Category Archives: Political affairs

Signs of the times – As the Day approaches

“And at that time shall Michael stand up, the great prince which standeth for the children of thy people:
and there shall be a time of trouble, such as never was since there was a nation even to that same time” (Daniel 12:1).

The snippets below reflect upon signs of the times to inform and give warning of the trials and dangers to believers in this “time of trouble.”
Let us be aware of the growing threat to our faithful “endurance to the end,” that we might prepare ourselves to act and respond wisely when tempted or confronted.

Americans Have Little Confidence in Religion, Congress, and the News Media:

Gallup first conducted their “Confidence in Institutions” poll in 1973. Americans have very little confidence in organized religion, Congress or news from the TV, Internet, or newspapers, according to the latest Confidence in Institutions poll. Only 38% of Americans said that they had a “great deal” or “quite a lot” of confidence in the church or organized religion. Conservatives and Republicans showed more confidence with 52% and 48% confidence respectively. Liberals and Democrats showed less confidence with 31% of Democrats and 21% of liberals expressing confidence. From 1973 to 1985, American confidence in organized religion was higher than confidence in any other institution at above 60%. A sharp fall in confidence in organized religion (down to 45%) was recorded in 2002 when an expose was published by the Boston Globe revealing that Catholic Church leaders had been aware of serial sex abuse by priests and didn’t take strong action.

Confidence in Congress has consistently been relatively low and this year that trend continued with only 11% of Americans expressing a “great deal” or “quite a lot” of confidence in Congress. Confidence in newspapers also ranked low in 2019, with only 23% of Americans expressing a “great deal” or “quite a lot” of confidence in print media. Only 20% expressed confidence in TV news, and only 16% expressed confidence in Internet news.
The criminal justice system and big business also have low-confidence ratings, with only 24% of respondents expressing confidence in the criminal justice system and 23% of respondents expressing confidence in big business. Americans expressed the strongest level of confidence in the military (73%), small business (68%) and police (53%), continuing a trend of majority levels of confidence in those three institutions for the past two decades.

Jerusalem Post, July 14, 2019 Comment:

This loss of confidence is but another confirmation that we are living in the time of the end. As Jesus prophesied,

“And there shall be signs in the sun, and in the moon, and in the stars [governmental authority; ecclesiastical authority; princes / governors] and upon the earth distress of nations, with perplexity; the sea and the waves [the people and nations in rebellion] roaring (Luke 21:25).

Giant Statue of Molech Now Sits at the Entrance to the Colosseum in Rome –

A gigantic statue of a pagan Canaanite deity known as “Molech” has been erected at the entrance to the Colosseum. In ancient times, those that served Molech would sacrifice their children to him. Now a massive statue of this pagan idol is the centerpiece of a new “archaeological exhibition” at the Roman Colosseum (the same Colosseum where countless numbers of Christians were martyred for their faith). What makes this even more shocking is that the Colosseum is controlled by the Vatican. The large-scale exhibition, titled Carthago: The immortal myth, runs until March 29, 2020.

The statue of Moloch was erected nine days prior to the opening of the Amazon Synod, which was plagued with controversy from the beginning after a ceremony in the Vatican Gardens involving the pagan goddess “Pachamama” was held in the presence of Pope Francis and top-ranking prelates.

Image
People bow to Pachamama during pagan rite in Vatican Gardens prior to opening of Amazon Synod, Oct. 4, 2019.

In the ceremony, participants prostrated themselves before wooden statuettes of the fertility goddess indigenous to South America. The statuettes were kept as part of an exhibit in the Church of Santa Maria in Traspontina until they were thrown into the Tiber by Austrian Catholic Alexander Tschugguel on Oct. 21. Afterward, one copy of the mass-produced figures was kept in the church.

The pagan god Moloch next to an exhibition board in the Colosseum, Rome, September 27, 2019, placed in that prime spot so that everyone that entered into the Colosseum had to pass it. The image of Moloch is modeled on a representation of the child-devouring demon found in the 1914 Italian silent film Cabiria. In the film the idol of Moloch, set up in a Punic temple, has a giant bronze furnace in his chest, into which hundreds of children are thrown. Cabiria, the heroine of the film, is threatened with this fiery fate.

Some Catholics are distressed that the pagan god Moloch has been erected at the entrance to the Colosseum, which is one of many amphitheatres where Christians were tortured and executed for the entertainment of the pagan crowds.

“It was like they put Moloch there to mock the sacred place where the holy martyrs spilled their blood for the True Faith!”

The following comment from Breaking Israel News(11-7-2019) reads,

“There is no way that such a thing could be done without permission from the highest levels of the Vatican. The Colosseum of Rome is owned by the Vatican, specifically the Diocese of Rome, also called the Holy See. If anyone wants to do anything there, they must get permission from the office of the Diocese of Rome. This exhibition, called ‘Cathargo: the immortal myth’ could not be held there unless permission was granted at high levels.”

In Jeremiah 32:35 we are told that the people of Israel began worshipping Molech as they fell away from the Lord, And they built the high places of Baal, which are in the valley of the son of Hinnom, to cause their sons and their daughters to pass through the fire unto Molech;

which I commanded them not, neither came it into my mind, that they should do this abomination, to cause Judah to sin.

In Leviticus 18:21, the people of Israel are specifically warned against sacrificing their children to this idol,

And thou shalt not let any of thy seed pass through the fire to Molech, neither shalt thou profane the name of thy God: I am the Lord

Over the past few years, there seems to have been a concerted effort to put up symbols from ancient pagan religions in key locations all over the globe. This includes erecting the “arch of Baal” in both Washington D.C. and New York City in 2016.

The original Arch of Palmyra in Syria was the ancient arched entrance to the Temple of Baal. It was destroyed in 2015- by ISIS ironically enough. An outfit named the Institute of Digital Archaeology reconstructed the arches using 3-D printers. It was unveiled on April 19, the occult holiday of Beltane, the beginning of a 13-day period known as ‘the Blood Sacrifice to the Beast’. This took place at the 2016 UNESCO World Heritage Fair in Trafalgar Square in London.
Next was a UN World Heritage event in New York City in September. After that, a global summit in Dubai. Then, off to the G7 in Florence, Italy. Then it went to Washington DC to catch the back end of the sacrifice to the beast, and to form that Baal bond.

Prophecy News Watch, November 11, 2019 Comment:

There’s a modern movement to honor as well as embrace witchcraft and pagan deities, resurrecting religious practices of idolatry and superstition centered around the polytheistic, nature worshipping religions of pre-Christian Europe. A significant portion of today’s pagan converts were raised in Christian families.
By embracing the title “pagan” these converts express their break from Christianity, though it’s uncertain just what the allure to adopt idolatry and superstition may be.

Modern day practicing pagan sects of various orders are associated with such practices as worshipping nature, chanting, dancing, spells, sacrifices, festivals, etc. (see Wikipedia –Modern Paganism)

September 28, 2018 by YC Nightingale – Democracy has a new door, or Arch. The seat of the free world is represented by the “democracy” of the United States. This happens at the US Capital building at the National Mall. The Arch is representing this new democracy than will then be brought to the Hague, the International Courts. – The US Capitol building signifying that the womb is the entrance that takes you through the Arch of Triumph or gateway/portal that leads you to the obelisk or Baals shaft. There is a disgusting sexual element to all of this ritual and this is why they want the public to touch it and go in and out from the Arch. They are having a union with Jupiter, Sophia and their lord, Baal. It is their demonic trinity.

154 Nations Reject Israel’s Biblical Connection to the Temple Mount:

The United Nations gave preliminary approval for a resolution that calls the Temple Mount by its Muslim name exclusively –Haram al-Sharif. The resolution passed at the UN’s Fourth Committee in an overwhelming turn-out of 154-8. The vote featured 14 abstentions as well as 17 absences. It was one of eight Anti-Israel resolutions approved last week. An expected 15 more anti-Israel resolutions are anticipating approval as well. Only Israel and the United States voted against all eight resolutions, although Australia, Canada, Guatemala, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, and Nauru joined them in voting against the Jerusalem texts. All of the twenty-eight EU member states backed the resolution…

The Acting US Deputy Representative to the United Nations responded to the resolution saying,

“We are disappointed that despite support for reform, member states continue to disproportionately single out Israel through these types of resolutions.”

She added,

“it is deplorable that the United Nations –an institution founded upon the idea that all nations should be treated equally –should be so often used by member states to treat one state in particular, Israel, unequally.”

Breaking Israel News, November 18, 2019

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  4. Vile language and behaviour plus little secrets
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  7. The Field is the World #4 Many who leave the church
  8. What Happened at Peor? Part 1
  9. Let the Triumphal Procession Begin | The Arch at the US Capital
  10. Coincidence? Arch of Baal Erected In DC 1 Day Before Kavanaugh Testified Before Congress
  11. The Arch Of Baal In Washington D.C.
  12. Paganism In The Western World, several current video examples: Paganism / BA’AL WORSHIP, Part 2
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  15. Why I left Catholicism and Became a Pagan
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a Vision of fierce idealism in a broken world

Leo Tolstoy.Leo Tolstoy knew plenty about the rank injustice, evil, and sheer brutishness that have dominated the world throughout history. He’d witnessed a public execution in Paris and had lived through the European revolutions of 1848, as well as the assassination of Tsar Alexander II, followed by the ultra-repressive regime of Alexander III.

By the end of the century, Tolstoy was reading daily newspaper reports about workers’ riots, bloody bombings by revolutionary terrorists, religious persecution, and pogroms.

And what counts is this:

Having lived through all of that, he never lost his faith in the possibility of goodness, of human promise.

In his seventies, Tolstoy asked to be buried on the spot where, as a boy, he and his brother Nikolai had discovered a little green stick — a stick on which they believed was inscribed the secret to universal happiness.

“And just as I believed then, that there is a little green stick, on which is written the secret that will destroy all evil in people, and give them great blessings,”

Tolstoy wrote in his Recollections (1902),

“so now I believe that such a truth exists and that it will be revealed to people and will give them what it promises.”

Tolstoy - War and Peace - first edition, 1869.jpgIn War and Peace, one of Tolstoy’s finest literary achievements, no character embodies the spirit of idealism more than Pierre Bezukhov, the big-hearted, bespectacled Russian count who at the beginning of the novel inherits the largest fortune in Russia. After that, he enters into a disastrous marriage, becomes a leading Freemason before growing disillusioned with its politics, botches his attempts to free the peasants on his estate, and eventually winds up as a French prisoner of war during Napoleon’s 1812 invasion of Russia.

Then, just when he thinks things can’t possibly get worse, Pierre is brought before a firing squad. Prepared to die, he discovers, miraculously, that he has been escorted there only as a witness. Still, the sight of the blindfolded factory worker being shot in the head (which Pierre well realizes might just as easily have been him) is enough to shatter his every illusion he’s ever had about his own power, every ounce of his faith in

“the world’s good order, in humanity’s and his own soul, and in God.”

Yet he survives, both physically and spiritually, and emerges from captivity neither cynical nor bitter, but with a redoubled commitment to the ideals he has always believed in.

“I don’t say we should oppose this or that. We may be mistaken,”

He tells his wife after the war, upon returning from St. Petersburg, where Pierre has been trying to unite conservatives and liberals, who are at each other’s throats over the future direction of the country.

“What I say is: let’s join hands with those who love the good, and let there be one banner — active virtue.”

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There are no righteous wars

Ezra Pound wrote in his poems,
“there are no righteous wars”.
Even more, what it should be understood is that the war of a nation against another nation is always an hoax.
People are completely indifferent to national quarries:
the real thing is the conflict between opposite groups of power.
~From Fondazione M: What Israel?

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Do Governments and Nations Lie?

For sure we live in a non-truth era. If it is the Post-truth era, will be an other matter, because that implies the world has already sean a Truth-era.

A great problem we do have to face today is that the news-gathering and news-spreading is full of fake or false news, and worse of all that many fall in the trap of those news-spreaders. And multiply the spreading by resending it by social media.

Zion, Sion and Zsion Menue, News and Journal

Do Governments and Nations Lie?

For hiding and protecting their crimes and criminals?

Jesus was offered the kingdom over the whole world, if he only would commit a crime against the then Roman cesar as an act of worship to Antijehovah.

This is one law of power: you do not receive power over other humans freely but only by being designated by more powerful persons or by disadvantaging at least one competitor.

Are we living in the Post Truth Era?

Only if we trust inferior preliminary gods more then our supreme true ones.

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Ten simple rules to avoid negative effects of social media

Always keep your feet on the ground and do a reality check when encountering messages on the internet. Plus keep everything in perspective.

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To remember

Social media = the link that links us all in an ever expanding virtual community = much wider, bigger + beyond anyone’s control.

looking at selective best moments of friends, seemingly living better lives => feel low and depressed

Social media has some serious issues and it’s negative effects can’t be ignored. But we can’t avoid it’s use completely.

dependent on it for sharing information + reaching out to wider communities.

can’t avoid using it but definitely can avoid some of it’s negative effects.

ten simple rules to avoid negative effects of social media

Rule #1
Don’t take anything personally

Rule #2
Laugh at yourself

Rule #3
Do not indulge in unnecessary comparisons

Rule #4
There is no such thing as the perfect life

Rule #5
Curb your enthusiasm to share personal information at all cost

Rule #6
Never ever share anything when you’re feeling emotionally charged up

Rule #7
Keep a limit on the time you spend on social media

Rule #8
Use every setting available to minimize distractions

Rule #9
Acknowledge your feelings, even of jealousy and envy

Rule #10
Last but not the least, love your real life more than the virtual

Educated Unemployed Indian

“Distracted from distraction by distraction.”
~ T. S. Eliot

Social media has become the link, the link that links us all in an ever expanding virtual community. A community much wider, bigger and beyond anyone’s control.

It will make you feel popular one moment and deserted the next. It can leave you feeling quite lost if you don’t bring along your only defense-a sense of humour.

“Yet the best determining factor of how comfortable we are with ourselves, is our ability to laugh at ourselves.”
~Wes Adamson

A lot of people are of the opinion that social media tends to make people feel low and depressed. That makes sense; looking at the selective best moments of friends, seemingly living better lives will do that to anyone.

Social media has some serious issues and it’s negative effects can’t be ignored. But we can’t avoid it’s use completely.

We’re…

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The one that exploded the great American story that lay beneath it

 


Trump has not merely, at the behest of his supporters,
disrupted the status quo.
He has exploded the great American story that lay beneath it.
What makes Trump so difficult to write about is that he presents no story.
Like a cubist portrait, he changes your perception of reality by the minute.

~ In The Story Of Trump, There Is No story

 

> Read Here – Columbia Journalism Review

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Francis Fukuyama and ‘The End of History?’

image from BloggingHeads.tv podcast

American political scientist, political economist, and author Yoshihiro Francis Fukuyama in 2015

The American writer and political theorist Francis Fukuyama wrote

“Human beings never existed in a pre-­social state. The idea that human beings at one time existed as isolated individuals is not correct.”

In his seminal 1989 essay ‘The End of History?’ he also wrote

‘What we may be witnessing is the end point of mankind’s ideological evolution and the universalization of Western liberal democracy as the final form of human government.’

Fukuyama trying to convey silent messages through stories about the evolution of democratic societies he continued

‘With the fall of the Soviet Union the struggle for recognition, the willingness to risk one’s life for a purely abstract goal, the worldwide ideological struggle that called forth daring, courage, imagination, and idealism will be replaced by economic calculation, the endless solving of technical problems, environmental concerns, and the satisfaction of sophisticated consumer demands.’

The End of History and the Last Man.jpg

The End of History and the Last Man is a 1992 book by Francis Fukuyama, expanding on his 1989 essay “The End of History?”, published in the international affairs journal The National Interest.

Fukuyama did not suggest that the end of history meant the end of wars or conflicts, but rather that capitalism and Western-style liberal democracy were the culmination of human political development and would not, and could not, be transcended. He beliefs that the triumph of liberal democracy at the end of the Cold War marked the last ideological stage in the progression of human history. The initial political challenge having to escape beyond tribalism and the “tyranny of cousins”.

For Fukuyama, tribal organisation responds to structural imperatives in social evolution but also blocks the path to further development. The early account of the origins of state-like forms relies heavily on Lawrence Keeley’s military-focused argument in War Before Civilisation (1996) and does not consider the evidence assembled by Keith Otterbein in How War Began (2004): that warfare greatly declined in importance following the hunting to extinction of the larger mammals. Keeley himself grants that early settlement cultures, such as the Natufian,

“furnish no indication of warfare at all”. {Robin BlackburnThe Origins of Political Order: From Pre-Human Times to the French Revolution, By Francis Fukuyama}

We can see that in the West the majority prefers a capitalist system and in several industrialised countries people are a lot afraid of what smells social or communist. Fukuyama thinks that all states are going to adopt a form of capitalist liberal democracy. It was an argument contested from almost the moment he finished writing his essay.
The rise of Islamism, the unleashing of ethnic conflicts, the challenge posed by China – a myriad developments, his critics suggested, questioned the presumption of an end of history.

Donald Trump’s Presidential victory was one of the signs how politicians would easily be able to lure people in false ideas, by their words. The last few years we have seen a seemingly unstoppable rise of populist forces throughout Europe.

Many will probably see how in the quarter of a century since Fukuyama wrote his essay, politics, particularly in the West, has indeed shifted away from ‘ideological struggle’ towards

‘the endless solving of technical problems’.

The broad ideological divides that characterized politics for much of the past two hundred years have been eroded. Politics has become less about competing visions of the kinds of society people want than a debate about how best to manage the existing political system, a question more of technocratic management rather than of social transformation.

What might more come to an end is the believe of people in political systems and in politicians. Lots of people are convinced that politicians are not listening to them and are mostly just working for themselves and trying to get the best paid job.
The majority of politicians have lost connection with the ordinary people who want to feel as if they are justly recognised and that their voice can be heard. The last few years they feel more they are mocked at, nobody taking their voice seriously. Politicians should come to know that this desire to experience both personal and collective recognition is inescapable to the modern human condition.

Liberal democratic states that Fukuyama so vigorously defended in “The End of History” have not responded well to the challenges of pluralism.

After the collapse of the Soviet Union, few believed in an alternative to capitalism, not seeing that the Soviet Union was not really the best representative of communism, because it had more dictators than real communist leaders. Communist parties crumbled, while social democratic parties remade themselves, cutting ties to their traditional working class constituencies while reorienting themselves as technocratic parties. Trade unions weakened and social justice campaigns eroded.

It seemed that not only in Europe social movements and political organizations eroded,  and the far-right movements gained space. Local people wanted to become recognised and wanted to look upon social change through the lens of their own cultures, identities, goals and ideals.

Many sections of the working class have found themselves politically voiceless at the very time their lives have become more precarious, as jobs have declined, public services savaged, austerity imposed, and inequality risen. Many also came to see all those immigrants as a danger for their own position, their jobs and income as well as being afraid of loosing their culture.

Having their world coming to an end.

Lots of people in charge of the working of society did not see the discontent many their votes expressed.

Prominent alt-rightists were instrumental in organising the “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Virginia in August 2017. Here, rally participants carry Confederate battle flags, Gadsden flags and a Nazi flag.

In Europe and America, people have become disaffected with the old order and felt more attraction for those who promised heaven on earth and for them “a great nation” again. Many of the opposition movements that give voice to that disaffection of the labourers, are shaped not by progressive ideals but by sectarian politics, and rooted in religious or ethnic identity. The Islamist AKP in Turkey or the Hindu nationalist BJP in India are the equivalents of the Front National in France or the alt right, far-right, white supremacist, white nationalist, white separatist, anti-immigration and antisemitic movement in America and Europe.

Those growing right-wing and far- or extreme-right-wing groups should make us aware of the severity of the present political situation. We are witnessing a globally disinformation movement which is creating more hatred and racism as well setting up people against others for wrong reasons.

The current tumult is the result of struggles for recognition that remain unshaped by progressive movements, of ideological struggles in a post-ideological world.

Demand for recognition of one’s identity is a master concept that unifies much of what is going on in world politics today. In his new book: Identity: The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment Francis Fukuyama looks at the new layers of meaning of the voters or citizen’s identity.

Fukuyama believes that the focus on self separates people from their communities. The demand for identity cannot be transcended and therefore people must begin to shape identity in a way that supports rather than undermines democracy.
When coming to know the self one can not ignore the connection with religious feelings. One aspect of wisdom is recognizing your need for The One Being outside man.

Christianity succeeds in diminishing family ties when the Church takes a strong stand against practices which enhanced the power of lineages such as cousin marriage, divorce, adoption and marriage to the widows of dead relatives. The looser family pattern favoured by the practices of Latin Christianity have the effect of channelling assets to the Church itself (eg through widows’ bequests). Fukuyama further urges that “contrary to Marx, capitalism was the consequence rather than the cause of a change in social relationships”. Yet he soon acknowledges that

“the most convincing argument for the shift has been given by the social anthropologist Jack Goody“,

an authority whose work could be seen as a distinctive fruit of Cambridge Marxism. {Robin BlackburnThe Origins of Political Order: From Pre-Human Times to the French Revolution, By Francis Fukuyama}

Fukuyama has the idea that the individualistic sense of identity comes to the fore during periods of modernisation in which people fled from rural areas into the cities and were confronted with a mass of different dialects or languages, religions and cultures and were aware of a sense of the difference between where they were and where they are now. Today in some way many people seem to be lost or are so much afraid of such confrontation they do hope their politicians can solve that problem of difference between the inhabitants of their villages, cities and countries.

Fukuyama notes the ways in which questions of identity politics have come to be regarded as synonymous with the right. Donald Trump supporters are animated around the removal of Confederate statues and the president’s lack of defence to political correctness is a significant mobilising force on the right.

Intimidation and efforts to control people have become the present day norm for many politicians, who gain a lot of popularity because many fall for their lies. That virus threatening democracy has not only infected the United States but also the European Union. As such we may see that identity politics has become the political form of cultural fragmentation of these days, and is corrosive of some features of an effective democracy – social cohesion, talking with strangers and working across the aisle.

According to me the politicians do have to give an identity to the people again and have to show them that we all have more in common with each other than what divides us.

It is a “we” who are the same, and not a “we” who are strangers dwelling together despite our differences. {Jeff RichIdentity Crisis – some theses on identity politics}

The End of the End of History?

History shall continue and show how man tries to find different political solutions and ways to govern a country. Man shall have to find a way to make it that by the globalisation more and more people would be going to see the richness of a multicultural society, instead of fearing it.

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Read also

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  2. Declaration of war against Islam and Christianity
  3. Declining commitment to democracy : What’s going on around the world ?
  4. Collision course of socialist and capitalist worlds
  5. Subcutaneous power for humanity 2 1950-2010 Post war generations
  6. The Free Market (and all that) did not bring down the Berlin Wall
  7. Common Goods, people and the Market
  8. Pushing people in a corner danger for indoctrination and loss of democratic values
  9. Populism endangering democracy
  10. An European alliance or a populist alliance
  11. British Parliament hostage its citizens for even more months
  12. American social perception, classes and fear mongering
  13. United in an open society relying not on command and control but on freedom
  14. Capitalism and economic policy and Christian survey

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Further related

  1. The Origins of Political Order: From Pre-Human Times to the French Revolution, By Francis Fukuyama
  2. What Do We Mean When We Say Something Is Political? — Recommended Readings
  3. The Sisyphean Task at the Core of Identity Politics
  4. Fukuyama has a new book on identity
  5. Little Theories
  6. The Decline of Liberalism
  7. Identity
  8. Identity Crisis – some theses on identity politics
  9. We’re in This Together Now 
  10. Two Books by Francis Fukuyama
  11. What Fukuyama got right.
  12. From ‘End Of History’ To ‘End Of Democracy’ – Why Fukuyama Now Likes China
  13. “Echoing Margaret Thatcher’s dictum that ‘there is no alternative’ …
  14. Social Psychology and Religious Behavior
  15. Francis Fukuyama and technology
  16. Eurasianism: The Struggle For The Multi-Polar World

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He Becomes a Fool Through His Endless Desire

Eyes of the World

From Carl Jung’s Red Book,

He whose desire turns away from outer things, reaches the place of the soul. If he does not find the soul, the horror of the emptiness will overcome him, and fear will drive him with a whip lashing time and again in a desperate endeavor and a blind desire for the hollow things of the world. He becomes a fool through his endless desire, and forgets the way of the soul, never to find her again.

Lies

Liar

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The Weight of History

Europeans wonder how the percentage would be of people liking and disliking the actions and dignity of the 45th president of the U.S.A.

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Preceding

Shall the American again being put to the test

Yup

Odd American idea that giving money to political campaigns is free speech

Eyes of the World

A recent nighttime tour of Washington, DC, brought me to the front of the White House, where I paused to take the picture below. The building itself evokes strong feelings about the enormity of the occupant’s duty to the country and to all around the world affected by US policy.

Which, in turn, evokes feelings of disgust at the behavior of the current occupant. I am, by turns, angry, humiliated, and ashamed that this racist, buffoonish blowhard has the privilege of bearing the title he pretends to deserve. And to perform in such a foolish, reckless, and ignorant fashion only ensures that his will go down as the worst presidency in American history.

This is truly the worst America has to offer.

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Odd American idea that giving money to political campaigns is free speech

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