Category Archives: History

Culture War Christianity in American history

In this article, you might find our comments on our previously published articles about Culture War Christians

What Are The Culture Wars?

A History Of The Culture Wars

A Theology of Culture War Christianity

Beyond the Culture Wars


 

What are the Culture Wars?

Think of “culture” as a way of life. It is the sum total of all values, beliefs, and practices making up a communal existence. When God commissions newly formed humanity in Genesis 1 to “fill the earth and subdue it”, he sets men and women into the world with a cultural mandate. His plan was for a human society, united under his rule in the world, ruling with him over the Cosmos as his vice-regents. {What Are The Culture Wars?}

Karl Marx saw how main religion tried to lure people in the ban of the church by false doctrines. It is because the majority of people did not take the time to read the Bible that so many religious groups were able to get people following their false doctrines.

Regularly, people were so prayed for by those doctrines of those churches that they no longer faced the real thing because they preferred to float on those ideas of those churches. It had become so bad that Marx also realised that for many, religion was like an ‘opium for the people’. In lots of Christian and Islamic denominations, their church leaders managed to have their followers, following and worshipping a wrong god and not following the real Christ. since his time still not much has been changed, and there are still lots of false teachers and false prophets around. Marx was disturbed by the knowledge that he saw so many people around him falling for those false human teachings and giving their money away to those churches when there were so many people around them suffering. Marx also noted few dared to question, let alone challenge, church doctrines.

It also bothered several thinkers in the 19th century that the church made no attempt to defend the majority of their churchgoers or parishioners, and did not stand up against the exploitation of parishioners. For far too many centuries, the Roman Catholic Church itself had done everything possible to trot out money from the poorer population.

The German revolutionary, sociologist, historian, and economist, Karl Marx and his closest collaborator, the German socialist philosopher Friedrich Engels’ answer to the ills of society was according to some, just the opposite of the utopian dreamers’ answers. Mainly this, because the ideas of utopists (like Mr. Ampe) seem for many too far-fetched and unreachable. Though Marx and Engels found enough people who, like them, believed that one could change the way people lived and could come to a better world with less inequality. They, too, went for a better world.

Since World War I the world has evolved incredibly on all levels. Politically it was a time of trying out several political systems, getting more than once in a lot of problems and crises. The Western world clinched at the industrialisation and experienced mixed economies floating between all kinds of political thoughts. Even as the western world became less religious and the church got less of a grip on its citizens, the rich continued to control everything and did everything they could to maintain their power.

For

For him it is clear that Christ should be at the centre of Christianity. But he also expects something for those who call themselves Christian. He

When Jesus prayed,

“on earth as it is on heaven”

he was indicating his expectation and desire that the culture of Heaven becomes the culture of Earth by way of his Church. But does Culture War Christianity, the sort launched in the ’70s, contradict the nature of Jesus’ Kingdom?

So many people had looked forward to the 20th century, hoping that because of all the new inventions, brought forward by the Industrial Revolution, they would be able to create a world where everything would be much easier and giving them more time to relax. The century opened with great hope but also with some apprehension, for the new century marked the final approach to a new millennium. For many, humankind was entering upon an unprecedented era. The English novelist, journalist, sociologist, and historian H.G. Wells’s utopian studies, the aptly titled Anticipations of the Reaction of Mechanical and Scientific Progress upon Human Life and Thought (1901) and A Modern Utopia (1905), both captured and qualified this optimistic mood and gave expression to a common conviction that science and technology would transform the world in the century ahead.

Already before the seventies of the previous century there was something going wrong in the industrialised world. Even though many countries were allowed to offer independence back to their colonies, they continued to exploit people in their own countries. Even when churches wanted to present God in different ways over the years, people should know That God never changes. He will always be the same and keep to the same Plan He had already from the beginning of times.

The American pastor and current PhD candidate in Theological Ethics at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland, Jared Stacy 
wants to call our attention to this basic theological ethic:

The work of God’s rule spreading throughout the world in individual lives and communities will never contradict who God is.

We would have loved that, but reality shows something totally different. For centuries, the main Christian churches have chosen another path than the disciples of Christ. The majority of people preferred to keep to their heathen traditions and festivals and the Catholic and several Protestant churches followed them and made Jesus Christ (the Messiah) their god. As such, we must say there is a lot of contradiction in what people say God is. For many, He is not the God of Christ, Who is the God of Israel, but is a god who is part of a three-headed godship, the Trinity.

It is not just that difference of who God is and who Christ is that has brought division in the world of believers. The diversity of religious groups has also brought both confusion and discord. Coming closer to the 21st-century tension or strife resulting from a lack of agreement came to bring even more separation between the true followers of the Nazarene Jewish masterteacher Jeshua  ben Joseph (Jesus Christ) and the name-Christians who worship Jesus as their god and do not shy away from also worshipping all kinds of people they call saints, this while the One True God desires full recognition and worship.

We have the impression that the blog writer who also writes for platforms like NPR, the BBC, Current, and For the Church, does not see (or does not know) the multiple camps in Christendom. He only mentions two of them. He writes

To speak generally, mischaracterizations come from two camps. Let’s call one group “conscientious objectors” and the other, “vocal advocates”.

Some accuse conscientious objectors to the Culture Wars of believing that Christianity should have no influence in the public square. They slander these conscientious objectors as faithless & godless, or misrepresent them as conspiratorially hypocritical, secretly harboring a progressive political agenda.

On the other end of the spectrum, some conscientious objectors accuse vocal advocates of conflating Christianity with cultural power. This often leads them to slander vocal advocates as compromising sell-outs, or mischaracterize their advocacy & well-connected influence as grounded in an inherently complicit conservative agenda. No doubt, I believe there are instances of legitimate criticisms from boths sides in Christian spaces. But polarity abounds.

For him the polarizing gap between vocal advocates and conscientious objectors reveals a vast “no man’s land” in American evangelicalism. This is why he believes his series has pastoral and personal implications for all of us.

Because either you or someone you know is wandering the no man’s land as a refugee from the Culture Wars.

Many American evangelicals are proud that they (so-called) keep to The 10 Commandments, though all of them already sin against the first commandment, not keeping to The Only One True God, the Elohim Hashem Jehovah of hosts, the God above all gods.

David Hansen correctly says

“The majority of Americans will tell any pollster that they believe in the Ten Commandments. But only a small percentage of those people could even recite the Ten Commandment; and even a smaller percentage have any genuine interest in following them.” {The 10 Commandments in American Culture}

Lots of North Americans should seriously think about their religion and their faith. About that faith Stacy says there is a danger.

On a day of hope, we need a fresh reminder of the danger inherent in an embrace of Christian faith. {The Danger of Faith}

He points out the trap many Americans have fallen into.

It is American consumer Christianity that invites us to “make Jesus Lord of our lives”. This pitch makes Christ a commodity, leaving us—the consumer—with control. The resurrection and ascension is a coronation that happens apart from our consumer choice & control. {The Danger of Faith}

1909 painting The Worship of Mammon, the god of material wealth, by Evelyn De Morgan

The great part of the US population, as well as in other developed countries, is that believers have deviated from Biblical truth as well as become wedded to matter and thus actually honour the god Mammon. Several denominations in the United States make clever use of asking people for money all the time, pretending that they will then have a better life. It has also become so ingrained in people that one can only be successful if one has acquired a lot of money. Consequently, many do everything possible to be as rich as possible (on the material plane) while completely neglecting spiritual wealth. Many have forgotten that it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than it is for a rich person to enter the kingdom of God.

Stacy writes

It is hard to deny today that for many, the supposed downfall of America is synonymous with the collapse of Christianity. Jesus confronts this idolatry with his Kingdom. {The Danger of Faith}

Lots of Americans are even not aware of how they participate in idolatry, which they prove by continually clinging to pagan festivals such as Candlemas, Easter, Halloween and Christmas, to name only the main ones, and to cling to money and material gain.

He reigns over a Kingdom that cannot be shaken through the rising and falling empires of this world. {The Danger of Faith}

And throughout history, many kingships or kingdoms and principalities as well as republics have risen and fallen. Never before has man succeeded in creating a nation or empire in which everyone was comfortable and where justice was done to everyone. Several Christians, in imitation of Christ, have tried to make people understand how best to live in unity with fellow human beings, plants and animals.

Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C. (Leaders marching from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial) - NARA - 542010.tif

The 1963 March on Washington participants and leaders marching from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial, as mass protest movement against racial segregation and discrimination in the southern United States that came to national prominence during the mid-1950s.

When we look at the German culture struggle of the 1870’s (kulturkampf) it’s clear that the American Civil Rights movement was a “Culture War” too. King’s commitment to non-violence laid a distinct Christian foundation for the Civil Rights movement. But white evangelicals of the time either distanced themselves from King, or denounced the Civil Rights movement entirely, with calls to “just preach the gospel.”  {A History Of The Culture Wars}

writes Stacy.

But not many white Americans were really willing to go to preach what was really written in the gospel. They prefer just to take some phrases out of context to repeat them so that people come to believe them.

The forty odd years from this origin point until today witnessed the end of the Cold War and an insurrection at the US Capitol. Between these bookends, Culture War Christianity made itself known & felt in American society through movements. (See, Kristin Kobes Du Mez, Jesus and John Wayne; Stan Gall, Borderlines: Reflections on Sex, War, and the Church; Frances Fitzgerald, The Evangelicals; Tim Gloege, Guaranteed Pure; historical treatments on these movements) {A History Of The Culture Wars}

Stacy reminds his readers:

The arguments and relationships in the antebellum South were transported via Lost Cause theology 100 years into the future, seen in white evangelical responses to the Civil Rights Movement. But these leaders could not ignore the impact of King’s kulturkampf. {A History Of The Culture Wars}

He assures his readers that

Culture War Christianity started after the Civil Rights Movement, not before. It borrows the playbook of the CRM. Ironically, it thrives on a sort of “persecuted minority” mindset, borrowed from the Civil Rights movement, but not actually indicative of the communal experience in its main constituents: white evangelicals. A minority mindset is a prominent characteristic of God’s people in the Scriptures. However, this mindset is not characteristic of evangelical experience in the United States. Race relations and evangelical’s historic participation in the moral establishment offer two historical keys that present a necessary critique of modern Culture War Christianity. {A History Of The Culture Wars}

He believes it is impossible to understand the history behind Culture War Christianity apart from race relations in the United States. So, we begin where we left off, with this statement:

The Culture Wars began when white American evangelicals took the activist playbook from the very Civil Rights leaders they opposed, to advance a moral agenda they could support.

Some were overtly political, like the Moral Majority or Christian Coalition. Others would serve the notion of family values, yet retain political influence, like Focus on the Family or Promise Keepers. Local churches and expansive media (books, radio, television) formed the local grassroots communities made these movements possible.

While this all may seem quite familiar, especially if you inhabited spaces within white American Christianity during the last 40 years, a history of the Culture Wars would be best served by going back 2 centuries to look at the phrase “Culture War” itself. {A History Of The Culture Wars}

In his blog he then goes back to the 19th century, across the Atlantic Ocean where the Germans provide us with a glimpse into a framework upstream to both the Civil Rights Movement and “Culture War Christianity” at a time when a new world order was being born. In that era, he recognises the central position of the Catholic Church, facing new threats to its grasp on power.

From the political power of the nation- state to the intellectual frameworks of liberalism and Darwinism, the winds were shifting. In response, the Church produced a flurry of theological statements and denouncements meant to stem the tide of ideas that threatened its hold on the Old World Order. {A History Of The Culture Wars}

File:Portrait pius ix.jpg

Portrait of Pope Pius IX circa 1864

The Holy See under Pope Pius IX on 8 December 1864, brought an appendix to the Quanta cura encyclical, with a syllabus where the church wanted to have the people see that it was with the times and recognised 80 of the

“principal errors of our times.”

As the errors listed had already been condemned in allocutions, encyclicals, and other apostolic letters, the Syllabus said nothing new and so could not be contested. Its importance lay in the fact that it published to the world what had previously been preached in the main only to the bishops, and that it made general what had been previously specific denunciations concerned with particular events. Perhaps the most famous article, the 80th, stigmatising as an error the view that

“the Roman Pontiff can and should reconcile himself to and agree with progress, liberalism, and modern civilisation,”

sought its authority in the pope’s refusal, in Jamdudum Cernimus, to have any dealings with the new Italian kingdom. On both scores, the Syllabus undermined the liberal Catholics’ position, for it destroyed their following among intellectuals and placed their program out of court.

The Church denounced religious liberty, the nation-state, and other consequences stemming from the “threat of liberalism.” {A History Of The Culture Wars}

For some time there had been bumbling or difficulty in having a good relationship with the Catholic Church. More thinkers also came to speak out about the huge profits the Church was making on the backs of the faithful. Increasingly, there was also the idea of going back to the basics of Christ’s teachings where simplicity was preached and people were taught how to stand up for and care for each other. In the gospel, Jesus set a good example of how not only Christians should live, but actually every human being.

In the 1870’s, the German people, specifically within the Kingdom of Prussia, found themselves in conflict with the Catholic Church over their own Reformation roots and a rapidly secularizing order. This conflict had ramifications for both the Church and the separated German states. As a result of this conflict swirling around the German peoples, individual German States united along highly Protestant lines under Otto Von Bismark of Prussia. (See, Helmut Walser Smith, editor, The Oxford Handbook of Modern German History) This period of conflict and change was given a name: Kulturkampf, or “Culture Struggle”. This German kulturkampf shows us how struggles between competing visions for human existence are sparked by complex reactions between religion, politics, and power. {A History Of The Culture Wars}

It is the clash between people of the common people, as well as philosophers and political thinkers, with the church, that caused very animated conversations in several places in the German Empire about faith, church, and the way we as human beings should choose to arrive at a better world.

After World War II several American religious groups tried to have the power over the American people. They tried to convince them that they were the sole church which preached the truth. Some even went so far to tell the people they were chosen by God and that their church is the only one that can bring them in heaven. For those churches, it is certain that one can only be accepted by God if one follows their rules. Of course, such a saying is absurd, but a large majority of Americans follow that false statement. In the life of faith, it is also certain that no particular church by Jesus was ever designated as the only one to follow.

By studying German kulturkampf, we can begin to see the American Culture War’s false claim to exclusivity and authority by claiming itself to be the sole representative and defender of orthodox Christianity. When we realize this — that American Culture War Christianity is not the single defender of the faith —  it trains us to adopt a healthy critical filter every time a Christian leader describes the “very survival of Christianity at stake” as a smoke screen for unChristian agreements with power. On the other hand, conscientious objectors to Culture War Christianity would do well to consider how “culture struggle” might be a positive expression of Christian faith. There is space to consider positive “culture struggle”. {A History Of The Culture Wars}

King’s kulturkampf was rooted in Christian principles, and sought to dismantle the injustices of racial segregation, subjugation and discrimination within America. With the upcoming of the more conservative Christians, and/or conservative evangelicals, the position between coloured people worsened again and nationalism and (far) right-wing ideas came to the forefront in the States, the same way they did in the 1930s in Europe. Thus, from Europe, we could see the very dangerous development of right-wing rule and the glorification of such despots as Donald Trump, who is a danger to the world.

What would come to define and shape Culture War Christianity in 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s in the US is not at all what King and several serious preachers had in mind. The growing conservatism by the Americans brought forward people who are against equality and who find the white man is the pure race. Even Billy Graham came to criticise segregation but also denounced the non-violent demonstrations as contributing to further violence.

Others denounced calls for desegregation entirely. Back in 1960, Bob Jones Sr. took harder lines at Christians supporting an end to segregation by referring to them as “religious infidels”. {A History Of The Culture Wars}

Several pastors of mega-churches, especially in white neighbourhoods, succeeded in shifting all the faults of the system onto the backs of the blacks and refugees who just’ came and invaded America’, without the government doing enough to stop them. One would think the religious leaders would have their moral reasoning to flow from a theological calculus, but it (for sure) did not come from Biblical teaching.

Stacy writes

Charles Ivory’s masterful Proslavery Christianity examines the white evangelical relationship with black evangelicals before the Civil War. He looks at how these interactions between white and black Christians, slave and free, actually came to shape the white evangelical theological defense of slavery. If we want to understand the Culture War Christianity of Falwell, and other white evangelicals, we need to examine their response to the Civil Rights Movement. I believe their response has its source in the theological calculus of white evangelicals in the antebellum South. {A History Of The Culture Wars}

Ivory writes it was not uncommon for white and black evangelicals to worship within the same church. Indeed, the revival of the late 18th century did not discriminate on the basis of cultural background. But the theological conflict in evangelical churches pre-Civil War centered around conversion. Namely, does Christian conversion necessitate manumission? Today, Christians would argue chattel slavery is indefensible regardless of a slave’s conversion to Christianity. Humanity is not property. However, the historical context of the time made the question of conversion and manumission the frontline theological conflict regarding chattel slavery within evangelical churches. {A History Of The Culture Wars}

In West Europe the people had gone already through that process, knowing that slavery was something one could not accept in a civilised society. On this, several speakers came to draw attention to a system to bring more equality among all people. The road to socialism and communism was thus promoted by several enthusiasts.

Culture War Christianity has long since ossified into the de facto expression of faith for many white American evangelicals.

But those white American Christians have come to love themselves more than someone else and consider themselves as the only ones worthy to govern America. They do not have an eye at all for the indigenous people, because they consider themselves as the rightful founders and owners of America.

For 200 years, white evangelicalism has been an insider. No where has the minority mindset been more pervasive in our modern conception of Culture War Christianity than rhetoric. Phrases like “drain the swamp”, “make America great again”, and “take back America for God” in evangelical politics go right next to “that’s too political” and “just preach the gospel” in evangelical churches. {A History Of The Culture Wars}

We can wonder from who those evangelicals have to take back ‘their country’! Those evangelicals seem not to have any idea what the ‘founders’ of America had in mind and why they wanted religion and government separated.

While separation of church and state was federally enshrined in the Constitution, it did not play out in those strict terms in state and local governments. This changed in the early 20th century, when the Scopes trial, New Deal politics, and internal theological warring between fundamentalists and modernists left a vacuum in American society that evangelicalism used to fill in common culture. Neo-evangelicals like Billy Graham emerged in this vacuum. But for the long of American history, Christians have not only been influential, but privileged.

How can a privileged majority come to see itself as a minority? Culture War Christianity accomplishes this in part by dressing itself in the Biblical and theological concept of a remnant. A faithful few of God’s people who remain loyal to God and his ways in a foreign, godless land. But this theological adaptation does not line up with the historical participation of white evangelicals in the moral establishment of the United States. Yet, the drums of Culture War for white American Christians implied a greater enemy beyond its borders. {A History Of The Culture Wars}

Though the big problem of those Tea Party and conservative or fundamentalist evangelicals is that they are not at all remaining “loyal to God and his ways in a foreign, godless land” they even have betrayed God and His son on several levels. They have created some three-headed god (or three-une being) and political leaders such as Trump as their gods, and consider their American flag as their religious symbol even a Christian symbol. For sure they can not belong to the faithful few of God’s people, because they do not believe in the Only One True God and because they do not act like People of God. They themselves are part of that ‘dark world’ the Bible is talking about. And now in those times that darkness and of gloominess can be seen everywhere, they also do everything to create division and spread hate, instead of spreading the love of Christ and his great message of a world full of peace. Those evangelicals with other name Christians have made it a sport to make fun of, blacken and curse true Christians. They do everything possible to get people away from those true worshippers of God. They also have some sort of paranoia and consider all people from abroad as dangerous suspects. They fear those coming from outside America would destroy their freedom.

Stacy remarks

the drums of Culture War for white American Christians implied a greater enemy beyond its borders. {A History Of The Culture Wars}

and also see what happened under the influence of certain political figures.

The Culture Wars of white American evangelicalism was not the reaction of the minority against the majority, but the majority against a imagined majority. It is hard to avoid this conclusion given overwhelming support for President Trump. {A History Of The Culture Wars}

Stacy continues writing

In the place of Jesus’ active reign today, we find American Christians given to other reigning power structures: nationalism, racism, misogyny, and bigotry. They are discipled by political—not resurrection—power. This is partly the reason why Culture War Christians took greater issue with Kaepernick’s supposed desecration of the flag than they might with his concerns over police brutality against image bearers. They operate in a power structure other than the Kingdom of Jesus. {A Theology of Culture War Christianity}

Stacys wonders

What if Culture War Christianity long ago bowed the knee to a nationalist, secular conservatism? One with its law & order politics, reticence on issues of race, and idolatry of country? {Beyond the Culture Wars}

Ans says that he has argued this in his series.

Long before white evangelicals told MLK to “just preach the gospel”, there has always been a Christianity domesticated by, and deployed in defense of, the status quo in this country. Frederick Douglass called it before any of us. And in this sort of Christianity, “make disciples” has too often been code for “make people like us” not “make us like Jesus”. {Beyond the Culture Wars}

There lies one of the biggest problems in American Christendom. The majority of Americans does not take time enough to seriously study the Scriptures. For most of them the Bible also only means the New Testament. Lots of those evangelicals also do not understand what that sacrificial offering of Jesus, letting himself be nailed at the stake, means. For them it is very difficult to grasp how a man of flesh and blood could give himself as a lamb for whitewashing the sins of many.

Some of those white evangelicals living in the United States of America are convinced they are the only ones who can  Make America Great Again and build up the most correct state. They forget how so many people before them have tried already to construct an ideal state. They should know it shall only happen under Jesus Christ that we shall be able to live in a perfect world.

Let us also not forget Niebuhr’s saying,

“any good worth doing takes more than one lifetime.”

According to Jared Stacy

This should give us pause before we entertain pragmatism to bring about change in our lifetime. It was Jesus who said,

“what does it profit a man to gain the whole world, and lose his soul?”

This should give us pause as we count the cost of pragmatism to reveal the Kingdom of God. {Beyond the Culture Wars}

He ends his article series by saying

After all, the cross is not a symbol of cultural superiority for white America, but of surrender and sacrifice in the Kingdom of God. We must measure our motivations by the Cross, and our methods. Take it from me. A millennial. The generation who was born in and shaped by the ‘Jesus & John Wayne evangelicalism” in its prime. {Beyond the Culture Wars}

And recognises the problem

Culture War Christianity allows you to have a Christian worldview and reject the Cross.   {Beyond the Culture Wars}

By which he hopefully means: rejecting the ransom offering of that Jewish Nazarene master teacher, Jeshua ben Josef, or Jesus Christ, the Messiah.

It substitutes other, more pragmatic means to really get things done. But in the Kingdom of Jesus the only strategy available for implementing a Christian worldview is the Cross.  {Beyond the Culture Wars}

We have to do away with the false teaching in Christendom and have to go back to the Biblical teachings and keep to them, adhering to Biblical Truth and not human doctrine.

We should recognise the danger of that growing conservative evangelism.

For all it’s posturing about the morality of America, Culture War Christianity has stopped its ear to calls for ethnic & economic justice. Has tied its hands in response to sexual scandal and abuse in its ranks. Yet expresses incredulity when the world fails to take its sexual ethic seriously. Culture War Christianity can only provide more entrenchment, more combat, and more pragmatism. But crucified Christianity is growing the world over, and—as it has always done— turning the world upside down.  {Beyond the Culture Wars}

Writing from Scotland, the author of the mentioned articles, wants to suggest a simple but humble invitation to venture into the wilderness as an act of faithfulness. For him,

the wilderness meant stepping out of the American pastorate, and out of America. This was my move made in faith. An attempt to combat the rise of cynicism in my own spirit, channeling it into meaningful, faithful action.  {Beyond the Culture Wars}

From Moses, to Elijah, to Christ. Perhaps the wilderness is the place for those disenchanted and disillusioned, those disowned and disinherited from Culture War Christianity, to begin to see the Cross not as a symbol storming the US Capitol, but again as a place where our power grabs go to die. And where there is death to our ability to bring about change, God brings resurrection that changes everything.  {Beyond the Culture Wars}

The Austrian philosopher and Roman Catholic priest known for his radical polemics arguing that the benefits of many modern technologies and social arrangements were illusory and that, still further, such developments undermined humans’ self-sufficiency, freedom, and dignity, Ivan Illich illumines what it is to be in the world, but not of it — just like Jesus.

Jared Stacy offers his words as a simple reflection in the conclusion to his series:

It is astonishing what the devil says: I have all power, it has been given to me, and I am the one to hand it on — submit, and it is yours. Jesus of course does not submit…Not for a moment, however, does Jesus contradict the devil. He does not question that the devil holds all power, nor that this power has been given to him, nor that he, the devil, gives it to whom he pleases. This is a point which is easily overlooked. By his silence Jesus recognizes power that is established as “devil” and defines Himself as The Powerless. He who cannot accept this view on power cannot look at establishments through the spectacle of the Gospel. This is what clergy and churches often have difficulty doing. They are so strongly motivated by the image of church as a “helping institution” that they are constantly motivated to hold power, share in it or, at least, influence it.  {Beyond the Culture Wars}

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  20. Postalgia / Prostalgia – Is this as Good as it Gets?
  21. The Age of Surveillance Capitalism
  22. Cultural Amnesia
  23. The Future of Governance
  24. False American Dream
  25. Thinking Critically about Marxism, Socialism and Communism (All in fewer than 1000 words!)
  26. The Missing Faith Dimension of the Capitalism vs. Socialism Debate
  27. A Broken system
  28. Psychological Warfare
  29. Humanities Retribution
  30. Walk The Path
  31. Reform or Revolution? A Debate (I)
  32. Reform or Revolution? A Debate (II)
  33. Editorial: what is humane socialism?
  34. The virtues of good, enlightened, accountable elitism
  35. The Radical Left Needs to Call into Question Existing Social Institutions at Every Opportunity, Part Four
  36. End of capitalism as we know it
  37. The Future is History
  38. The true believer
  39. Research Resources: Communism in America
  40. “A Spectre is Haunting Europe…”
  41. Finding the Ideal, Perfect Community
  42. So You Think Capitalism Is Evil
  43. Capitalism: The Ultimate Empowerment
  44. Capitalism: Misunderstood
  45. On the Current Conjuncture
  46. The discipled political church
  47. Veneration (Gilbert and Gilbert)
  48. Christianity and Idealism (Van Til)
  49. Brief Insights on Mastering Bible Doctrine (Heiser)
  50. A Field Guide on False Teaching
  51. Andrew McWilliams-Doty looks at evangelicals
  52. Evangelical: Leave It or Love It?
  53. How the term Evangelical has grown to blur theology and ideology
  54. Bad Religion: How We Became a Nation of Heretics – An Interview
  55. Which Christians Actually Evangelize
  56. Is it Time to Abandon “Evangelical?”
  57. Warped Christianity
  58. The 10 Commandments in American Culture
  59. Communist Infiltration, What Did Bella Dodd REALLY Know – YouTube
  60. German priest contradicts pope and backs pornography as sexual ‘relief’ for celibates | Catholic News Agency
  61. Sports Star to Be Jailed 10 Months for ‘Transphobic’ Message
  62. What is at stake in the buffer zone debate? | Isabel Vaughan-Spruce | The Critic Magazine
  63. Win for Christian ministry after judge refuses to strike out discrimination case – Christian Concern
  64. Watch the body language in this heated exchange yesterday between Canada’s Justin Trudeau and Chinese Emperor Xi 👀 | Not the Bee
  65. Episode 21 – Stella(r) (Hypo)Creasy and the Gov Crackdown on Free Speech – YouTube
  66. Senate advances same-sex marriage bill amid religious freedom concerns – Catholic World Report
  67. America/Brazl – After 50 years, the mission of Cimi is still “to defend with courage and prophecy the cause of the indigenous peoples” – Agenzia Fides
  68. The Christian Father -Conferences of the Men’s Group – YouTube

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The missing mystery writer

In 1926, the mystery writer Agatha Christie went missing. The story of her 11-day disappearance — as strange a plot as any of her novels — is part of a new biography by Lucy Worsley.
After her husband, Archie, began an affair with a younger woman, Christie fell into a depression. While out for a drive, she crashed her car down a hill and into a hedge. The car was found, but she was not; she had fled to a spa hotel, staying there under a false identity that shared a surname with her husband’s paramour. Finally, after more than a week, two musicians recognized her as the famous missing author.
“Whatever the true circumstances of Christie’s severance with reality, the media had a field day,” Molly Young writes in a review of the biography. “Her book sales shot up.”

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Invitation to the news platform that brings a view of the world

Dear Reader,

There is so much news — and too many voices — competing for your attention today.

Do you know that we provide a site where we present news from all over the world and do not mind going deeper into certain facets of facts everyone should know or should receive attention (according to us) .

Some view on the World”  does just that what the title of the website is called. It wishes to bring a view of world affairs. It wants to be a Journal for you and provides unbiased news and perspective to keep you well-informed and entertained.

In addition to general press reviews, you will be able to find articles that deal with environmental issues and take a closer look at how we, as human beings, must take responsibility, not only ethically and politically, but how we must behave towards other living beings and respect nature. Towards respecting other beings, racial discrimination comes to the fore, but also how we in the West sometimes look strangely at other cultures. We believe that getting to know other cultures and religions better can help to better understand and accept “that otherness of those people”. In today’s society, people do not like to talk about religion, but on “Some View on the World” we certainly do not shy away from that subject, and we even think it is important to talk about God and commandments.

As on this overview site, we believe it is important to let diverse voices have their say. Therefore, at that view of the world, you can find reports from several newspapers and writers from all kinds of directions or different political movements.

Today, we would like to invite you to feast your eyes on that website too, pay it a visit and (who knows) also subscribe to it to receive free daily news in your mailbox.

A warm welcome!

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Flight operated by all-Black women crew honours Bessie Coleman

In celebration of aviation trailblazer Bessie Coleman, a recent American Airlines flight from Dallas-Fort Worth to Phoenix was staffed entirely by Black women, from the pilots to the cargo team. In the aviation industry, less than 1 percent of pilots are Black women, and that‘s why Captain Beth Powell said she was

“beyond thrilled to be part of the crew where we are inspiring young girls, young girls of color, to see the various roles that these women play in every aspect to make this flight possible.”

In 1921, Coleman became the first Black woman to earn her pilot’s license, after she learned French and traveled to Paris to attend the Caudron Brothers School of Aviation. She went on to fly in air shows, dazzling crowds with her dangerous tricks. Coleman died in a plane crash in 1926 at age 34, before she was able to fulfill her dream of opening a flight school for Black pilots. Her great-niece, Gigi Coleman, was a passenger on the American Airlines flight, and said she was “grateful” to have the opportunity to

“highlight my great-aunt’s accomplishments in the field of aviation.”

25 Aug 2022

[CNN]

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The First American

Webner House

I live in Franklin County, Ohio, where the large statue of Benjamin Franklin pictured below is found at the county courthouse, so it makes sense that at some point I would finally turn to reading a biography of the county’s namesake.  I chose The First American, a fine recent biography by H.W. Brands that is well worth reading if you are interested in learning more about the early history of America and one of its foremost founding fathers.

Franklin is a fascinating character for more reasons that you can reasonably count.  During his lifetime, he was easily the most famous American alive, known and lauded in both America and in Europe for his experiments with lightning and electricity, his invention of the Franklin stove and other devices, and his writings, both in Poor Richard’s Almanac and elsewhere.  He was a hard-working capitalist, turning his printers’ shop into a thriving…

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Elizabeths and Charles I-III

England had a Queen Elizabeth queen of England and Ireland, born on Sunday the 7th of September 1533, and, like all the Tudors except Henry VII, at Greenwich Palace, was the only surviving child of Henry VIII by his second queen, Anne Boleyn. With such a mother and with Cranmer as her godfather she represented from her birth the principle of revolt from Rome, but the opponents of that movement attached little importance to her advent into the world. She got the bynames the Virgin Queen and Good Queen Bess,

Although her small kingdom was threatened by grave internal divisions, Elizabeth’s blend of shrewdness, courage, and majestic self-display inspired ardent expressions of loyalty and helped unify the nation against foreign enemies.

Then there was Elizabeth Stuart (1596–1662), consort of Frederick V., elector palatine and titular king of Bohemia, who was the eldest daughter of James I. of Great Britain and of Anne of Denmark, and was born at Falkland Castle in Fifeshire in August 1596. Her brother, the second surviving son of James VI of Scotland and Anne of Denmark was Charles I king of Great Britain and Ireland. In 1620 he took up warmly the cause of his sister the queen of Bohemia, and in 1621 he defended Bacon, using his influence to prevent the chancellor’s degradation from the peerage.

On the 27th of March 1625 Charles I. succeeded to the throne by the death of his father, and on the 1st of May he was married by proxy to Henrietta Maria.

Next we have the Elizabeth who was the UK’s longest-serving monarch and died at Balmoral aged 96, after reigning for 70 years, on Thursday 8, 2022.
The Protestant feelings of the Commons were also aroused by the king’s support of the royal chaplain, Richard Montagu, who had repudiated Calvinistic doctrine. He was a king who managed to rule without parliaments for eleven years, with some success.

He supported zealously William Laud’s rigid Anglican orthodoxy, his compulsory introduction of unwelcome ritual, and his narrow, intolerant and despotic policy, which was marked by several savage prosecutions and sentences in the Star Chamber, drove numbers of moderate Protestants out of the Church into Presbyterianism, and created an intense feeling of hostility to the government throughout the country. Charles I further increased the popular fears on the subject of religion by his welcome given to Panzani, the pope’s agent, in 1634, who endeavoured unsuccessfully to reconcile the two churches, and afterwards to George Conn, papal agent at the court of Henrietta Maria, while the favour shown by the king to these was contrasted with the severe sentences passed upon the Puritans.

He had his war against the Scots and the civil war between Royalists and Parliamentarians.  And after a series of Toyalist defeats Charles surrendered to the Scots in May 1646. The Parliamentarians convicted him of treason and got him beheaded.

11 years after his father Charles I was executed Charles II of Great Britain reigned from 1660-85, after the political turmoil had ended.
No event in the history of England had been attended with more lively and general rejoicing than Charles’s restoration, and none was destined to cause greater subsequent disappointment and disillusion. Indolent, sensual and dissipated by nature, Charles’s vices had greatly increased during his exile abroad, and were now, with the great turn of fortune which gave him full opportunity to indulge them, to surpass all the bounds of decency and control. A long residence till the age of thirty abroad, together with his French blood, had made him politically more of a foreigner than an Englishman, and he returned to England ignorant of the English constitution, a Roman Catholic and a secret adversary of the national religion, and untouched by the sentiment of England’s greatness or of patriotism.

The first period of Charles II.’s reign (1660–1667) was that of the administration of Lord Clarendon, the principal author of the Restoration settlement.

In February 1665 the ill-omened war with Holland was declared, during the progress of which it became apparent how greatly the condition of the national services and the state of administration had deteriorated since the Commonwealth, and to what extent England was isolated and abandoned abroad,

The Dutch War, declared on the 17th of March 1672, though the commercial and naval jealousies of Holland had certainly not disappeared in England, was unpopular because of the alliance with France and the attack upon Protestantism, while the king’s second declaration of indulgence (15th of March 1672) aroused still further antagonism, was declared illegal by the parliament, and was followed up by the Test Act, which obliged James and Clifford to resign their offices. In February 1674 the war with Holland was closed by the treaty of London or of Westminster, though Charles still gave Louis a free hand in his aggressive policy towards the Netherlands, and the Cabal was driven from office. The “Popish Plot,” the creation of a band of impostors encouraged by Shaftesbury and the most violent and unscrupulous of the extreme Protestant party in order to exclude James from the throne, had thrown the whole country into a panic.

In his resistance to the great movement for the exclusion of James from the succession, Charles was aided by moderate men such as Halifax, who desired only a restriction of James’s powers, and still more by the violence of the extreme exclusionists themselves, who headed by Shaftesbury brought about their own downfall and that of their cause by their support of the legitimacy and claims of Charles’s natural son, the duke of Monmouth.

The reign of his predecessor Charles I., and even of that of his successor James II., with their mistaken principles and ideals, have a saving dignity wholly wanting in that of Charles II., and the administration of Cromwell, in spite of the popularity of the restoration, was soon regretted.

“A lazy Prince,”

writes Pepys,

“no Council, no money, no reputation at home or abroad. It is strange how . . . everybody do nowadays reflect upon Oliver and commend him, what brave things he did and made all the neighbour princes fear him; while here a prince, come in with all the love and prayers and good liking of his people . . . hath lost all so soon. . . .

Charles II had no children by his queen, but his numerous mistresses gave him a large illegitimate progeny.

As the wife of King George VI, Elizabeth Angela Marguerite Bowes-Lyon (4 August 1900 – 30 March 2002) was Queen of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth from 11 December 1936 to 6 February 1952. As queen consort, Elizabeth also enjoyed great popularity, enhanced in part by her actions during World War II, when she refused to leave London during German air raids, even after Buckingham Palace was bombed. Many credit her with setting the tone for the modern British monarchy, as she eased formalities and established an unprecedented rapport with the public. She sympathetically was also called the “Queen Mum” and was credited with sustaining the monarchy through numerous crises, including the abdication of Edward VIII and the death of Princess Diana.

On April 21, 1926 Elizabeth Alexandra Mary, the future queen Elizabeth II was born.

Queen Elizabeth II, queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and of her other realms and territories, head of the Commonwealth of Nations, succeeded her father King George VI on February 6 1952 and witnessed enormous social change.

Like other British sovereigns since Edward VII (reigned 1901-10), she assumed an almost entirely symbolic leadership of the British people. From 1951 she had already begun to represent King George VI, whose health was failing, on various occasions.

To the unveiling of a memorial to Queen Mary (consort of King George V) on June 7, 1967, she invited the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, in an attempt to reunite the royal family for the first time since the former King’s abdication in 1936.

We could see how, here and there, she tried to offer the glue to resolve conflicts and fractures.  But her attitude was not always well understood, especially when it came to the domestic problems between her children, with Princess Diana in particular.

It was Lady Diana Frances Spencer daughter of Viscount Althorp (later Earl Spencer), who gave her husband prince Charles two sons, Prince William (1982) who would become next in line after prince Charles, and prince Harry (1984) who is the fifth in the line of succession to the British throne.

The “marriage of the century” was not to last, and Charles and Diana separated in 1992 to be divorced in 1996. She remained highly visible and continued her activities on behalf of numerous charities. A great problem was that the paparazzi could not leave her alone. In 1997 in a chase by sensation reporters, she was killed in a car crash in Paris, along with her companion, Emad Mohamed (Dodi) al-Fayed (1955–97), and their driver. Her death brought on a massive public outpouring of grief.

The car crash seemed for a moment also to create a crash in the monarchy, people not understanding how it could be that a mother and grandmother could stay so apathetic and why it took so much time before the queen appeared to say something good about the beloved princess.

Aberfan disaster, October 1966.jpg

Aberfan in the days immediately after the disaster, showing the extent of the spoil slip

Also in 1966, it was not understood by a lot of Britons why it had taken 8 days before the queen turned up at Aberfan, Wales, where a horrifying coal waste avalanche had killed 144 people, the bulk of them youngsters. The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh visited Aberfan on 29 October to pay their respects to those who had died. Their visit coincided with the end of the main rescue phase; only one contracting firm remained in the village to continue the last stages of the clear-up.

At the place of the tragic event people could see tears running down the queen’s cheeks when she spoke with the survivors. (This expedition to Aberfan was also included in the web series ‘The Crown’.)

In 1992 the public may not have witnessed her tears, but for Queen Elizabeth that was an annus horribilis.
Strangely enough, that terrible year seemed to have loosened something in her that made her appear softer and more ‘root mother-like’ as the years went by. From then onwards it seems that the popularity of the monarchy, which had nearly reached the bottom of the sea, could rise again.

The celebrations of her Silver, Golden, Diamond, and Platinum Jubilees in 1977, 2002, 2012, and 2022, respectively became remarkable occasions where the British people showed how they wanted to show their connection and love for the royals. Up to Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, the Cayman Islands and Gibraltar, as well as in other Commonwealth member-states, like the Gambia, Malaysia, Malta, Pakistan, and Samoa organised also celebrations and showed the four-day Platinum Jubilee Central Weekend from Thursday, 2 June, to Sunday, 5 June, their union with the United Kingdom.

Commemorative stamps and coins were issued by several Commonwealth nations and beacons were lit in every Commonwealth capital for the first time. In many places, trees were planted in the Queen’s honour.

One cannot think of a finer ending than the one offered to this elderly lady who has earned her feathers through thick and thin.

Tributes and messages of congratulations came from leaders all over the world.

Following the platinum jubilee weekend, the Queen released a thank you message in which she said:

When it comes to how to mark seventy years as your Queen, there is no guidebook to follow. It really is a first. But I have been humbled and deeply touched that so many people have taken to the streets to celebrate my platinum jubilee. While I may not have attended every event in person, my heart has been with you all; and I remain committed to serving you to the best of my ability, supported by my family.

At a young age she had already told the public she was willing to serve her country in good and in bad days, as long as she would live; And she did!

On the 8th of September the light went out for her and her oldest son at her bedside took over the role she wanted him and his wife to take.

King Charles III, 73, said the death of his beloved mother was a “moment of great sadness” for him and his family and that her loss would be “deeply felt” around the world.

He also took the chance to both honour “Her Majesty”, “his mommy”. He said

“We mourn profoundly the passing of a cherished sovereign and a much-loved mother.

“I know her loss will be deeply felt throughout the country, the realms and the Commonwealth, and by countless people around the world.”

Now entered a new era, but ,first there would be the coming period of mourning, were he and his family would be

“comforted and sustained by our knowledge of the respect and deep affection in which the Queen was so widely held”.

All the Queen’s children had travelled to Balmoral, near Aberdeen, after doctors placed the Queen under medical supervision. There her grandson and now heir to the throne, Prince William, and his brother, Prince Harry, also gathered. The new king also expressed his love for both Prince Harry and his wife Meghan Markle.

Concerning his mother King Charles he believes she has undertaken now another journey:

“To my darling mama, as you begin your last great journey to join my dear lady. I want simply to say this: ‘Thank you,’”

he said to close his address.

“Your love and devotion to our family and to the family of nations you have served so diligently all these years. May flights of angels sing thee to thy rest.”

 

She may rest in peace!

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Find also to read:

  1. A lifelong passion for horses and a Queen’s Platinum Jubilee
  2. A resolute woman who served her country for a very long time
  3. The longest-lived and longest-reigning British monarch is not any-more
  4. Pump, circumstance, Royalism and paganism
  5. Royals, mini busses and environment
  6. 2014 Social contacts
  7. A busy 2017 #3 Fake, gossip and real news
  8. 2019 was #4 a Year of much deceit in Belgium and the rest of Europe
  9. BBC One on Sunday May 29: Never-before-seen footage of Queen Elizabeth II
  10. The week of February the 16th 2022 by The Telegraph
  11. Indy 100 briefing of May 18, 2022: Seeing is believing 
  12. The Telegraph’s Weekly view 2022 June 04 – June 10
  13. The Independent looking at May 26 – June 01
  14. Indy big Stories for 1 Jun 2022
  15. Global Headlines looked at the beginning of June 2022 by Bloomberg
  16. The Independent looking at June 02 – June 08
  17. Blood soaking the water at democracy’s beachhead
  18. The Guardian Headlines for 2022 July 11 -July 17
  19. British MPs did not turn their back on the Prime Minister

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Is the Russian military superior to any other European nation?

Icon for on Diplomacy & Warfare

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What’s a historical fact that would shock most people to find out?: Rape of Nanking

The horrific events are known as the Nanking Massacre or the Rape of Nanking, as estimated that 20,000 women including some children and the elder were raped during the occupation.

A large number of rapes were done systematically by the Japanese soldiers as they went from door to door searching for girls and many women being captured and gang raped.The women were often killed immediately after being raped.

The Japanese were infuriated by the strength of Chinese resistance and when China’s Nationalist capital Nanking fell in December 1937, Japanese troops immediately slaughtered thousands of Chinese soldiers who had surrendered to them. The Japanese then rounded up about twenty thousand young Chinese men and transported them in trucks outside the city walls where they were killed in a massive slaughter. Japanese troops were then encouraged by their officers to loot Nanking and slaughter and rape the Chinese population of the city.

For six weeks, life for the Chinese in Nanking became a nightmare. Bands of drunken Japanese soldiers roamed the city, murdering, raping, looting, and burning at whim. Chinese civilians who were stopped on the street and found to possess nothing of value were immediately killed.During this period, soldiers of the Imperial Japanese Army murdered Chinese civilians and disarmed combatants who numbered an estimated 40,000 to over 300,000.

The bodies of thousands of victims of the slaughter were dumped into the Yangtze River until the river was red with their blood. After looting Nanking of anything of value the Japanese started fires that gutted one third of the city.

Subal Das

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In March of 1945 the Japanese Army did the same thing at Manila in the Philippines. It is estimated that at least 100,000 civilians were murdered.

Japanese General Yamishita was tried and executed for these war crimes. Gang rapes were also wide spread.

These victims were murdered in the Manila Hospital.

Darrell Stanley

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The World standing on three things – according to Simeon the Just

The Jewish High Priest during the Second Temple period, Simeon the Just also termed “the Righteous” because of the piety of his life and his benevolence toward his compatriots, was deeply interested in the spiritual and material development of the nation.

As a high priest of the Great Synagogue he used to say:

“The world exists through three things: the Law, Service (Temple sacrifice, and today prayer), and acts of loving kindness.”

We live in this world and do have to live with it. To guide us through life in this world, the divine Creator has given us His Word and His Law, or Torah.

Torah signifies divine revelation; either the fact of communion between God and man, or the wisdom so imparted. Though to Israel alone the Torah was given, yet Israel in this was representative of humanity. Intercourse between God and man is fundamental, and without it human life above the merely animal stage would be impossible.

The service; this is the service in the temple, regarded as the worship of God in the manner appointed by him. If one special element in the service be intended, that may be the sacrifices, as a symbol of obedience to the divine commands, or the priesthood as the appointed agency for performing the service.

Maimonides interprets the word in the former sense, and this lends itself better to generalisation. ‘Deeds of kindness’, denote unselfish beneficence in the fullest measure, to cover any good that one person can do to another.

The ‘three things’ which are declared to be fundamental in human life are thus found to be Revelation, obedience to God, and brotherly love. It is possible however that the second term ‘the service’ was intended to symbolise worship as a fundamental in human life, including in its meaning both obedience to divine precepts, and the functions of consecrated ministers. The saying is only true when thus generalised; but it would be hard to say how much of that more general meaning was present to the mind of Simeon when he uttered it.

~ Pirke Aboth, Sayings of the Fathers, 1:2 (Herford)

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It’s the Little Things that Matter

by: Alex Cervantes

It is so important to make time in our lives to feed our faith. Alex advocates how faith grows when it is exercised, when it is stretched and challenged. Much like how we grow physically and mentally through day-to-day work, our faith grows the same way. Whether it’s through reading our Bible and prayer, or how we interact with people we meet each day, our faith can grow by doing the little things.

 

Listen to Alex’s Faith Talk, and many more!
LISTEN NOW

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Preceding

Why are you afraid?

You don’t have to walk through the fire

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Find also to read

  1. Fear of failure, and fear of the unknown
  2. Faith antithesis of rationality
  3. Faith Launch 2020
  4. Looking for something or for the Truth and what it might be and self-awareness
  5. Are you religious, spiritual, or do you belong to a religion, having a faith or interfaith
  6. The longer you wait
  7. Gaining deeper understanding
  8. Faith because of the questions
  9. Have faith in your faith…doubt your doubts
  10. A heart in the right place and brightly burning faith
  11. Improving the world by improving the Faith
  12. Coming of Age in Christ
  13. The chosen ones to fear or not to fear
  14. Faith, storms and actions to be taken
  15. Many forgot how Christ should be our anchor and our focus
  16. Through faith in Jesus Christ for all those who believe
  17. Background of Faith
  18. Ability (part 2)
  19. When having taken a new direction in life, having become a Christian
  20. Summer time to spend some more time at the growing process of your faith
  21. United people under Christ

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Hannah Arendt and the Banality of Evil : What can we learn?

The Curious Mag

As published on Happinez Magazine -The Morning newspaper, Sri Lanka – 8th May 2022. Link to article here

What if what we consider to be “evil” is something that is quite ordinary? The phrase “banality of evil” was coined by the German-Jewish philosopher Hannah Arendt. She received a lot of backlash for it, so much so that it ended up with her excommunication from the Jewish community. Who was Hannah Arendt, and what was this theory all about?

Hannah Arendt

Hannah Arendt (1906-1975) was a holocaust survivor who has authored many works ranging from politics to the nature of power and evil in society. The theory of the Banality of Evil came about after she attended the Eichmann trials in Israel post World War II. She attempted to explain that ordinary people can end up being actors in totalitarian systems – i.e., a dictatorial government – which doesn’t make them…

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Trivia: Native American Right to Vote

Gifford MacShane, Author

#trivia #NativeAmerican #boardingschool #votingrights

The U. S. Department of the Interior just released a study of the almost 500 “Indian Boarding Schools” that operated from 1819 to 1969, including the Carlisle Indian Industry School here in Hershey, Pennsylvania. Over 7,000 children attended this school; its most famous student was Jim Thorpe, a member of the Sac and Fox Nation, who won two gold medals in the 1912 Olympic games.

Most of the reporters I’ve heard have also mentioned how long it took for Native Americans to be able to vote. Most of them have also given their readers/viewers incomplete information.

So I’ve got atrivia question for you:

Who was President of the United States when all Native Americans were allowed to vote?

A.) Dwight D. Eisenhower

B.) Theodore Roosevelt

C.) Richard M. Nixon

D.) Calvin Coolidge

No peeking nowjust give it your best shot! C’mon, you…

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On this day in history: Burning of Holy Scriptures

On April 16, 2017 the radical Orthodox Jewish rabbi Shneur Odze burned a copy of the New Testament

On June 16, 1242, two dozen carloads of Jewish Talmud were burned in Paris

From 2017 April 17

UK: Rabbi burns New Testament as Passover ritual

On April 16, UK’s Jewish-owned online newspaper Daily Mail reported that Rabbi Shneur Odze burned a copy of the New Testament (Christian Bible canonized by Roman Emperor Constantine in 325 CE) in public as his Chametz (burning of useless or left-over food). He then posted images of it on social media on Good Friday.

Shneur Odze is a candidate for the mayor of British city of Manchester which has second largest Jewish community in the country after London. He is contesting the election as member of pro-Israel, anti-Muslim White Supremacist UK Independence Party (UKIP). Earlier this year, UKIP’s former leader Nigel Paul Farage (2006-2016) supported Donald Trump’s visa ban against seven Muslim-majority nations – claiming that there are several Muslim countries which have banned Israeli Jew tourists.

Shneur Odze claims that he found the Hebrew language copy of the New Testament in his synagogue left by some proselytizing Christian missionary.

Rabbi took it out into the street and set it alight, according to the report. He then posted photos of the book burning and wrote on Twitter:

Was wondering what I’d burn my Chametz with.”

Rabbi told reporters that he felt he had no choice but to burn the book because he did not want to pass on what he believes is false religion to someone else and said that throwing a religious text in the garbage was distasteful, especially because it also contains the Five Books of Moses (Torah).

No religious or political Jewish group condemned or apologized for Rabbi Shneur Odze’s anti-Christian act nor Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby dared to ask Manchester police to arrest the rabbi for insulting Church of England.

UK’s press called the Bible burning an act of a lone radical Orthodox Jew for whose action the world Jewry don’t need to apologize.

I bet my Canadian Looney if the religious fanatic had been a Muslim – every Jewish-owned newspaper and all British lawmakers would had demanded an apology from UK’s Muslim leaders and condemnation of the jihadi.

Christians, Jews and Hindus have a long history of burning religious scriptures of other faiths, especially Holy Qur’an. In Islam such action is considered blasphemy, a sin and serious crime.

On June 16, 1242, two dozen carloads of Jewish Talmud were burned in Paris on the orders of Pope Gregory IX and King Louis IX of France (here).

Christian Crusaders burned tens of thousands of copies of Holy Qur’an in Jerusalem (1099) and during the Spanish Inquisition (1492).

In December 2015, a Danish Jew, 42, was charged over burning a copy of Holy Qur’an and posting the image on his Facebook page with message:

Yes to freedom – no to Islam. Consider your neighbor: it stinks when it burns.

On May 20, 2008, the Associated Press reported that Jewish students in Israeli town of Or Yehuda burned several hundreds copies of New Testament in Hebrew.

Talmud commands Jews to destroy Christian religious books which is fully practiced in the only democracy in the Middle East.

In order to hide Talmud’s hateful teachings towards non-Jewish people and especially Christians – Rabbis have resisted its translation into languages other than Hebrew. In 2012, when Talmud was published in Arabic language for the first time – several pro-Israel Jewish groups lead by Abraham Foxman urged Jordanian government to take action to ensure that the Arabic translation of Jewish Talmud shouldn’t become a source of hatred of Jews and Israel among the Arabs.

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The Vikings Really Got Around, Spread Their Seeds Far and Wide

Teaching History's Slender Threads, Including 'What Ifs', Almosts, Alternatives and Turning Points

The period from the 750s to the 1100s is generally known as the Viking era in Scandinavian history. If you have Scandinavian in your DNA, it is probably from this period when the Vikings were exploring, conquering and mating with the maidens of Northern Europe. The Vikings originated in Denmark, spread into what is now Sweden, Finland, Norway, Iceland, Greenland, Northern Scotland and the Hebrides islands, Northern Ireland, Northern Europe, particularly Normandy (now France), over to Kiev, along the Dneiper River in what is now Ukraine, founding the Rus, and even way over to North America — what is now part of Canada, Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, the Gulf of Saint Lawrence and New Brunswick. In short, the Vikings really got around, spread their seeds far and wide. They were also great traders, and looking for a higher standard of living.

They were part of the Age of Exploration…

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How Did Scandinavia Become Christian?What If It United?

Teaching History's Slender Threads, Including 'What Ifs', Almosts, Alternatives and Turning Points

The Infographics Show: “What exactly is Scandinavia? The countries of Scandinavia are Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. We might also refer to the Scandinavian Peninsula, or Fennoscandia, which also comprises Finland and parts of Russia. Moreover, we talk about Nordic countries, and these include Iceland, Greenland and Faroe Islands. But today we are talking about three countries alone, and they are Sweden, Denmark and Norway. The countries have similar customs and cultures, and the languages are not far apart. The EU tells us the citizens of all these countries will likely be able to read each other’s language, although Swedes and Norwegians can have trouble understanding spoken Danish, even though the Danish and Norwegian languages are the most similar. Now, let’s look at what would happen if those countries finally came together, in this episode of the Infographics Show, What if Scandinavia United?

For those of us of at least…

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Why Does Denmark Own Greenland?

Teaching History's Slender Threads, Including 'What Ifs', Almosts, Alternatives and Turning Points

History Matters: “Greenland is massive. Denmark is not. Given its size, it’s strategic position and its distance from Denmark? How does Denmark own it and why didn’t anybody take it from them? If you want to find out watch this short and simple animated history documentary.”

The comments section is also informative:

  1. “Britain shelled Copenhagen, finally teaching the Danes how it feels to have a bunch of angry ships turn up at your shore and set things on fire” God I love this channel.
  2. “America in 19th century: ‘Can we buy Greenland?’ Denmark ‘No’. America in 1905 “Can we buy Greenland?” Denmark “No” America in 1945 “Can we buy Greenland?” Denmark “NO.” America in 2019 “Can we buy Greenland?” Denmark “NOOOOOO!!!!!!!!”
  3. “Napoleon is in every European story.”
  4. 1:18 this is incorrect. The shelling of Copenhagen happened before Denmark joined Napoleon. Denmark was neutral, but the king of the…

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The invasion of Ukraine is personal for me…as it is for many of us

Just Bear With Me...

We are all gripped – feeling both horror at Russian president Vladimir Putin and immense pride in the strength of the Ukrainians – by the ongoing invasion of Ukraine.

Readers of this website are likely aware of my personal connections to the sovereign democratic nation of Ukraine. My mother’s father – the man who became Samuel Joseph Kohn – was born in the central town of Shpola in 1904. This is during the period when the eastern edge of the Russian Empire was a vast Jewish region called The Pale of Settlement.

And while my mother’s mother – born Ida Gurmankin, though she later became Irene Goldman – was born in Philadelphia in 1914, Ida’s mother Rachel Debra Shore was born in Uman in 1895. Her first husband, my maternal great-grandfather Jacob “Jack” Gurmankin, was born in Kherson in 1893. This photograph was taken at the wedding of Jack…

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Thought by Presidents’ Day 2022

The third Monday in February, is sometimes understood as a celebration of the birthdays and lives of all U.S. presidents.
The origin of Presidents’ Day lies in the 1880s, when the birthday of Washington — commander of the Continental Army during the American Revolution and the first president of the United States — was first celebrated as a federal holiday.

On February 22 [February 11, Old Style] George Washington, also called ‘Father of His Country’, was born, and the Americans took that birthday to commemorate all their presidents.
Over the years, that birthday may have been watered down to just another day on the birthday calendar that passes like any other.

This year

What the whole world came to see on 6 January last year was a huge shock that filled people with disbelief that such a thing could happen in a civilised country. Things were so hectic at the Capitol that the nation’s founders could have turned in their graves. However, that event should not really be a surprise, because the 45th president of America had been inciting his people towards that day, proclaiming all kinds of lies as truth, and the gullible people listened to his words as holy.

writes

It’s jarring and oft-forgotten, but that belief — that all men are created equal — means each American has

by nature and the Constitution, as much of the common sovereignty as another.”

This is as true for presidents as it is for you and me. Although our presidents are endowed with an honorary title that befits the office and are entitled to a special measure of dignity and respect, the trappings of office are temporary. Eventually, presidents return among us, like Cincinnatus before them, bearing only — as George W. Bush powerfully reminded us — the title of citizen. But that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t celebrate them. {Give Thanks This Presidents’ Day}

Many Americans, like the article writer, are convinced that they are being offered the president by God.

“… in the providence of God, presidents occupy an office akin to priests and parents, albeit different in degree (Rom. 13:1). Which means that this Presidents’ Day, we should thank God for them. {Give Thanks This Presidents’ Day}

According to Mr. Walker

each president, merely by virtue of having assumed office, deserves a special measure of dignity and respect— regardless of his accomplishments, or lack thereof, during his term in office. {Give Thanks This Presidents’ Day}

File:Let's Make America Great Again button.jpegHe seems to forget what damage Donald Trump has done to his nation. Instead of making it great again (MAGA) he destroyed a lot of what Barack Obama had created, and made sure that there came more division than ever before after World War II.

Make America Great Again” or MAGA is a campaign slogan used in American politics popularized by Donald Trump in his successful 2016 presidential campaign.
Ronald Reagan used the similar slogan “Let’s Make America Great Again” in his successful 1980 presidential campaign. Bill Clinton also used the phrase in speeches during his successful 1992 presidential campaign and used it again in a radio commercial aired for his wife Hillary Clinton‘s unsuccessful 2008 presidential primary campaign. {Make America Great Again – Wikipedia}

So the call to make America a great nation again was nothing new. But Trump has played more ‘Little League Neighbour’ before and during his presidency.

Douglas Schoen has called Trump’s use of the phrase

“probably the most resonant campaign slogan in recent history”,

citing majorities of Americans who believed that the country was in decline. {Make America Great Again – Wikipedia}

Deputy general counsel to Oklahoma Governor J. Kevin Stitt, Mr. Walker worships at King’s Cross Church in Oklahoma City, asks us to take time to reflect and remember the presidents of the U.S.A.. But he reminds us, or wants us to believe that

… it is God who, according to the counsel of his will, is orchestrating all things such that the arc of history in this land — and, indeed, the world — continues to bend toward ultimate justice and peace (Ps. 89:14; Isa. 11:6).  {Give Thanks This Presidents’ Day}

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Read more about it in:

  1. Give Thanks This Presidents’ Day
  2. Facts: Why they matter and how to check them
  3. The death knell of an Empire
  4. Stress-test for democracy #1 Storming of the Capitol in Washington
  5. Stress-test for democracy #2 A coup d’etat with bloodshed
  6. Beyond the Culture Wars
  7. 2021 in review #1 the most startling point
  8. Looking at 2021 in a nutshell
  9. The Moral Character of Public Officials: Remembering January 6
  10. One year ago a sacred place was attacked
  11. January 6: A Failed Apocalypse
  12. Donald Trump requesting to block investigations about the insurrection
  13. Hope For, But Not In, Evangelicalism

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Related

  1. Presidents Day
  2. Youngest and oldest presidents in US history
  3. Lost Dog of the American Revolution: General Howe & George Washington
  4. Still Quiet
  5. President’s day – Somewhere between then and now it became politically incorrect to use the Bible as a reference point by presidents of our country.
  6. Sweet Victories and Presidents’ Day
  7. Happy Presidents Day!
  8. GOP wishes happy Presidents Day to past presidents except Biden
  9. Presidents’ Day
  10. There’s No U.S. Without US
  11. Days Off and Days On
  12. The least they could do…
  13. Tight And Ready
  14. President’s Day
  15. The Federal Holiday Is Still Washington’s Birthday, So Why Do Some Call It Presidents’ Day?
  16. Minnesota Family Turns Child’s Old Room Into ‘Presidential Suite’
  17. “White House Chair”: Buchanan Glee Club
  18. Working at Home for the Holiday
  19. Watch: Trump Gets Amazing President’s Day Surprise He’ll Not Soon Forget

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The strategic error Putin is potentially about to make

British defence minister Ben Wallace, speaking to Sky News, warned Russia President Vladimir Putin that Moscow’s aggressive military actions in 2014 resulted in “more troops on your borders, more defence spending throughout NATO.

“That is the strategic error Putin is potentially about to make,”

he added.

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Google Scholar: Actualization and interpretation in the Old Testament. Meaning, the rabid racism of messiah theology and its total negation of all heresy otherwise.

Conflict Resolution

GROVES, JOSEPH WHITE.Yale University. ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 1979. 7926245.

[[[“””Wilhelm Vischer and Hans Hellbart do not merely separate the historical and the theological, but virtually eliminate the role of historical investigation by advocating Christological exegesis. In essence their approach is a return to a pre-critical Reformation theology which views the Old and New Testaments as a unified structure. The element which creates this unity is the pervading presence of the Messiah. The New Testament interprets the Old as Messianic prophecy and this interpretation is confirmed by a study of the Old Testament as a whole. Indeed, the true nature of the Old Testament is apparently only when one recognizes the pre-existence of Christ as the head of the Old Testament church. Consequently, both the unity of the Bible and the cause of that unity are beyond the scope of historical investigation, which can only end in confusion and uncertainty…

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