait of two extraordinary, endangered ecosystems.

Llyn Ogwen

Transmogrify–Is That A Word? / Talacre Beach – Llyn Ogwen by Mike Hardisty

Based in the beautiful countryside of North Wales Mike Hardisty is an other artist who catches our eye in 2016, the year he has been trialling some new photography software ACDSee Ultimate and PhotoMatix {Llangelynin–A Very Small Church}. For him landscape photography forms a very important part of my life and capturing the ever changing scenery gives me a sense of discovery. For him, photography in the mountains or on the coast, experiencing changing light and weather conditions, is a continuous learning process and gives him the freedom to think and live.

For those who are stuck in a city and think there can not be a place for some green and colours they also should hear Chicago’s motto which is

Urbs Horto, or City in a Garden.

Given the amount of sprawl and environmental damage that’s occurred since its founding, the blog we like to introduce would find it hard to argue that Chicago is still a city in a garden. However, they can still have a garden in the city.

Jason gardens in Evanston, Illinois (zone 5), about one mile from the border with Chicago.

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A view of the Blue Ridge Mountains

Jason Bertkay lives with his spouse, Judy, and has two grown sons. Judy, is in charge of photographs, while Jason is in charge of plants. They also motor down the Skyline Drive in Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains,a.o..

texan-crescentspot-butterfly-

The Texan Crescentspot photo by “bybio” the Back yard biology

We also can find a team of a mother, retired biology professor – former biology major, nurse daughter and blogger who can offer us some nice pictures. Even though the landscape looks (and feels) arid, southern Arizona seems to be a mecca for butterflies, perhaps because of the diversity of vegetation and flowers there, and they are able to have us enjoy those and many other animals and flowers in their region.

Chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs)

An Old Friend Returns – male Chaffinch – Pete Hillman

An other photographer who let us look often at his front and rear gardens is Pete Hillman, whom we mentioned already in earlier posts. Photography is his main hobby, but he does know to use a good eye and can give us close-ups of things most people even do not notice when walking around.  He knows the way of recording the beauty and wonders he discovers within nature. Most of the species found on his site were observed in the county of Staffordshire, England, where he lives, whilst others are from around various locations in the UK.

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brp-foggy-autumn-01-copy

Foggy Autumn Road by Rebecca Gillum whose gypsy soul keeps her searching

alum-cave-hoar-frost-01-copy

Winter comes early to the mountains. Rime ice covered trees in Smoky Mountain National Park. – Rebecca Gillum

From the road we also get lovely pictures from Rebecca Gillum. She knows the limitations of life and is content but is able to catch that moment in time and to present it for eternity. {So I Like Best of All Autumn} In her life she want to be willing
to be dazzled — to cast aside the weight of facts, and like Mary Oliver maybe even
to float a little above this difficult world. {To Be Dazzled}

We hope you too may be dazzled finding such nice photographs. Whilst the animals may have a well-defined hunting ground that the photographers are familiar with, they shall need patience to catch it, enabling to place that magic they saw in a moment for us to discover on a two dimensional plate.

A marmot seen on top of Mount Dana, Yosemite, ...

A marmot seen on top of Mount Dana, Yosemite, CA, USA. The road in the background is Tioga Pass Road. (Edited version of original: sharpened and curve adjustment by jjron). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Please do find to read

Get the lenses out to getting closer again

Looking at Flowers through a Macro Lens

Birds, Birds Everywhere

2016 Wildlife Photographer of the Year

8 Reasons We’re Looking Forward to Springtime Photography

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Find the interesting sites

  1. Cindy Knoke + on Pinterest
  2. Rabirius whom you also can follow on Pinterest
  3. Don Hong-Oai Bio
  4. Christopher Martin
  5. Art Wolfe
  6. Paul Nicklen
  7. Say It With A Camera – Mike Hardisty
  8. Garden in a city
  9. Rebecca Gillum
  10. Back yard biology

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Further reading

  1. In My Own Words Weekly Photo Challenge- Tiny
  2. Photography Journal Blog Weekly Photo Challenge- Tiny
  3. Weekly Photo Challenge – Small on Tiny – Celina2609’s Blog
  4. Our Own Little Walk of Fame – Aggie’s Amygdala
  5. Say Tiny! – Blog of Hammad Rais
  6. thephotoseye Tiny Thrills
  7. Another Tiny View – Rebecca Wiseman Portfolio
  8. Miss Jerz-tucky Weekly Photo Challenge- Tiny
  9. Words Like Honey Weekly Photo Challenge- Tiny
  10. deetravelssite.wordpress.com Tiny
  11. This is Another Story Color Transformation
  12. From Egg to Sheer Beauty – Micks Blog
  13. Doug Couvillion’s Photo Blog Weekly Photo Challenge- Transmogrify
  14. Sea Play Photography Weekly Challenge- Transmogrify
  15. XingfuMama My little pumpkins don’t do scary
  16. Crafting Photolog Weekly Photo Challenge- Transmogrify
  17. Mataro Photographs Halloween Transmogrification
  18. Nature & Travel Photos WPC – Transmogrify
  19. Let the Images Speak Transmogrify
  20. The Land Slide Photography Time
  21. Mr. Finch
  22. Photographs from the Edge- Review
  23. On the Hunt
  24. Take Away
  25. A Twist of Moss
  26. DX vs. FX cameras for wildlife photography
  27. Breaking It Down
  28. Of Fairytales
  29. butterflies in the desert?
  30. An Alien World #2
  31. Land of Lilliput
  32. Common Greenshield Lichen
  33. Pawpaw Sphinx
  34. This Way and That
  35. Charming smile
  36. Birds of the Texas Gulf Coast – Common Nighthawk
  37. Great Horned Owl
  38. Friday’s Frenzied Flights
  39. “I’ve Got To Tell Everybody About This!”
  40. Limb with a View
  41. Caribou in Newfoundland
  42. Even More Jelly ear
  43. Golden Tanager (Tangara arthus)
  44. A photographer’s eagle eye
  45. Into the Sunset
  46. A Dazzle of Zebra, a Journey of Giraffe and a Crash of Rhino
  47. Best Camera Trap Captures – October 2016
  48. Camdeboo – The Green Valley In The Great Thirstland
  49. Up Close!
  50. Pure Magnificence
  51. Octoberfest 2016
  52. Wild November Sky
  53. Along the Rio Grande
  54. Fotografare animali selvatici con TriggerSmart
  55. One Left For The squirrels
  56. A Highland Cow
  57. Wings
  58. Beautiful Bracken
  59. Birds at the British Wildlife Centre
  60. Supermoon
  61. Supermoon #2
  62. Drones and Machine Learning Combine to identify, protect endangered sea cows
  63. Male Kestrel
  64. Riverside
  65. First Snow of the Season
  66. Muddy Ibis
  67. Hiding Place
  68. Tiny
  69. Crazy Legs
  70. Weekly Photo Challenge: Tiny
  71. Photographer Tim Plowden gets up close and personal with forest creatures
  72. In the presence of greatness
  73. Magpie
  74. About Mites And Ticks
  75. About Grasses, Sedges And Rushes
  76. Swallow
  77. Tiny friends
  78. Junco Junkie
  79. Dark Eye with a Catchlight
  80. This Beautiful Bird
  81. Bulrush

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Filed under Nature, Pictures of the World

Friday’s Quick Picks/Poem: Offerings

Today’s poem is by Cynthia Guenther Richardson, a retired addictions/mental health counsellor and also a manager of home care services for elderly folks, who has worked in the field of human services for thirty years. She believes that language can illuminate, even renew life. She lets nature guides her in enrichment of body, mind and soul.
Seeking serenity is a way of life for her, a nourishment she cannot live well without. She writes

It may have been intensified by troublesome times as a child and young adult but it has nonetheless been a natural impulse as long as I can remember. In any case, it is a powerful key to a kind of magic guidebook for living richly. Why wouldn’t I use it all the time? {A Master Key to Contentment}

In her texts she might ask us to come to see order in the messy jumble of life, and renewed creation stirring in the design of every universal interaction.

Like pebbles tossed into water, nature’s actions and reactions are a demonstration of exquisite unity and symbiosis. And in human connections–slight as a fast second on the street or ongoing as a long partnership – there are various manifestations of energy exchanged, networks of coexistence revealed. {A Master Key to Contentment}

When looking at life she recognises

It’s a numinous life we are born with and into, and its mystical ways seem to me at once ordinary and exotic. All we have to do is turn around to see evidence of a stupendous wisdom. Deep beauty. Even when there is tragedy to throw us off. Even when there is rancorous pain that wars with a need for kind relief. {A Master Key to Contentment}

That is what we ask our readers, to look around them, to see the beauty of nature and if they would not mind even come to see the Hand behind it all, coming to see the Mighty Power of the Divine Creator.

In the midst of the odd wilderness of humanness we may look at man in that huge universe, a world which can fill us with so many things are can let us feel so small.

For today’s writer

Thirst fills me
with a hunger
for small exquisites
which do not rend
the hearts of humans
nor our collective body.
Let me savor any common psalm
to goodness this world has made,
follow paths of ubiquitous light,
stay the cynic for a moment of wonder
so we may wield our will to spare its virtue. {Friday’s Passing Fancies/Poem: Goodness of this World}

Goodness of this World – Photo by Cynthia Guenther Richardson

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Preceding articles

Here and Now

The natural beauties of life

Looking at Autumn

Sensitive trees for insensitive man

Showing the beauties of nature

Winter and Spring wonders of nature showing the Master’s Hand

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Additional reading

  1. Human beings and creation
  2. Taking care of mother earth
  3. Tu B’Shvat, the holiday of the trees
  4. Time to consider how to care for our common home
  5. The Presence of God

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Further reading

  1. Thoughts about Gates
  2. An Alien World #2
  3. Magical Sun Pillar
  4. Land of Lilliput
  5. Night’s Innocence
  6. I Just Know There’s One In This Group Asking ‘Are We There Yet?’
  7. Remember When…
  8. Heaven on earth
  9. Perspectives in Immersion and Reality

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Tales for Life

walking-again-001 Photos by Cynthia Guenther Richardson

The tenor of life may seem
to be thin, reedy, misaligned,
a shriek, a gasp amid muted din,
sudden ruptures in connection
that will not relay joy. Yet here
we remain, humans among all others,

with myriad moments and settings
for mystery and mindfulness
to release a sweep of harmony.
I say Peace, my soul, be well moved
and please may peace follow
you and you and more than you.

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by | 2016/11/19 · 1:22 pm

2016 Wildlife Photographer of the Year

By the English daily newspapers we may find The Guardian which has an eye for the way human beings fit in the universe and how we can look at what is around us. They have in the week several themes looking at a certain aspect around building up the human being and about man’s relation with his environment.

For them it is necessary that man does something seriously to avoid climate change bringing us down. Without a balanced, comparative assessment of strategies to align energy use and industry with inescapable climate action, we won’t be able to choose the best possible future. Man also has to come to see how nature is an essential part making it possible for us to live nicely.

Stretching to a full harvest

Stretching to a Full Harvest by Dan Frugalberg, talking about God Who tests us beyond our expectation but never beyond our strength.

Materialism in all its ghastly guises is pulling man down. To get them to better senses we need to show man the beauty of what is already there provided by the Divine Creator. We are pleased that there are also several bloggers on the net who appreciate what is around them and who do not want to keep it just for themselves but want to share it on their blogs which are available in a lot of countries. We can recommend a.o. Cindy Knoke, Dan Frugalberg, Pete Hillman and Purple Rays (Jonathan Udo Ndah) who present regularly an insight on what nature has to offer to mankind. On the net several dreamers with some creativity in writing, who love nature and who are feeling very close to it, can be found. One such person who enjoys life and want to share his arts with each other brings the blog Magic nature poem. He recognises that we are are surrounded by energetic creatures and writes

Humans, animals, plants, earth, universe within planets, suns, stars, moons, everything.
We are all parts of something  very big.
Everyone is a part of a very big energy.
We all seem to be seperate
But that is not true.
We are all connected by our energies.
A network consisting of our individual energies.
We fulfill the universe. {Energy #4}

20150522_183625

Flower ball by Magic nature poem

While the world goes around and around we have to find our position in it, making sure that we are not pulled down by the ravishing electronic speed and pushing commercial consumer society, where people live in a world, which lives faster and faster. In that world we have to stand strong on our feet, with our mind focussing on the right things. In that hectic life we do have to find moments to enjoy nature, to watch colours changing, flowers growing, animals jumping or flying around.

It is for people who want to reach their dreams, their plans that such writers and photographers may bring something enlightening. On this site we can not bring many photographs because our funds our very limited (not to say non-existent) but we would love to recommend to enjoy watching the above mentioned sites and the links we regularly offer you (our readers).

Each year the media looks at the magnitude of photo’s made and newspapers and press agencies present their photographer of the year.

Friday opened the Wildlife Photographer of the Year 52 exhibition at the Natural History Museum in London before touring internationally.

American photographer Tim Laman was named winner of the prestigious annual competition for his image Entwined Lives, showing a critically endangered Bornean orangutan in the Indonesian rainforest. The award is given for a story told in just six images, which are judged on their story-telling power as a whole as well as their individual quality.

Here you can view the winning images selected by the international jury. Wildlife Photographer of the Year champions ethical photography. Images are chosen for their artistic composition, technical innovation and truthful interpretation of the natural world > Gallery 2016

Adult and young awards

Browse the award-winning images from across the competition

Adult awards

Tim LamanTim Laman, USA
Website: www.timlaman.com

Tim is a field biologist and wildlife photojournalist with a reputation for returning from the wild with shots of nearly impossible subjects. His pioneering research in the rainforest canopy led to a PhD from Harvard University and the first of many articles for National Geographic magazine. His work has garnered numerous awards, including many in Wildlife Photographer of the Year.

 

  • Paradise performance
  • Night eyes
  • Sunrise performance
  • Banner advertising
  • Spellbinder
  • Heart-stopping show
  • The pole dancer
  • The sensitive mover
  • Entwined lives
  • When mother knows best
  • Road to destruction
  • Pursued by fire
  • Motherless

>Young awards

Gideon Knight

Gideon Knight, UK

Gideon’s interest in nature began in his garden and soon spread to his local park and further afield. From the first moment he paid attention to nature, the natural world has never failed to amaze him. He hopes to have a future in conservation as a wildlife photographer to help raise awareness through photography.

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Find also to read:

  1. Nature photography – Landscape photographers
  2. Underwater photographers –Underwater photography
  3. 2016 wildlife photographer of the year – winners in pictures
  4. Conventional thinking will not solve the climate crisis
  5. Satellite Eye on Earth: September 2016 – in pictures
  6. Environment section of The Guardian

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Further related

  1. How to Be a Professional Outdoor & Nature Photographer
  2. Conservation Photography
  3. Wildlife Photographer
  4. Wildlife Photographer – extraordinary things that happen behind the lens
  5. Rakesh Sahai – Well known Indian wildlife photographer passes away
  6. Photographing Wild Alaska and Japan’s Winter Wildlife, with Robert O’Toole
  7. Nature Photographer of the Day – John Shaw
  8. New on 500px : Wildlife Photographer by Philippe-De-Bruyne by Philippe-De-Bruyne
  9. Longtime National Geographic photographer Steve Winter explains the umbrella effect of predator preservation
  10. Joe Riis
  11. It is My Enthusiasm for Wildlife that Drew Me to Photography: Anuroop Krishnan
  12. She Married Her Stalker – Wildlife and Photography
  13. Picture Parade One Hundred and Thirty-two
  14. Picture Parade One Hundred and Thirty-Three
  15. dil aj kal camera…
  16. First Day in the Water – Wildlife Photography
  17. Infographic: How to photograph Lions
  18. Art Of Wildlife Photography with Tom Mangelsen
  19. Nature Photography Color Workflow Revealed with Christopher Dodds
  20. Night Photography – Tips for Perfecting Your Night Shots
  21. Advanced Photography: Landscapes | Landscape 101
  22. What are you looking at?
  23. Living in harmony
  24. Misleading names
  25. Tsavo Man-Eaters strike again
  26. The decline of the Red Colobus Monkey
  27. Yellowstone & Grand Tetons: A Different Perspective
  28. Vervet monkeys deserve a chance
  29. How big is the illegal wildlife trade?
  30. Charges: mock or real?
  31. Giants of the plains
  32. Highly revered, highly endangered
  33. Majestic Soarer
  34. Giddy up, Saddle Bill
  35. Pocket-sized Antelope
  36. Rock Jumper
  37. Tea and Gaur
  38. Wild Radish
  39. Meet the Slugs – Stinging Rose Caterpillar
  40. Amidst The Autumn Oak Leaves
  41. Red Bellied Marmot
  42. Common Scorpionfly
  43. Trust your future
  44. Cream Autumn Berries
  45. Moose on the Loose: Waterton Lakes National Park, Canada
  46. Yosemite National Park: Phenomenal Splendor
  47. Mangiare … a Venezia!

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Filed under Cultural affairs, Ecological affairs, Headlines - News, Nature, Pictures of the World

Ghosts of the mountains endangered big cat

In many countries certain animals are still being considered a threat for the population or for their food.  Lots of people consider wild animals as a menace instead of looking for a way to live in harmony with them.

Central Asia knows their “ghosts of the mountains” which are killed by farmers in retaliation for attacks on livestock and 20% are trapped by snares set for other creatures. Another 20% are killed for the illegal fur trade, though pelts from snow leopards killed for other reasons are often sold on.

Snow leopard

Poachers aren’t the main problem for the snow leopard – Munkhtogtokh Ochirjav, WWF Mongolia

Figure of 220-450 annual deaths could be even higher, as killings by poachers or farmers often go undetected in the remote mountains of central Asia

As few as 4,000 snow leopards are thought to remain in the mountains of central Asia.
As few as 4,000 snow leopards are thought to remain in the mountains of central Asia. Photograph: Klaus Honal/Getty Images/age fotostock RM

Map of Central AsiaHundreds of snow leopards are being killed every year across the mountains of central Asia, threatening the already endangered big cat, according to a new report.

Numbers have fallen by a fifth in the last 16 years, making it that there are only an estimated 4,080-6,590 snow leopards in the wild, listed as endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) because their population is suspected to have declined by 20% over the past 16 years in the 12 mountainous Asian countries they inhabit.

Rishi Sharma, leader of wildlife charity WWF’s snow leopard programme and co-author of the global wildlife trade monitoring network non-governmental organisation Traffic says

“It’s a completely new insight, and provides a very important point for discussion on how to ensure snow leopards are protected.”

She warns

“More than half the killing is not for illegal trade as such, so as long as we don’t address these issues affecting local communities, it will continue.”

But between 220 and 450 are killed each year, found the report from , the wildlife trade monitoring network, published on Friday ahead of a meeting on the crisis at the UN in New York. The number could be much higher, the NGO warned, as killings in remote mountain areas often go undetected.

WWF works to reduce human-leopard conflict, increase anti-poaching efforts, and protect the fragile snow leopard habitat.

The snow leopards have evolved to live in some of the harshest conditions on Earth. They scale the great, steep slopes of mountains in Central Asia,including the Himalayan Mountains, with ease, blending into the landscape. But these majestic, endangered cats face many threats including habitat loss from climate change, reduced prey, poaching, and retaliatory killings.

a snow leopard on a mountain

Seized snow leopard pelts

Pelts are sold by both hunters and herders – Tessa McGregor

Skins being the main Snow Leopard product type in trade (78%), the primary motive for
buyers appears to be for display, with some observations of skins hanging on walls in homes and
restaurants, as well as stuffed taxidermy specimens.
Priced in the thousands of US dollars, skins have been described as a “symbol of wealth and power.” However, there probably exists very little in the way of a definable consumer segment deliberately seeking out such items. They are most likely
purchased opportunistically – “impulse buys” – and most consumers probably only buy one in their lifetime. Once in a home, the illegal possession has very low probability of detection, and moreover law enforcement authorities may be reluctant to investigate in such situations. The purchase itself also has a low probability of detection, as indicated by the sharp decline in observed numbers of Snow Leopard skins being offered for sale. While growing personal wealth in Asia has been highlighted as a primary driver of illegal wildlife trade, poverty is also recognized as a driver, and the Snow Leopard trade may be more driven by rural people in Snow Leopard habitat attempting to make money and make up for livestock losses to predators than by wealthy people placing orders for luxury household decorations. Unlike the demand-driven Tiger trade (Annex 2), to which it otherwise bears many similarities, the market for Snow Leopards may be more a function of supply, and actions should focus on the communities living near Snow Leopards to reduce incentives to poach and sell. This notion is reflected in the aphorism behind the title of this report: an ounce of prevention equals a pound of cure. Preventing livestock losses, offsetting the costs of losses and improving community support for Snow Leopard conservation are the most important approaches to tackling the problem of Snow Leopard trafficking.
Snow leopards their thick grey and yellow-tinged fur, with solid spots on their head, neck and lower limbs and rosettes over the rest of the body attracts many women, who love to wear that warm skin. for the design they should know there are other alternatives with modern synthetic yarn. The natural breathing warmth, we do agree can not yet be brought by the synthetic material, but here in the West such deep warmth is not necessary because it doe snot get so cold.

Argali (Ovis ammon), the largest living wild sheep, native to the highlands of Central Asia. Argali is a Mongolian word for “ram.” There are eight subspecies of argali. {Encyclopaedia Britannica}

These beautiful wild cats are known as the “ghost of the mountains” because of their solitary and elusive nature. Since it is so rare to see two snow leopards together, there actually is no term for a group of snow leopards. They are capable of killing prey up to three times their own weight and eat blue sheep, Argali wild sheep, ibex, marmots, pikas, deer and other small mammals. The animals which snow leopards typically hunt — such as the Argali sheep — are also hunted by local communities.

Lots of people do forget that it is often by their own actions that wild animals come closer to the human habitat or come to find food by people. In Central Asia like in other parts of the world wild animals their natural prey becomes harder to find because man over-hunting. Snow leopards are often forced to kill livestock for survival, in many cases leading to retaliatory killings of snow leopards by local farmers or herders.

Machhapuchhare, a peak in the Great Himalaya Range, north-central Nepal.

Machhapuchhare, a peak in the Great Himalaya Range, north-central Nepal.

Hunting, habitat loss, retaliatory killings, poaching and climate change are the biggest threats that snow leopards face. Snow leopard habitat range continues to decline from human settlement and increased use of grazing space. An other factor where humans are the cause of the disturbance in nature is pollution and climate change. Climate change poses perhaps the greatest long-term threat to snow leopards. Impacts from climate change could result in a loss of up to 30% of the snow leopard habitat in the Himalayas alone.

It is not because we are living far away from their habitat we can not do anything to help those endangered species.

People all over the world could let their voice been heard. They could ask governments in the 12 countries across the leopard’s range to  increase the funds available to compensate herders whose animals are killed and to educate them, showing good ways of keeping nature in balance. all over the world people could help to build up funds to protect the animals and to help the population to receive extra materials to strengthen the pens, or corrals, where they keep their animals at night.

Focusing on herders – the bedrock of the local economy – also makes sense in regions where it is hard for rangers to protect leopards.

“These are very remote areas, so getting information on what’s going on and enforcement is very difficult,”

says Sharma.

“That’s why we need to focus more on community-based models, not just enforcement.”

snow leopard blends into landscape

David_lawson_wwf_uk

Snow leopards play a key role as both top predator and as an indicator of the health of their high-altitude habitat. If snow leopards thrive, so will countless other species.

WWF’s work focuses on reducing human-leopard conflict and rural development, education for sustainable development, stopping mining in fragile snow leopard habitat, and the control of illegal wildlife trade. WWF also works with local communities to curb retaliatory kills by providing innovative solutions to mitigate human-snow leopard conflict.

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Adopt a Snow LeopardAdopt a Snow Leopard

You can support WWF (WWF Europe) which works with local people and supports research and habitat conservation projects to protect these beautiful cats throughout their range.

Make a symbolic snow leopard adoption to help save some of the world’s most endangered animals from extinction and support WWF’s conservation efforts. In Belgium you may deduct your contribution from your income and for the adoption of an animal you can give once whatever you like or contribute a certain amount monthly.

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Save Europe’s nature

 
	© WWF

The EU Nature Directives protect over 26,000 nature areas and 1,000 species. They are under scrutiny since October 2013, when European Commission announced the fitness check. Here’s what is at stake

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Please do find to read:

  1. An Ounce of Prevention: Snow Leopard Crime Revisited – by Kristin Nowell, Juan Li, Mikhail Paltsyn and Rishi Kumar Sharma, Traffic Report
  2. Where do snow leopards live? And nine other snow leopard facts
  3. Hundreds of snow leopards being killed every year, report warns
  4. Hundreds of endangered wild snow leopards are killed each year

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Further reading

  1. Yara
  2. Tajikistan 2016
  3. Ghost of the Mountain
  4. Dailies: Snow Leopard
  5. Daily Cuteness by
  6. The Snow Leopards of Zhaxilawu Temple
  7. Snow leopards and sustainability
  8. Ramble 123: 5 reasons why snow leopards are my spirit animals
  9. Born in China (2017): New Trailer For Snow Leopard, Panda & Monkey Documentary From Disneynature
  10. Tracking the mystery of snow leopard populations
  11. Hundreds of snow leopards being killed every year, report warns
  12. The Cry of the Icemark by Stuart Hill
  13. Cambridge’s postgraduate pioneers
  14. It’s Saturday!
  15. Get wild in the city: The Saint Louis Zoo
  16. Weirdos at Korkeasaari – Helsinki Zoo
  17. Central Park Zoo
  18. Telos is in Trouble: Lucy the T-rex and the Snow Leopards
  19. Save Endangered Snow Leopards and Their Habitat
  20. Help me save snow leopards!
  21. Wild Animals 
  22. Get Wild for Wildlife!
  23. tiger cubs
  24. Amur Leopards
  25. Bobcat Invasion
  26. I am not wearing camoflague
  27. Interesting facts about lions.
  28. Destination #2 : Refuge Pageau
  29. Wild Animal Training: A Glance at Circuses and Hediger’s Viewpoint
  30. Animals Don’t Belong At The Circus
  31. National Animal Safety and Protection Month
  32. Surfin’ Safari
  33. “TripAdvisor.com ends bookings to animal attractions”
  34. Take Care of the Animals!
  35. Lions, Tigers & Bears…Oh my!!! I ❤️ you all Ueno!!🇯🇵✌🏽️🐼🐯🦁
  36. Bald Eagle Rescued After Getting Trapped In Car’s Grill — CBS San Francisco
  37. This Real-Life Revenant Was Attacked By A Bear Twice In One Morning
  38. Grandview Aquarium, China
  39. Keep The Fox Hunting Ban
  40. Report Animal Cruelty

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Filed under Activism and Peace Work, Ecological affairs, Nature, Pictures of the World

Recollections of the Day From My Garden…

The semi-retired ex-professional Western Australian musician becoming a copywriter with one of Australia’s largest marketing companies for 10 years, Nia Maharg, spends most of time writing fiction, poetry and about topics that interest him, looking at lingering clouds which dance in wisps of tangerine softness {Sublimity…} but also dreames his soulgrew wings and took flight {Broken Night of Dreams!}

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Nia Maharg

28171181641_97db5bac40_z.jpg

by Nia Marharg.

Darkness drapes itself over light

and drags another day to a close,

folds it away in a bank of distant dreams.

As if no rule, no-compass scheme lay before its eyes,

Good and evil people passed.

Good and evil people entered.

Someone said something profound at midday

forgotten by evening…

The sea pounded the shoreline with its massive waves.

The wind belted the lime stone face of Mount Snape.

First light of sun revealed

red rose blooms laden with dew,

petals with sun-lit crystals,

in my garden… delicate.

.Every flower is an honoured dinner guest

waiting to be invited to nature’s table…

shrubs and flowers healthily yielding their beauty and fragrance.

 Paths in the garden lead on to gravelled beaten tracks.

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Filed under Nature, Poetry - Poems, Re-Blogs and Great Blogs