Category Archives: World affairs

Climate justice & Rich people who do not want to share

2022 came to show once again what a huge gap there is between people who have next to nothing and people swimming in money. The latter have seen their wealth grow exceptionally this year as their energy shares soared.

This year, we could see how warfare brought a lot of damage to people and nature. Our earth also had a lot to endure because man did not do much to stop global warming.

Climate justice is about creating a better future for all of us. It’s about giving everyone the ability to live a life of dignity, joy and safety. This better world is possible, but only if we all fight for it.

We have to recognise that there is a very small percentage of extremely rich people whose interests side with and profit from our collective destruction. The fossil fuel execs, the billionaires, the Rishi Sunaks only make up an absolutely tiny percentage of the population. We cannot let them dictate whether we live or die. We cannot let them force millions of us in the UK and billions of us all over the world into struggle, multiple crises and instability just so they can continue to be outrageously rich as a result of the work being done by the many. We outnumber them.

We have to fight back and demand more. We have to support unions striking for better conditions for all of us.
The fight against the cost of living crisis and the climate crisis has to be connected. We have a whole world to win if we come together rather than letting those who don’t have our interests at heart divide us.


Enough is Enough is a campaign to fight the cost of living crisis.

We were founded by trade unions and community organisations determined to push back against the misery forced on millions by rising bills, low wages, food poverty, shoddy housing – and a society run only for a wealthy elite.

We can’t rely on the establishment to solve our problems. It’s up to us in every workplace and every community.

 

Green duotone photograph of General Secretary of the National Union of Rail, Maritime and Transport Workers (RMT) Mick Lynch. With the text: Mick Lynch says Enough is Enough! It's no good just being pissed off. You've got to say, I'm going to turn that into an organisation with a set of demands and a way to fight for them.

You can join the Enough Is Enough campaign here

You can find mutual aid groups to support here

A guide to finding a climate group here

A guide on why we need unions is here 

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Filed under Activism and Peace Work, Ecological affairs, Economical affairs, Lifestyle, Nature, Social affairs, Welfare matters, World affairs

Culture War Christianity in American history

In this article, you might find our comments on our previously published articles about Culture War Christians

What Are The Culture Wars?

A History Of The Culture Wars

A Theology of Culture War Christianity

Beyond the Culture Wars


 

What are the Culture Wars?

Think of “culture” as a way of life. It is the sum total of all values, beliefs, and practices making up a communal existence. When God commissions newly formed humanity in Genesis 1 to “fill the earth and subdue it”, he sets men and women into the world with a cultural mandate. His plan was for a human society, united under his rule in the world, ruling with him over the Cosmos as his vice-regents. {What Are The Culture Wars?}

Karl Marx saw how main religion tried to lure people in the ban of the church by false doctrines. It is because the majority of people did not take the time to read the Bible that so many religious groups were able to get people following their false doctrines.

Regularly, people were so prayed for by those doctrines of those churches that they no longer faced the real thing because they preferred to float on those ideas of those churches. It had become so bad that Marx also realised that for many, religion was like an ‘opium for the people’. In lots of Christian and Islamic denominations, their church leaders managed to have their followers, following and worshipping a wrong god and not following the real Christ. since his time still not much has been changed, and there are still lots of false teachers and false prophets around. Marx was disturbed by the knowledge that he saw so many people around him falling for those false human teachings and giving their money away to those churches when there were so many people around them suffering. Marx also noted few dared to question, let alone challenge, church doctrines.

It also bothered several thinkers in the 19th century that the church made no attempt to defend the majority of their churchgoers or parishioners, and did not stand up against the exploitation of parishioners. For far too many centuries, the Roman Catholic Church itself had done everything possible to trot out money from the poorer population.

The German revolutionary, sociologist, historian, and economist, Karl Marx and his closest collaborator, the German socialist philosopher Friedrich Engels’ answer to the ills of society was according to some, just the opposite of the utopian dreamers’ answers. Mainly this, because the ideas of utopists (like Mr. Ampe) seem for many too far-fetched and unreachable. Though Marx and Engels found enough people who, like them, believed that one could change the way people lived and could come to a better world with less inequality. They, too, went for a better world.

Since World War I the world has evolved incredibly on all levels. Politically it was a time of trying out several political systems, getting more than once in a lot of problems and crises. The Western world clinched at the industrialisation and experienced mixed economies floating between all kinds of political thoughts. Even as the western world became less religious and the church got less of a grip on its citizens, the rich continued to control everything and did everything they could to maintain their power.

For

For him it is clear that Christ should be at the centre of Christianity. But he also expects something for those who call themselves Christian. He

When Jesus prayed,

“on earth as it is on heaven”

he was indicating his expectation and desire that the culture of Heaven becomes the culture of Earth by way of his Church. But does Culture War Christianity, the sort launched in the ’70s, contradict the nature of Jesus’ Kingdom?

So many people had looked forward to the 20th century, hoping that because of all the new inventions, brought forward by the Industrial Revolution, they would be able to create a world where everything would be much easier and giving them more time to relax. The century opened with great hope but also with some apprehension, for the new century marked the final approach to a new millennium. For many, humankind was entering upon an unprecedented era. The English novelist, journalist, sociologist, and historian H.G. Wells’s utopian studies, the aptly titled Anticipations of the Reaction of Mechanical and Scientific Progress upon Human Life and Thought (1901) and A Modern Utopia (1905), both captured and qualified this optimistic mood and gave expression to a common conviction that science and technology would transform the world in the century ahead.

Already before the seventies of the previous century there was something going wrong in the industrialised world. Even though many countries were allowed to offer independence back to their colonies, they continued to exploit people in their own countries. Even when churches wanted to present God in different ways over the years, people should know That God never changes. He will always be the same and keep to the same Plan He had already from the beginning of times.

The American pastor and current PhD candidate in Theological Ethics at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland, Jared Stacy 
wants to call our attention to this basic theological ethic:

The work of God’s rule spreading throughout the world in individual lives and communities will never contradict who God is.

We would have loved that, but reality shows something totally different. For centuries, the main Christian churches have chosen another path than the disciples of Christ. The majority of people preferred to keep to their heathen traditions and festivals and the Catholic and several Protestant churches followed them and made Jesus Christ (the Messiah) their god. As such, we must say there is a lot of contradiction in what people say God is. For many, He is not the God of Christ, Who is the God of Israel, but is a god who is part of a three-headed godship, the Trinity.

It is not just that difference of who God is and who Christ is that has brought division in the world of believers. The diversity of religious groups has also brought both confusion and discord. Coming closer to the 21st-century tension or strife resulting from a lack of agreement came to bring even more separation between the true followers of the Nazarene Jewish masterteacher Jeshua  ben Joseph (Jesus Christ) and the name-Christians who worship Jesus as their god and do not shy away from also worshipping all kinds of people they call saints, this while the One True God desires full recognition and worship.

We have the impression that the blog writer who also writes for platforms like NPR, the BBC, Current, and For the Church, does not see (or does not know) the multiple camps in Christendom. He only mentions two of them. He writes

To speak generally, mischaracterizations come from two camps. Let’s call one group “conscientious objectors” and the other, “vocal advocates”.

Some accuse conscientious objectors to the Culture Wars of believing that Christianity should have no influence in the public square. They slander these conscientious objectors as faithless & godless, or misrepresent them as conspiratorially hypocritical, secretly harboring a progressive political agenda.

On the other end of the spectrum, some conscientious objectors accuse vocal advocates of conflating Christianity with cultural power. This often leads them to slander vocal advocates as compromising sell-outs, or mischaracterize their advocacy & well-connected influence as grounded in an inherently complicit conservative agenda. No doubt, I believe there are instances of legitimate criticisms from boths sides in Christian spaces. But polarity abounds.

For him the polarizing gap between vocal advocates and conscientious objectors reveals a vast “no man’s land” in American evangelicalism. This is why he believes his series has pastoral and personal implications for all of us.

Because either you or someone you know is wandering the no man’s land as a refugee from the Culture Wars.

Many American evangelicals are proud that they (so-called) keep to The 10 Commandments, though all of them already sin against the first commandment, not keeping to The Only One True God, the Elohim Hashem Jehovah of hosts, the God above all gods.

David Hansen correctly says

“The majority of Americans will tell any pollster that they believe in the Ten Commandments. But only a small percentage of those people could even recite the Ten Commandment; and even a smaller percentage have any genuine interest in following them.” {The 10 Commandments in American Culture}

Lots of North Americans should seriously think about their religion and their faith. About that faith Stacy says there is a danger.

On a day of hope, we need a fresh reminder of the danger inherent in an embrace of Christian faith. {The Danger of Faith}

He points out the trap many Americans have fallen into.

It is American consumer Christianity that invites us to “make Jesus Lord of our lives”. This pitch makes Christ a commodity, leaving us—the consumer—with control. The resurrection and ascension is a coronation that happens apart from our consumer choice & control. {The Danger of Faith}

1909 painting The Worship of Mammon, the god of material wealth, by Evelyn De Morgan

The great part of the US population, as well as in other developed countries, is that believers have deviated from Biblical truth as well as become wedded to matter and thus actually honour the god Mammon. Several denominations in the United States make clever use of asking people for money all the time, pretending that they will then have a better life. It has also become so ingrained in people that one can only be successful if one has acquired a lot of money. Consequently, many do everything possible to be as rich as possible (on the material plane) while completely neglecting spiritual wealth. Many have forgotten that it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than it is for a rich person to enter the kingdom of God.

Stacy writes

It is hard to deny today that for many, the supposed downfall of America is synonymous with the collapse of Christianity. Jesus confronts this idolatry with his Kingdom. {The Danger of Faith}

Lots of Americans are even not aware of how they participate in idolatry, which they prove by continually clinging to pagan festivals such as Candlemas, Easter, Halloween and Christmas, to name only the main ones, and to cling to money and material gain.

He reigns over a Kingdom that cannot be shaken through the rising and falling empires of this world. {The Danger of Faith}

And throughout history, many kingships or kingdoms and principalities as well as republics have risen and fallen. Never before has man succeeded in creating a nation or empire in which everyone was comfortable and where justice was done to everyone. Several Christians, in imitation of Christ, have tried to make people understand how best to live in unity with fellow human beings, plants and animals.

Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C. (Leaders marching from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial) - NARA - 542010.tif

The 1963 March on Washington participants and leaders marching from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial, as mass protest movement against racial segregation and discrimination in the southern United States that came to national prominence during the mid-1950s.

When we look at the German culture struggle of the 1870’s (kulturkampf) it’s clear that the American Civil Rights movement was a “Culture War” too. King’s commitment to non-violence laid a distinct Christian foundation for the Civil Rights movement. But white evangelicals of the time either distanced themselves from King, or denounced the Civil Rights movement entirely, with calls to “just preach the gospel.”  {A History Of The Culture Wars}

writes Stacy.

But not many white Americans were really willing to go to preach what was really written in the gospel. They prefer just to take some phrases out of context to repeat them so that people come to believe them.

The forty odd years from this origin point until today witnessed the end of the Cold War and an insurrection at the US Capitol. Between these bookends, Culture War Christianity made itself known & felt in American society through movements. (See, Kristin Kobes Du Mez, Jesus and John Wayne; Stan Gall, Borderlines: Reflections on Sex, War, and the Church; Frances Fitzgerald, The Evangelicals; Tim Gloege, Guaranteed Pure; historical treatments on these movements) {A History Of The Culture Wars}

Stacy reminds his readers:

The arguments and relationships in the antebellum South were transported via Lost Cause theology 100 years into the future, seen in white evangelical responses to the Civil Rights Movement. But these leaders could not ignore the impact of King’s kulturkampf. {A History Of The Culture Wars}

He assures his readers that

Culture War Christianity started after the Civil Rights Movement, not before. It borrows the playbook of the CRM. Ironically, it thrives on a sort of “persecuted minority” mindset, borrowed from the Civil Rights movement, but not actually indicative of the communal experience in its main constituents: white evangelicals. A minority mindset is a prominent characteristic of God’s people in the Scriptures. However, this mindset is not characteristic of evangelical experience in the United States. Race relations and evangelical’s historic participation in the moral establishment offer two historical keys that present a necessary critique of modern Culture War Christianity. {A History Of The Culture Wars}

He believes it is impossible to understand the history behind Culture War Christianity apart from race relations in the United States. So, we begin where we left off, with this statement:

The Culture Wars began when white American evangelicals took the activist playbook from the very Civil Rights leaders they opposed, to advance a moral agenda they could support.

Some were overtly political, like the Moral Majority or Christian Coalition. Others would serve the notion of family values, yet retain political influence, like Focus on the Family or Promise Keepers. Local churches and expansive media (books, radio, television) formed the local grassroots communities made these movements possible.

While this all may seem quite familiar, especially if you inhabited spaces within white American Christianity during the last 40 years, a history of the Culture Wars would be best served by going back 2 centuries to look at the phrase “Culture War” itself. {A History Of The Culture Wars}

In his blog he then goes back to the 19th century, across the Atlantic Ocean where the Germans provide us with a glimpse into a framework upstream to both the Civil Rights Movement and “Culture War Christianity” at a time when a new world order was being born. In that era, he recognises the central position of the Catholic Church, facing new threats to its grasp on power.

From the political power of the nation- state to the intellectual frameworks of liberalism and Darwinism, the winds were shifting. In response, the Church produced a flurry of theological statements and denouncements meant to stem the tide of ideas that threatened its hold on the Old World Order. {A History Of The Culture Wars}

File:Portrait pius ix.jpg

Portrait of Pope Pius IX circa 1864

The Holy See under Pope Pius IX on 8 December 1864, brought an appendix to the Quanta cura encyclical, with a syllabus where the church wanted to have the people see that it was with the times and recognised 80 of the

“principal errors of our times.”

As the errors listed had already been condemned in allocutions, encyclicals, and other apostolic letters, the Syllabus said nothing new and so could not be contested. Its importance lay in the fact that it published to the world what had previously been preached in the main only to the bishops, and that it made general what had been previously specific denunciations concerned with particular events. Perhaps the most famous article, the 80th, stigmatising as an error the view that

“the Roman Pontiff can and should reconcile himself to and agree with progress, liberalism, and modern civilisation,”

sought its authority in the pope’s refusal, in Jamdudum Cernimus, to have any dealings with the new Italian kingdom. On both scores, the Syllabus undermined the liberal Catholics’ position, for it destroyed their following among intellectuals and placed their program out of court.

The Church denounced religious liberty, the nation-state, and other consequences stemming from the “threat of liberalism.” {A History Of The Culture Wars}

For some time there had been bumbling or difficulty in having a good relationship with the Catholic Church. More thinkers also came to speak out about the huge profits the Church was making on the backs of the faithful. Increasingly, there was also the idea of going back to the basics of Christ’s teachings where simplicity was preached and people were taught how to stand up for and care for each other. In the gospel, Jesus set a good example of how not only Christians should live, but actually every human being.

In the 1870’s, the German people, specifically within the Kingdom of Prussia, found themselves in conflict with the Catholic Church over their own Reformation roots and a rapidly secularizing order. This conflict had ramifications for both the Church and the separated German states. As a result of this conflict swirling around the German peoples, individual German States united along highly Protestant lines under Otto Von Bismark of Prussia. (See, Helmut Walser Smith, editor, The Oxford Handbook of Modern German History) This period of conflict and change was given a name: Kulturkampf, or “Culture Struggle”. This German kulturkampf shows us how struggles between competing visions for human existence are sparked by complex reactions between religion, politics, and power. {A History Of The Culture Wars}

It is the clash between people of the common people, as well as philosophers and political thinkers, with the church, that caused very animated conversations in several places in the German Empire about faith, church, and the way we as human beings should choose to arrive at a better world.

After World War II several American religious groups tried to have the power over the American people. They tried to convince them that they were the sole church which preached the truth. Some even went so far to tell the people they were chosen by God and that their church is the only one that can bring them in heaven. For those churches, it is certain that one can only be accepted by God if one follows their rules. Of course, such a saying is absurd, but a large majority of Americans follow that false statement. In the life of faith, it is also certain that no particular church by Jesus was ever designated as the only one to follow.

By studying German kulturkampf, we can begin to see the American Culture War’s false claim to exclusivity and authority by claiming itself to be the sole representative and defender of orthodox Christianity. When we realize this — that American Culture War Christianity is not the single defender of the faith —  it trains us to adopt a healthy critical filter every time a Christian leader describes the “very survival of Christianity at stake” as a smoke screen for unChristian agreements with power. On the other hand, conscientious objectors to Culture War Christianity would do well to consider how “culture struggle” might be a positive expression of Christian faith. There is space to consider positive “culture struggle”. {A History Of The Culture Wars}

King’s kulturkampf was rooted in Christian principles, and sought to dismantle the injustices of racial segregation, subjugation and discrimination within America. With the upcoming of the more conservative Christians, and/or conservative evangelicals, the position between coloured people worsened again and nationalism and (far) right-wing ideas came to the forefront in the States, the same way they did in the 1930s in Europe. Thus, from Europe, we could see the very dangerous development of right-wing rule and the glorification of such despots as Donald Trump, who is a danger to the world.

What would come to define and shape Culture War Christianity in 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s in the US is not at all what King and several serious preachers had in mind. The growing conservatism by the Americans brought forward people who are against equality and who find the white man is the pure race. Even Billy Graham came to criticise segregation but also denounced the non-violent demonstrations as contributing to further violence.

Others denounced calls for desegregation entirely. Back in 1960, Bob Jones Sr. took harder lines at Christians supporting an end to segregation by referring to them as “religious infidels”. {A History Of The Culture Wars}

Several pastors of mega-churches, especially in white neighbourhoods, succeeded in shifting all the faults of the system onto the backs of the blacks and refugees who just’ came and invaded America’, without the government doing enough to stop them. One would think the religious leaders would have their moral reasoning to flow from a theological calculus, but it (for sure) did not come from Biblical teaching.

Stacy writes

Charles Ivory’s masterful Proslavery Christianity examines the white evangelical relationship with black evangelicals before the Civil War. He looks at how these interactions between white and black Christians, slave and free, actually came to shape the white evangelical theological defense of slavery. If we want to understand the Culture War Christianity of Falwell, and other white evangelicals, we need to examine their response to the Civil Rights Movement. I believe their response has its source in the theological calculus of white evangelicals in the antebellum South. {A History Of The Culture Wars}

Ivory writes it was not uncommon for white and black evangelicals to worship within the same church. Indeed, the revival of the late 18th century did not discriminate on the basis of cultural background. But the theological conflict in evangelical churches pre-Civil War centered around conversion. Namely, does Christian conversion necessitate manumission? Today, Christians would argue chattel slavery is indefensible regardless of a slave’s conversion to Christianity. Humanity is not property. However, the historical context of the time made the question of conversion and manumission the frontline theological conflict regarding chattel slavery within evangelical churches. {A History Of The Culture Wars}

In West Europe the people had gone already through that process, knowing that slavery was something one could not accept in a civilised society. On this, several speakers came to draw attention to a system to bring more equality among all people. The road to socialism and communism was thus promoted by several enthusiasts.

Culture War Christianity has long since ossified into the de facto expression of faith for many white American evangelicals.

But those white American Christians have come to love themselves more than someone else and consider themselves as the only ones worthy to govern America. They do not have an eye at all for the indigenous people, because they consider themselves as the rightful founders and owners of America.

For 200 years, white evangelicalism has been an insider. No where has the minority mindset been more pervasive in our modern conception of Culture War Christianity than rhetoric. Phrases like “drain the swamp”, “make America great again”, and “take back America for God” in evangelical politics go right next to “that’s too political” and “just preach the gospel” in evangelical churches. {A History Of The Culture Wars}

We can wonder from who those evangelicals have to take back ‘their country’! Those evangelicals seem not to have any idea what the ‘founders’ of America had in mind and why they wanted religion and government separated.

While separation of church and state was federally enshrined in the Constitution, it did not play out in those strict terms in state and local governments. This changed in the early 20th century, when the Scopes trial, New Deal politics, and internal theological warring between fundamentalists and modernists left a vacuum in American society that evangelicalism used to fill in common culture. Neo-evangelicals like Billy Graham emerged in this vacuum. But for the long of American history, Christians have not only been influential, but privileged.

How can a privileged majority come to see itself as a minority? Culture War Christianity accomplishes this in part by dressing itself in the Biblical and theological concept of a remnant. A faithful few of God’s people who remain loyal to God and his ways in a foreign, godless land. But this theological adaptation does not line up with the historical participation of white evangelicals in the moral establishment of the United States. Yet, the drums of Culture War for white American Christians implied a greater enemy beyond its borders. {A History Of The Culture Wars}

Though the big problem of those Tea Party and conservative or fundamentalist evangelicals is that they are not at all remaining “loyal to God and his ways in a foreign, godless land” they even have betrayed God and His son on several levels. They have created some three-headed god (or three-une being) and political leaders such as Trump as their gods, and consider their American flag as their religious symbol even a Christian symbol. For sure they can not belong to the faithful few of God’s people, because they do not believe in the Only One True God and because they do not act like People of God. They themselves are part of that ‘dark world’ the Bible is talking about. And now in those times that darkness and of gloominess can be seen everywhere, they also do everything to create division and spread hate, instead of spreading the love of Christ and his great message of a world full of peace. Those evangelicals with other name Christians have made it a sport to make fun of, blacken and curse true Christians. They do everything possible to get people away from those true worshippers of God. They also have some sort of paranoia and consider all people from abroad as dangerous suspects. They fear those coming from outside America would destroy their freedom.

Stacy remarks

the drums of Culture War for white American Christians implied a greater enemy beyond its borders. {A History Of The Culture Wars}

and also see what happened under the influence of certain political figures.

The Culture Wars of white American evangelicalism was not the reaction of the minority against the majority, but the majority against a imagined majority. It is hard to avoid this conclusion given overwhelming support for President Trump. {A History Of The Culture Wars}

Stacy continues writing

In the place of Jesus’ active reign today, we find American Christians given to other reigning power structures: nationalism, racism, misogyny, and bigotry. They are discipled by political—not resurrection—power. This is partly the reason why Culture War Christians took greater issue with Kaepernick’s supposed desecration of the flag than they might with his concerns over police brutality against image bearers. They operate in a power structure other than the Kingdom of Jesus. {A Theology of Culture War Christianity}

Stacys wonders

What if Culture War Christianity long ago bowed the knee to a nationalist, secular conservatism? One with its law & order politics, reticence on issues of race, and idolatry of country? {Beyond the Culture Wars}

Ans says that he has argued this in his series.

Long before white evangelicals told MLK to “just preach the gospel”, there has always been a Christianity domesticated by, and deployed in defense of, the status quo in this country. Frederick Douglass called it before any of us. And in this sort of Christianity, “make disciples” has too often been code for “make people like us” not “make us like Jesus”. {Beyond the Culture Wars}

There lies one of the biggest problems in American Christendom. The majority of Americans does not take time enough to seriously study the Scriptures. For most of them the Bible also only means the New Testament. Lots of those evangelicals also do not understand what that sacrificial offering of Jesus, letting himself be nailed at the stake, means. For them it is very difficult to grasp how a man of flesh and blood could give himself as a lamb for whitewashing the sins of many.

Some of those white evangelicals living in the United States of America are convinced they are the only ones who can  Make America Great Again and build up the most correct state. They forget how so many people before them have tried already to construct an ideal state. They should know it shall only happen under Jesus Christ that we shall be able to live in a perfect world.

Let us also not forget Niebuhr’s saying,

“any good worth doing takes more than one lifetime.”

According to Jared Stacy

This should give us pause before we entertain pragmatism to bring about change in our lifetime. It was Jesus who said,

“what does it profit a man to gain the whole world, and lose his soul?”

This should give us pause as we count the cost of pragmatism to reveal the Kingdom of God. {Beyond the Culture Wars}

He ends his article series by saying

After all, the cross is not a symbol of cultural superiority for white America, but of surrender and sacrifice in the Kingdom of God. We must measure our motivations by the Cross, and our methods. Take it from me. A millennial. The generation who was born in and shaped by the ‘Jesus & John Wayne evangelicalism” in its prime. {Beyond the Culture Wars}

And recognises the problem

Culture War Christianity allows you to have a Christian worldview and reject the Cross.   {Beyond the Culture Wars}

By which he hopefully means: rejecting the ransom offering of that Jewish Nazarene master teacher, Jeshua ben Josef, or Jesus Christ, the Messiah.

It substitutes other, more pragmatic means to really get things done. But in the Kingdom of Jesus the only strategy available for implementing a Christian worldview is the Cross.  {Beyond the Culture Wars}

We have to do away with the false teaching in Christendom and have to go back to the Biblical teachings and keep to them, adhering to Biblical Truth and not human doctrine.

We should recognise the danger of that growing conservative evangelism.

For all it’s posturing about the morality of America, Culture War Christianity has stopped its ear to calls for ethnic & economic justice. Has tied its hands in response to sexual scandal and abuse in its ranks. Yet expresses incredulity when the world fails to take its sexual ethic seriously. Culture War Christianity can only provide more entrenchment, more combat, and more pragmatism. But crucified Christianity is growing the world over, and—as it has always done— turning the world upside down.  {Beyond the Culture Wars}

Writing from Scotland, the author of the mentioned articles, wants to suggest a simple but humble invitation to venture into the wilderness as an act of faithfulness. For him,

the wilderness meant stepping out of the American pastorate, and out of America. This was my move made in faith. An attempt to combat the rise of cynicism in my own spirit, channeling it into meaningful, faithful action.  {Beyond the Culture Wars}

From Moses, to Elijah, to Christ. Perhaps the wilderness is the place for those disenchanted and disillusioned, those disowned and disinherited from Culture War Christianity, to begin to see the Cross not as a symbol storming the US Capitol, but again as a place where our power grabs go to die. And where there is death to our ability to bring about change, God brings resurrection that changes everything.  {Beyond the Culture Wars}

The Austrian philosopher and Roman Catholic priest known for his radical polemics arguing that the benefits of many modern technologies and social arrangements were illusory and that, still further, such developments undermined humans’ self-sufficiency, freedom, and dignity, Ivan Illich illumines what it is to be in the world, but not of it — just like Jesus.

Jared Stacy offers his words as a simple reflection in the conclusion to his series:

It is astonishing what the devil says: I have all power, it has been given to me, and I am the one to hand it on — submit, and it is yours. Jesus of course does not submit…Not for a moment, however, does Jesus contradict the devil. He does not question that the devil holds all power, nor that this power has been given to him, nor that he, the devil, gives it to whom he pleases. This is a point which is easily overlooked. By his silence Jesus recognizes power that is established as “devil” and defines Himself as The Powerless. He who cannot accept this view on power cannot look at establishments through the spectacle of the Gospel. This is what clergy and churches often have difficulty doing. They are so strongly motivated by the image of church as a “helping institution” that they are constantly motivated to hold power, share in it or, at least, influence it.  {Beyond the Culture Wars}

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Please also do find to read

  1. Utopism has not ended
  2. Looking at an Utopism which has not ended
  3. My faith and hope
  4. Utopian dreams
  5. Are Christianity and Capitalism Compatible?
  6. The Upbringing of Ideas and the Extrapolation of Capitalism
  7. A famous individual by the name of Jesus of Nazareth
  8. 19th and 20th Century Shifts in bourgeoisie
  9. All that is solid still melts into air.
  10. Intellectual servility a curse of mankind
  11. The New Imperialist Structure
  12. Is Christianity a Greedy Religion?
  13. Should church members question preachers about the doctrine that is not in the Holy Bible?
  14. A History Of The Culture Wars
  15. Unhappy people in empty churches
  16. Gradual decline by American Christians
  17. Christians are increasingly mixing and matching their faith in unexpected ways
  18. Being Christian in Western Europe at the beginning of the 21st century #1
  19. The decline of religion in the US continues unabated
  20. Liberation, salvation and the Latin American voice entering the Vatican
  21. Eyes on pages and messages on social media
  22. Troubles testing your faith and giving you patience and good prospects
  23. The Most Appropriate teacher and Scoffers in our contemporary age
  24. Social media for Trumpists and changing nature of warfare
  25. Blinded crying blue murder having being made afraid by a bugaboo
  26. False teachers and false prophets still around
  27. The Field is the World #4 Many who leave the church
  28. Unhappy people in empty churches (Our World)
  29. Hardships for choosing to follow the real Christ
  30. Church indeed critical in faith development
  31. Crises of Real, Imaginary, and Symbolic Money
  32. International Proletariat
  33. The killing of capitalism
  34. The Principles of Communism – Friedrich Engels
  35. Ability
  36. Ability (part 2)
  37. Ability (part 3) Thoughts around Ability
  38. Ability (part 4) Thought about the ability to have ability
  39. Ability (part 5) Thought about the abilities to be under God’s Spirit
  40. To whom do we want to be enslaved
  41. Compromise and accomodation
  42. A Living Faith #3 Faith put into action
  43. Not saying Jeshua is God
  44. The 17th annual White Privilege Conference a militantly Christophobic conference held in Philadelphia
  45. Faith, storms and actions to be taken
  46. Christ’s ethical teaching
  47. Obeying God rather than man & A Time to Act
  48. Entering 2022 still Aiming for a society without exploitation or oppression
  49. News that’s fit to print
  50. Beyond the Culture Wars
  51. January 6: A Failed Apocalypse
  52. Hope For, But Not In, Evangelicalism
  53. Presbyterians and Reformed Christians, membership and active involvement is part of a congregation’s DNA
  54. The Guardian’s view on the world 1st week of June

+++

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  1. The Basic Principle of Establishing Equality Among all the Children of Adam (as)
  2. The Pharaoh and The Worker | From Ancient Egypt to The Communist Manifesto
  3. (Sunday Homily) Christianity Is Communism! Jesus Was a Communist!
  4. Bernie Reminds Us that Christianity Is Communism & Jesus Was a Communist!
  5. 7th Century Madina Economics
  6. Religion and the Rise of Capitalism
  7. Karl Marx
  8. Marx, Labor Rights and Reform in Capitalism
  9. Das Kapital (Karl Marx)
  10. Cultural Marxism versus Marx
  11. Karl Marx – the prophet of goons – Part 3
  12. All that is solid still melts into air.
  13. Wage Differentials or Discrimination: Islamic Perspective
  14. Marxists Changed How We Understand History
  15. Finding the Ideal, Perfect Community
  16. Alternative Earth
  17. Utopia! 
  18. Utopia – Thomas More ****
  19. Anarchy, State and Utopia
  20. Postalgia / Prostalgia – Is this as Good as it Gets?
  21. The Age of Surveillance Capitalism
  22. Cultural Amnesia
  23. The Future of Governance
  24. False American Dream
  25. Thinking Critically about Marxism, Socialism and Communism (All in fewer than 1000 words!)
  26. The Missing Faith Dimension of the Capitalism vs. Socialism Debate
  27. A Broken system
  28. Psychological Warfare
  29. Humanities Retribution
  30. Walk The Path
  31. Reform or Revolution? A Debate (I)
  32. Reform or Revolution? A Debate (II)
  33. Editorial: what is humane socialism?
  34. The virtues of good, enlightened, accountable elitism
  35. The Radical Left Needs to Call into Question Existing Social Institutions at Every Opportunity, Part Four
  36. End of capitalism as we know it
  37. The Future is History
  38. The true believer
  39. Research Resources: Communism in America
  40. “A Spectre is Haunting Europe…”
  41. Finding the Ideal, Perfect Community
  42. So You Think Capitalism Is Evil
  43. Capitalism: The Ultimate Empowerment
  44. Capitalism: Misunderstood
  45. On the Current Conjuncture
  46. The discipled political church
  47. Veneration (Gilbert and Gilbert)
  48. Christianity and Idealism (Van Til)
  49. Brief Insights on Mastering Bible Doctrine (Heiser)
  50. A Field Guide on False Teaching
  51. Andrew McWilliams-Doty looks at evangelicals
  52. Evangelical: Leave It or Love It?
  53. How the term Evangelical has grown to blur theology and ideology
  54. Bad Religion: How We Became a Nation of Heretics – An Interview
  55. Which Christians Actually Evangelize
  56. Is it Time to Abandon “Evangelical?”
  57. Warped Christianity
  58. The 10 Commandments in American Culture
  59. Communist Infiltration, What Did Bella Dodd REALLY Know – YouTube
  60. German priest contradicts pope and backs pornography as sexual ‘relief’ for celibates | Catholic News Agency
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  62. What is at stake in the buffer zone debate? | Isabel Vaughan-Spruce | The Critic Magazine
  63. Win for Christian ministry after judge refuses to strike out discrimination case – Christian Concern
  64. Watch the body language in this heated exchange yesterday between Canada’s Justin Trudeau and Chinese Emperor Xi 👀 | Not the Bee
  65. Episode 21 – Stella(r) (Hypo)Creasy and the Gov Crackdown on Free Speech – YouTube
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  67. America/Brazl – After 50 years, the mission of Cimi is still “to defend with courage and prophecy the cause of the indigenous peoples” – Agenzia Fides
  68. The Christian Father -Conferences of the Men’s Group – YouTube

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Filed under Being and Feeling, Economical affairs, History, Lifestyle, Political affairs, Religious affairs, Social affairs, Welfare matters, World affairs

Cutting costs by discounted produce

As inflation in Great Britain reached 11.1pc in October, with food prices soaring even further – fuelled in particular by a significant rise in the cost of dairy products such as cheese and milk, as well as pasta, eggs and oils supermarket Tesco found it appropriate to have their customers looking at their reduced prices goods in a different way.

The third-largest retailer in the world measured by gross revenues and the ninth-largest in the world measured by revenues, the British multinational Tesco, headquartered in Welwyn Garden City, England, renamed the “Reduced to Clear” section of their supermarkets to make it more appealing to customers, as a growing number of shoppers look to discounted produce to cut costs.

Tesco

The new permanent signage will be installed in 100 stores by Christmas Credit: Tesco/PA

The look of the chain’s “Reduced to Clear” areas were found to have put buyers off the same as we can find it here in Belgium when chains mark their goods with “Reduced in price due to out of range” or “Nearly out of date”.

When the supermarket indicates that a product has expired, hardly anyone wants such a product. But if a product is close to its expiry date, this does not mean that the product (with its shelf life) is bad then or even in the first few days after. The bottom line is that we should be much more careful with our food and not just throw it away when the so-called safety date has passed.

As we have seen the prices of gas, electricity, petrol, petroleum and food skyrocket in our parts in recent months, consumers have resolved to get their supplies as cheaply as possible.

Of those who tend to look out for marked down products when out grocery shopping, a lot of customers look for reduced prices. In Britain 71pc said it’s a cheaper option when they want to eat the food straight away, whereas 51pc seek out discounted foodstuffs to stock up the freezer.

Tesco’s rebranded “Reduced in Price” section aims to accommodate customers by offering cheaper alternatives. It will

“offer reassurance that these products are just as nice”

as the non-discounted ones, the retailer has said.

Tesco offers fresh produce such as salads, meat, bread and sweet treats which are close to their expiry date at a discount to get them off the shelves – which the company says also helps to reduce food waste.

Shoppers can also pick up marked-down end-of-season produce or discontinued grocery items.

Meat products were the most popular items in the “Reduced to Clear” section, followed by ready meals, vegetables and then desserts.

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Filed under Ecological affairs, Economical affairs, Food, Headlines - News, Lifestyle, Welfare matters, World affairs

Our existence, the world showing up for us and holding up a mirror

The world doesn’t just exist, it shows up for us. It appears as the pure experience of the present moment. And one of the most amazing things about the world is that it changes – from age to age, generation to generation, over the course of a human lifetime.

We can not ignore the world. We live in it, and we have to face those things that happen in that world. Today it would even be very difficult to live on a desert island just to live on our own without any interruption or interference from other human beings.

We are here and though others can ignore us, we can not ignore them nor deny our own existence. We have our fleshy bodies within it our brains which enable us to think and reason. From the moment we are born we are confronted with the world and shall have to learn to live in that world. From that first step on earth, time does not let us on our own but however we want, time binds us to itself. It makes hours, days, months and years go by while we have to hold in it and come to the realisation that we are getting older. However, we turn it or turn it and look for the ‘why’ we are here and the ‘how’ we can make it true here, we are pulled in all directions to do this or that or to be here and there.

Sometimes we even wonder not only why we exist, but also why this world and this universe exist. Lots of people also wonder what there would be in outer space. In the darkness behind the horizon, stars and planets get us dreaming of other planets and perhaps also about other living beings. Why should we be the only intellectual beings?

When we see time passing, we often feel as if we are running out of time. Looking at how glaciers melt and how waters rise, but so many in the world do not want to believe climate change is a serious business and that we are heading for an unseen natural disaster if we do not act quickly to combat global warming.

If nothing existed there would be nothing to contemplate existence and no existence to contemplate. Now we have to think about a lot of things. In fact, it happens that our brains don’t let us rest easy and get our heads spinning with all sorts of (sometimes foolish) thoughts.

Why did anything happen?

Why didn’t nothing happen?

Why did all those planets came into existence?

Why does anything at all exist?

What does it mean to exist?

Why did man came into existence and why does he thinks he is superior to all other beings?

Why are we here?

What is life all about? or What is the purpose of existence?

Is that what we think to see realy there? Or is it just an illusion?

Philosophers through all ages have tackled this most fundamental question of existence. Many persons came to practice or investigate the systematised study of general and fundamental questions, such as those about existence, reason, knowledge, values, mind, and language. There was and is the searching, the rational, abstract, and methodical consideration of reality as a whole or of fundamental dimensions of human existence and experience. We know of major Eastern philosophers, like Buddha; Confucius; Dai Zhen; Han Feizi; Laozi; Mencius; Mozi; Nichiren; Nishida Kitarō; Wang Yangming; Xunzi; Zhu Xi.

But in the West, they did not have to undercut and could in turn make others think and philosophise with a variety of thoughts. There were many Ancient Greek philosophers, like Aristotle and his followers, who brought a whole movement into being,  Aristotelianism. Epicurus and Epicureanism.
The Western world provided lots of major Western philosophers, like Peter Abelard; St. Anselm; St. Thomas Aquinas; St. Augustine; Noam Chomsky; Jacques Derrida; Duns Scotus; Michel Foucault; Jürgen Habermas; Martin Heidegger; David Hume; William James; Saul Kripke; Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz; John Locke; John Stuart Mill; Friedrich Nietzsche; Hilary Putnam; Jean-Jacques Rousseau; Bertrand Russell; Jean-Paul Sartre; Socrates; Benedict de Spinoza; Bernard Williams; Ludwig Wittgenstein, and so many more who request our attention.

Some of those philosophers from the east and west will tell you that everything that we experience as real is an illusion. Especially in Eastern philosophies, we find ‘masters’ or ‘teachers’ who will say this is all a dream.

Could it be that we are part of a dream or living in some surreal universe?

And is there some Being managing it all?

Is there a Creator or Manipulator? And are we just His toys?

We may see all this physical stuff around us, but in which way is it real, or do we get to know how it really is?

Over the years, mankind had to change its views about so many things. More than once, man had it wrong. More often there were groups of people or organisations, who wanted to have control over people and made it a rule or doctrine that people had to believe. The Roman Catholic Church was (and is still) a master in that.

Many people have high ideas about themselves. Sometimes it happens that they suddenly become confronted with themselves and have to come to see that their thoughts and emotions are ‘nothing’. It is all, they will say, the play of pure consciousness. John Locke considered “the perception of what passes in a man’s own mind” man’s consciousness.

Pure being is all that really is. Everything else is an illusion created in an ungraspable field of consciousness, awareness and sentience. Some philosophers regarded it as a kind of substance, or “mental stuff,” quite different from the material substance of the physical world. From such philosophers’ ideas many started to believe we exist out of more than one element. They managed to have several people believe that when they die that there is a spiritual element (the soul) that will go to other places (like purgatory, hell or heaven) and another physical element that will transform into another body (incarnation and reincarnation). That reincarnation, also called transmigration or metempsychosis, in religion and philosophy, would be a rebirth of the aspect of an individual that persists after bodily death — whether it be consciousness, mind, the soul, or some other entity — in one or more successive existences. Depending upon the tradition, these existences may be human, animal, spiritual, or, in some instances, vegetable, depending on the way one lived before.

The French mathematician, scientist, and philosopher René Descartes for instance as one of the first to abandon Scholastic Aristotelianism, formulated the first modern version of mind-body dualism, from which stems the mind-body problem. Because he promoted the development of a new science grounded in observation and experiment, he is generally regarded as the founder of modern philosophy. We all know his expression

“I think, therefore I am” (best known in its Latin formulation, “Cogito, ergo sum,” though originally written in French, “Je pense, donc je suis”).

The medieval English logician St. Anselm of Canterbury (1033/34–1109), is at the heart of Descartes’s rationalism, the view that regards reason as the chief source and test of knowledge, knowledge about an existing thing solely on the basis of reasoning from innate ideas, with no help from sensory experience. Descartes has an innate idea of Allah Al-Aliyy or Most High God, being The Sublime God as a perfect being. For him, it is clear that God necessarily exists, because, if He did not, He would not be perfect. It is That God Who presides in the great assembly (Psalm 82:1) of human beings, who often think they are greater than others.

Jim Holt, the American journalist, author in popular science and essayist, who often contributed to The New York Times, wrote the nonfiction work and NYTimes bestseller for 2013, Why Does the World Exist?, presented the central question ‘Why is there something rather than nothing?’, which lies in the domain between philosophy and scientific cosmology. Also the English cosmologist and astrophysicist Martin Rees looked at the big-bang theory of the origins of the universe. By examining the nature of existence itself Holt was following in the path of the philosophy called ‘Existentialism’, which stresses human existence in the world concreteness and its problematic character. for those writers ‘Existence’ is primarily the problem of existence (i.e., of its mode of being); it is, therefore, also the investigation of the meaning of Being. Going back to the intitial thought of previous philosophers

What is Being?

What does it mean to be?

To be is the question!

What does it mean to exist?

What is the nature of being?

For the German philosopher, counted among the main exponents of existentialism, Martin Heidegger, the human subject had to be reconceived in an altogether new way, as “being-in-the-world.” Because this notion represented the very opposite of the Cartesian “thing that thinks,” the idea of consciousness as representing the mind’s internal awareness of its own states had to be dropped. With it went the assumption that specific mental states were needed to mediate the relation of the mind to everything outside it.

Man philosophers had the above questions, bringing them to think about their own being and the being of others around them. Those people thinking and writing about those life questions bring the deep contemplation of what it means to be human. We think no other living being is concerned with such questions. Even pets don’t wonder what their role in the family might be (we think). Even though plants and animals have sentience, we suspect that they have no thinking capacity whereby they would ascertain their essence in this world.

On the other hand, it can well be that one of the reasons that other creatures don’t worry about the meaning of life could be that they don’t seem to have any choice about how to live it. Dogs and cats just live the way dogs and cats live. They respond to circumstances the way dogs or cats generally do. Sure they may differ one to the other, but generally speaking they act more or less predictably like dogs or cats.

But human beings can also be very predictable. We also could say human beings act in a similar way. Many people around us are also very predictable. Though we can notice that even when the majority lives a standard way of living, we can find people who follow a totally different course. There are human beings who stand out and surprise us. We also find several people who do not want to follow the tract the majority follows. They don’t live an ordinary life. They live an extraordinary life, that is remarkably new and different from the norm. And sometimes these rare human beings discover a way of being that eventually becomes the new norm.

Martin Heidegger was convinced that the history of Western thought has failed to heed the ontological difference, and so has articulated Being precisely as a kind of ultimate being, as evidenced by a series of namings of Being, for example as idea, energeia, substance, monad or will to power. He recognised that most of us live as ‘the one’, or that we do generally what ‘one’ does or what would be the general norm to do. Though we are often concerned with what ‘one’ tends to be concerned with.

He spoke about “Dasein” or “being there”, the most fundamental a priori transcendental condition or mode of being not so much to be seen from the point of being there but from the perspective of how the being essentially unfolds. As Heidegger puts it:

“A being is: Be-ing holds sway [unfolds]”.

The hyphenated term ‘be-ing’ is adopted by Emad and Maly, in order to respect the fact that, in the Contributions, Heidegger substitutes the archaic spelling ‘Seyn’ for the contemporary ‘Sein’ as a way of distancing himself further from the traditional language of metaphysics.

We all should be aware that somehow we come on this planet and have to make the best of it. We receive an overdose of information during our lifetime and are fed an untold number of knowledges and rules, with which and by which we try or must try to live. Through all these influences we have to go through, we have to try to build our lives and live a generic human life.

Unlike the rest of the animal kingdom, a human being could, if they were heroic enough, choose to live a different kind of human life and could come to live a profoundly authentic and original human life. The American lecturer, poet, and essayist, the leading exponent of New England Transcendentalism, Ralph Waldo Emerson called such human beings ‘representative’ because their lives represented new possibilities for being human.

I do not think “Life is But a Dream” even when we may dream that we live or imagine our life to be a certain way. When we are dreaming it can well be that we are not aware that we are asleep. But also when we are awake it can happen that we wonder if we are dreaming, because what we encounter seems to be so unreal. How often does it not happen that we must come to the conclusion that we were in a dream-world. And that dream world was not always to our liking. More than once the dream world that comes into our mind, is one that can cause fear, but luckilly there is also that dream world that causes joy, surprise, and myriad other emotions. Dreams take us, seemingly, to worlds we’ve been to and worlds that we have never experienced. In them we re-live what we lived before in that world we should recognise as the real world. But we should be aware that very often we are deceived by the real world around us. Often we do not want to know that this world has played tricks on us.

Every day we have doubts about certain things, often which we should recognise as facts. There and then we once more are confronted with those questions that come up into our mind so often. Oh, so often we are troubled, and question our own self and all the things we see happening around us. Then we might ask

What is our role in this all?

What happens when we become older?

As time passes we start getting in contact with other peoples and other cultures. Mostly how we grow up is decided by our parents and our surroundings. The culture of our homeland, the religion of our parents, and the friends we hang out with, all influence us and mould us in a form we do not mind or which bothers us. In case we do not like the form in which we are moulded we get frustrated and come into a stressful position. sometimes people would love to have been born in an other place or have lived in other circumstances. But the choice is not up to us. We are dropped in a time and place and have to find our way in it.

We have no memory of a previous life, because there is just not such another life.

Could we prove that we have ever lived if we did not have our memories?

No, there would be no way to prove it. There is not one person who ever could recollect and prove some previous existence. Even for those who are born, when young, their memory is too short and after some time they shall not be able to tell what happened in those first years of life. When you would ask a toddler to prove he lives, he would not be able to do so, because he has not enough memory and not enough knowledge. The very young cannot prove they live because they do not have memories. Memory starts to develop a bit later than the first few years of life. Memory is an essential component to the human mind, so important that we cannot say that we exist without memory. Knowledge and memory are two requirements to realise that one is alive and can be. In other words, our very existence is hinged on our capacity to remember. Without our capacity to think, or to have thoughts, we can not remember nor can we analyse. And to be able to know we live we need to be able to think, consider and to review.

Memory, as the encoding, storage, and retrieval in the human mind of past experiences, is unconditionally linked to thought and being. Without awareness, there is no knowledge of being. We can notice this when people have reached an age when they start to suffer from dementia. It is then as if their thinking but also their “being” falls away.

Memory is both a result of and an influence on perception, attention, and learning. It is those thoughts of past events and influences that help shape us, making us who we are. With that awareness and understanding of that event and of that personality we are confronted with, we ourselves are presented with a mirror, in which whether or not we will accept, love or hate that reflection. But dar we will recognise that this is that “I” that we wish, desire or curse.

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Preceding

With Positive Attitude

There can only be hope when there is a will to be and say “I am”

I and Thou

Our existence..

Leap

To come to live in the peace of fulfilment of our own Divine Identity

What is Existential Ergonomics?

On the Anxiety of Non-Being

Running out of time

Why does the world exist

Our real self ever perfect and free

Life’s Purpose

Modern Living

Quandary of Reflections

Existence in the non-existent and non-existence in the existence

Human experience maintained in a fragile existence

Soul-searching

Vivamos Videre, the more we live, the more we are a witness to life

++

Additional reading

  1. Immortality, eternality – onsterfelijkheid, eeuwigheid
  2. Onsterfelijkheid – Immortaliteit – Immortality
  3. About The story of Creation 1 Existing cosmologies
  4. Genesis Among the Creation Myths
  5. Creator and Blogger God 1 Emptiness and mouvement
  6. Creation of the earth and man #14 Formation of man #6 The Uncreated One, neshemet ruach chayim and nephesh
  7. Jesus begotten Son of God #11 Existence and Genesis Raising up
  8. A Living Faith #10: Our manner of Life #2
  9. Ability
  10. Ability (part 2)
  11. Ability (part 3) Thoughts around Ability
  12. Ability (part 4) Thought about the ability to have ability
  13. The Opinionated Truth
  14. God make us holy
  15. Two states of existence before God
  16. Self-development, self-control, meditation, beliefs and spirituality
  17. Wisdom Quote #21…..seeking within with Carl Jung!
  18. Living in this world and viewing it

+++

Related

  1. Who am I to…?
  2. Spike the obit
  3. Awareness is All
  4. Trouble being myself
  5. #being as details
  6. Conditioning and Consciousness
  7. Becoming
  8. What Descartes Proved
  9. The ABCs of Python: The Identity of “is”
  10. When I sleep, I think, I dream [A philosophy post?]
  11. Wisdom Collection Collection 26. Human thinking is a creation process with devastating results. Thinking is separation of myself from my source.
  12. Mind and language essays on descartes and chomsky
  13. Therefore (Quote Series)
  14. Essays on the philosophy and science of rene descartes
  15. Descartes proof for the existence of god essay
  16. My favorites: philosophy ideas
  17. I remember therefore I am
  18. Descartes, Perception, and Society
  19. Strange nonsense
  20. Perception and Reality
  21. How Ego Disrupts the Cosmic Brilliance of ‘Is’
  22. I am
  23. What is Left to Doubt?
  24. Life is But a Dream
  25. In here and out there
  26. Confusion of knights
  27. Awareness, Consciousness, Experience, Mind
  28. Interlude: Descartes’ Role
  29. Descartes
  30. Consciousness, Personhood
  31. St. Borges of Canterbury
  32. Spirituality of the Left
  33. Breakthrough
  34. The floating consciousness
  35. Useful Heideggerian Concepts
  36. At The Existentialist Cafe by Sarah Bakewell is a biography of existentialism
  37. Martin Heidegger, the Standing Metaphor, and the Politics of 1935
  38. Time and Being
  39. Heidegger and the Question of Being
  40. Existential Reflections: The Shadow Side of Human Existence (2)
  41. Second Principle- Freedom in Being
  42. Every man is born as many men and dies as a single one.
  43. The ‘Man for All Seasons’ and Ontological Exigency
  44. Martin Heidegger Quotes
  45. Religion, Consumerism, and Absurdism: Modernity and the Quest for Meaning
  46. Two reviews of The Early Foucault (Polity, 2021) by Colin Koopman and Jasper Friedrich – and a note on Heidegger
  47. [Reflections] Why Does the History of Philosophy Matter to Philosophy?
  48. Modern Transcendentalism
  49. Ralph Waldo Emerson
  50. American Voices: Ralph Waldo Emerson
  51. Transcendentalism literary origins in america and influence essay
  52. Living in Subversia
  53. Ernest Holmes and the Science of Mind Part One: ‘Ye Are Gods’
  54. What are the main features of Shelley’s Transcendentalism ?
  55. Autumn, Concord, and Transcendentalism
  56. Transcendentalism : An American Movement
  57. Self-Awareness, Self-Reliance and Non-Comformity

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Permacrisis a permanent part of the human condition

Permacrisis = caught by Collins Dictionaries’ word of the year, defined as “an extended period of instability and insecurity, especially one resulting from a series of catastrophic events”.

Permacrisis is not something new, but a permanent part of the human condition.
War, disease, financial disaster – these are not phenomena from the distant past or faraway countries of which we know little.
They have been with us, even here in the UK, all along.

it is not because the world has changed, but because we have.
Rather than seeing change, disruption and unexpected events for what they are, part of life, to which we must adapt,
we have come to think that they cannot, or should not, happen here.
Nothing really bad should happen in Britain. If it does, the Government should protect us.
Normal life should be smooth, unchallenging, and undisrupted.The problem is that, when we begin to think like this, we stop being resilient and start to become fragile. Great world events and the changes they bring seem abnormal, not part of the routine of human existence.

Every risk looms large and the world seems more dangerous than ever.
Then begins a vicious circle in which government must shield us from more and more difficulties.
We start in a world where the state bails out banks but end in one where it caps energy prices, subsidises people to go to work, and restricts our behaviour for our own good – and who knows what next.~ The real permacrisis is in Western civilisation

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Invitation to the news platform that brings a view of the world

Dear Reader,

There is so much news — and too many voices — competing for your attention today.

Do you know that we provide a site where we present news from all over the world and do not mind going deeper into certain facets of facts everyone should know or should receive attention (according to us) .

Some view on the World”  does just that what the title of the website is called. It wishes to bring a view of world affairs. It wants to be a Journal for you and provides unbiased news and perspective to keep you well-informed and entertained.

In addition to general press reviews, you will be able to find articles that deal with environmental issues and take a closer look at how we, as human beings, must take responsibility, not only ethically and politically, but how we must behave towards other living beings and respect nature. Towards respecting other beings, racial discrimination comes to the fore, but also how we in the West sometimes look strangely at other cultures. We believe that getting to know other cultures and religions better can help to better understand and accept “that otherness of those people”. In today’s society, people do not like to talk about religion, but on “Some View on the World” we certainly do not shy away from that subject, and we even think it is important to talk about God and commandments.

As on this overview site, we believe it is important to let diverse voices have their say. Therefore, at that view of the world, you can find reports from several newspapers and writers from all kinds of directions or different political movements.

Today, we would like to invite you to feast your eyes on that website too, pay it a visit and (who knows) also subscribe to it to receive free daily news in your mailbox.

A warm welcome!

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Filed under Announcement, Cultural affairs, Ecological affairs, Economical affairs, Educational affairs, Headlines - News, History, Lifestyle, Nature, Political affairs, Questions asked, Religious affairs, Social affairs, Welfare matters, World affairs

Don’t teach your kids to fear the world

All parents want their children to stay safe. But

“teaching [kids] that the world is dangerous is bad for their health, happiness, and success,”

writes Arthur C. Brooks in The Atlantic.

Some research suggests that the perception of the world as a threatening place makes people more suspicious and less tolerant of others, and less inclined to take even moderate risks. People who hold such negative views of life are also less healthy, less satisfied, more depressed, and worse at their jobs than their more positive peers. Plus, teaching kids to fear their surroundings won’t necessarily keep them safe.

A general state of fear can actually make a person less likely to take threats seriously (a self-defense mechanism to control our fear) and undermine precautionary behavior (by degrading the ability to address danger rationally),”

writes Brooks.

[The Atlantic]

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Filed under Being and Feeling, Educational affairs, Health affairs, World affairs

Elizabeths and Charles I-III

England had a Queen Elizabeth queen of England and Ireland, born on Sunday the 7th of September 1533, and, like all the Tudors except Henry VII, at Greenwich Palace, was the only surviving child of Henry VIII by his second queen, Anne Boleyn. With such a mother and with Cranmer as her godfather she represented from her birth the principle of revolt from Rome, but the opponents of that movement attached little importance to her advent into the world. She got the bynames the Virgin Queen and Good Queen Bess,

Although her small kingdom was threatened by grave internal divisions, Elizabeth’s blend of shrewdness, courage, and majestic self-display inspired ardent expressions of loyalty and helped unify the nation against foreign enemies.

Then there was Elizabeth Stuart (1596–1662), consort of Frederick V., elector palatine and titular king of Bohemia, who was the eldest daughter of James I. of Great Britain and of Anne of Denmark, and was born at Falkland Castle in Fifeshire in August 1596. Her brother, the second surviving son of James VI of Scotland and Anne of Denmark was Charles I king of Great Britain and Ireland. In 1620 he took up warmly the cause of his sister the queen of Bohemia, and in 1621 he defended Bacon, using his influence to prevent the chancellor’s degradation from the peerage.

On the 27th of March 1625 Charles I. succeeded to the throne by the death of his father, and on the 1st of May he was married by proxy to Henrietta Maria.

Next we have the Elizabeth who was the UK’s longest-serving monarch and died at Balmoral aged 96, after reigning for 70 years, on Thursday 8, 2022.
The Protestant feelings of the Commons were also aroused by the king’s support of the royal chaplain, Richard Montagu, who had repudiated Calvinistic doctrine. He was a king who managed to rule without parliaments for eleven years, with some success.

He supported zealously William Laud’s rigid Anglican orthodoxy, his compulsory introduction of unwelcome ritual, and his narrow, intolerant and despotic policy, which was marked by several savage prosecutions and sentences in the Star Chamber, drove numbers of moderate Protestants out of the Church into Presbyterianism, and created an intense feeling of hostility to the government throughout the country. Charles I further increased the popular fears on the subject of religion by his welcome given to Panzani, the pope’s agent, in 1634, who endeavoured unsuccessfully to reconcile the two churches, and afterwards to George Conn, papal agent at the court of Henrietta Maria, while the favour shown by the king to these was contrasted with the severe sentences passed upon the Puritans.

He had his war against the Scots and the civil war between Royalists and Parliamentarians.  And after a series of Toyalist defeats Charles surrendered to the Scots in May 1646. The Parliamentarians convicted him of treason and got him beheaded.

11 years after his father Charles I was executed Charles II of Great Britain reigned from 1660-85, after the political turmoil had ended.
No event in the history of England had been attended with more lively and general rejoicing than Charles’s restoration, and none was destined to cause greater subsequent disappointment and disillusion. Indolent, sensual and dissipated by nature, Charles’s vices had greatly increased during his exile abroad, and were now, with the great turn of fortune which gave him full opportunity to indulge them, to surpass all the bounds of decency and control. A long residence till the age of thirty abroad, together with his French blood, had made him politically more of a foreigner than an Englishman, and he returned to England ignorant of the English constitution, a Roman Catholic and a secret adversary of the national religion, and untouched by the sentiment of England’s greatness or of patriotism.

The first period of Charles II.’s reign (1660–1667) was that of the administration of Lord Clarendon, the principal author of the Restoration settlement.

In February 1665 the ill-omened war with Holland was declared, during the progress of which it became apparent how greatly the condition of the national services and the state of administration had deteriorated since the Commonwealth, and to what extent England was isolated and abandoned abroad,

The Dutch War, declared on the 17th of March 1672, though the commercial and naval jealousies of Holland had certainly not disappeared in England, was unpopular because of the alliance with France and the attack upon Protestantism, while the king’s second declaration of indulgence (15th of March 1672) aroused still further antagonism, was declared illegal by the parliament, and was followed up by the Test Act, which obliged James and Clifford to resign their offices. In February 1674 the war with Holland was closed by the treaty of London or of Westminster, though Charles still gave Louis a free hand in his aggressive policy towards the Netherlands, and the Cabal was driven from office. The “Popish Plot,” the creation of a band of impostors encouraged by Shaftesbury and the most violent and unscrupulous of the extreme Protestant party in order to exclude James from the throne, had thrown the whole country into a panic.

In his resistance to the great movement for the exclusion of James from the succession, Charles was aided by moderate men such as Halifax, who desired only a restriction of James’s powers, and still more by the violence of the extreme exclusionists themselves, who headed by Shaftesbury brought about their own downfall and that of their cause by their support of the legitimacy and claims of Charles’s natural son, the duke of Monmouth.

The reign of his predecessor Charles I., and even of that of his successor James II., with their mistaken principles and ideals, have a saving dignity wholly wanting in that of Charles II., and the administration of Cromwell, in spite of the popularity of the restoration, was soon regretted.

“A lazy Prince,”

writes Pepys,

“no Council, no money, no reputation at home or abroad. It is strange how . . . everybody do nowadays reflect upon Oliver and commend him, what brave things he did and made all the neighbour princes fear him; while here a prince, come in with all the love and prayers and good liking of his people . . . hath lost all so soon. . . .

Charles II had no children by his queen, but his numerous mistresses gave him a large illegitimate progeny.

As the wife of King George VI, Elizabeth Angela Marguerite Bowes-Lyon (4 August 1900 – 30 March 2002) was Queen of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth from 11 December 1936 to 6 February 1952. As queen consort, Elizabeth also enjoyed great popularity, enhanced in part by her actions during World War II, when she refused to leave London during German air raids, even after Buckingham Palace was bombed. Many credit her with setting the tone for the modern British monarchy, as she eased formalities and established an unprecedented rapport with the public. She sympathetically was also called the “Queen Mum” and was credited with sustaining the monarchy through numerous crises, including the abdication of Edward VIII and the death of Princess Diana.

On April 21, 1926 Elizabeth Alexandra Mary, the future queen Elizabeth II was born.

Queen Elizabeth II, queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and of her other realms and territories, head of the Commonwealth of Nations, succeeded her father King George VI on February 6 1952 and witnessed enormous social change.

Like other British sovereigns since Edward VII (reigned 1901-10), she assumed an almost entirely symbolic leadership of the British people. From 1951 she had already begun to represent King George VI, whose health was failing, on various occasions.

To the unveiling of a memorial to Queen Mary (consort of King George V) on June 7, 1967, she invited the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, in an attempt to reunite the royal family for the first time since the former King’s abdication in 1936.

We could see how, here and there, she tried to offer the glue to resolve conflicts and fractures.  But her attitude was not always well understood, especially when it came to the domestic problems between her children, with Princess Diana in particular.

It was Lady Diana Frances Spencer daughter of Viscount Althorp (later Earl Spencer), who gave her husband prince Charles two sons, Prince William (1982) who would become next in line after prince Charles, and prince Harry (1984) who is the fifth in the line of succession to the British throne.

The “marriage of the century” was not to last, and Charles and Diana separated in 1992 to be divorced in 1996. She remained highly visible and continued her activities on behalf of numerous charities. A great problem was that the paparazzi could not leave her alone. In 1997 in a chase by sensation reporters, she was killed in a car crash in Paris, along with her companion, Emad Mohamed (Dodi) al-Fayed (1955–97), and their driver. Her death brought on a massive public outpouring of grief.

The car crash seemed for a moment also to create a crash in the monarchy, people not understanding how it could be that a mother and grandmother could stay so apathetic and why it took so much time before the queen appeared to say something good about the beloved princess.

Aberfan disaster, October 1966.jpg

Aberfan in the days immediately after the disaster, showing the extent of the spoil slip

Also in 1966, it was not understood by a lot of Britons why it had taken 8 days before the queen turned up at Aberfan, Wales, where a horrifying coal waste avalanche had killed 144 people, the bulk of them youngsters. The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh visited Aberfan on 29 October to pay their respects to those who had died. Their visit coincided with the end of the main rescue phase; only one contracting firm remained in the village to continue the last stages of the clear-up.

At the place of the tragic event people could see tears running down the queen’s cheeks when she spoke with the survivors. (This expedition to Aberfan was also included in the web series ‘The Crown’.)

In 1992 the public may not have witnessed her tears, but for Queen Elizabeth that was an annus horribilis.
Strangely enough, that terrible year seemed to have loosened something in her that made her appear softer and more ‘root mother-like’ as the years went by. From then onwards it seems that the popularity of the monarchy, which had nearly reached the bottom of the sea, could rise again.

The celebrations of her Silver, Golden, Diamond, and Platinum Jubilees in 1977, 2002, 2012, and 2022, respectively became remarkable occasions where the British people showed how they wanted to show their connection and love for the royals. Up to Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, the Cayman Islands and Gibraltar, as well as in other Commonwealth member-states, like the Gambia, Malaysia, Malta, Pakistan, and Samoa organised also celebrations and showed the four-day Platinum Jubilee Central Weekend from Thursday, 2 June, to Sunday, 5 June, their union with the United Kingdom.

Commemorative stamps and coins were issued by several Commonwealth nations and beacons were lit in every Commonwealth capital for the first time. In many places, trees were planted in the Queen’s honour.

One cannot think of a finer ending than the one offered to this elderly lady who has earned her feathers through thick and thin.

Tributes and messages of congratulations came from leaders all over the world.

Following the platinum jubilee weekend, the Queen released a thank you message in which she said:

When it comes to how to mark seventy years as your Queen, there is no guidebook to follow. It really is a first. But I have been humbled and deeply touched that so many people have taken to the streets to celebrate my platinum jubilee. While I may not have attended every event in person, my heart has been with you all; and I remain committed to serving you to the best of my ability, supported by my family.

At a young age she had already told the public she was willing to serve her country in good and in bad days, as long as she would live; And she did!

On the 8th of September the light went out for her and her oldest son at her bedside took over the role she wanted him and his wife to take.

King Charles III, 73, said the death of his beloved mother was a “moment of great sadness” for him and his family and that her loss would be “deeply felt” around the world.

He also took the chance to both honour “Her Majesty”, “his mommy”. He said

“We mourn profoundly the passing of a cherished sovereign and a much-loved mother.

“I know her loss will be deeply felt throughout the country, the realms and the Commonwealth, and by countless people around the world.”

Now entered a new era, but ,first there would be the coming period of mourning, were he and his family would be

“comforted and sustained by our knowledge of the respect and deep affection in which the Queen was so widely held”.

All the Queen’s children had travelled to Balmoral, near Aberdeen, after doctors placed the Queen under medical supervision. There her grandson and now heir to the throne, Prince William, and his brother, Prince Harry, also gathered. The new king also expressed his love for both Prince Harry and his wife Meghan Markle.

Concerning his mother King Charles he believes she has undertaken now another journey:

“To my darling mama, as you begin your last great journey to join my dear lady. I want simply to say this: ‘Thank you,’”

he said to close his address.

“Your love and devotion to our family and to the family of nations you have served so diligently all these years. May flights of angels sing thee to thy rest.”

 

She may rest in peace!

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  1. A lifelong passion for horses and a Queen’s Platinum Jubilee
  2. A resolute woman who served her country for a very long time
  3. The longest-lived and longest-reigning British monarch is not any-more
  4. Pump, circumstance, Royalism and paganism
  5. Royals, mini busses and environment
  6. 2014 Social contacts
  7. A busy 2017 #3 Fake, gossip and real news
  8. 2019 was #4 a Year of much deceit in Belgium and the rest of Europe
  9. BBC One on Sunday May 29: Never-before-seen footage of Queen Elizabeth II
  10. The week of February the 16th 2022 by The Telegraph
  11. Indy 100 briefing of May 18, 2022: Seeing is believing 
  12. The Telegraph’s Weekly view 2022 June 04 – June 10
  13. The Independent looking at May 26 – June 01
  14. Indy big Stories for 1 Jun 2022
  15. Global Headlines looked at the beginning of June 2022 by Bloomberg
  16. The Independent looking at June 02 – June 08
  17. Blood soaking the water at democracy’s beachhead
  18. The Guardian Headlines for 2022 July 11 -July 17
  19. British MPs did not turn their back on the Prime Minister

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Must-visit British villages easy to appreciate

Good News
Bourton-on-the-hill

Bourton-on-the-hill in Gloucestershire is home to characterful stone cottages and stunning views of the Cotswolds. Credit: Alamy

These must-visit villages are beautiful and also good for our health

Katherine Lovage<br> By Katherine Lovage,
NEWSLETTER EDITOR
Good afternoon,

From cobbled streets to thatched roofs, British villages are easy to appreciate. Lured in by flora, fauna and a peaceful way of life, there’s a reason why so many poets have written rural idylls.

Spending time in the countryside brings health benefits, too. In fact, a recent study showed that being surrounded by nature reduced PMS symptoms and another reported that village life helps the mind stay sharp in old age.

For me, the biggest point-scorer for villages is a silent night, a far cry from my noisy city dwelling. I’ve been woken up by all manner of things in the past year: drunks howling outside my bedroom window, moped accidents on my doorstep and one rather lewd event that it’s best I don’t detail. While I’m sure these things happen in the countryside, I imagine at not quite the same rate…

To discover some of the best spots that Britain has to offer, try scrolling through this feature on Britain’s most desirable villages. I particularly like the look of chocolate-box Beaulieu in Hampshire and Oxwich on the Gower Peninsula. And whether you’re considering a big move or a short break, this list of the most beautiful villages in England is sure to provide some inspiration.

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Drought

Who knows, July and August will be recorded as the warmest and driest months in Europe since records began.

One can only hope that now, with all the fires and other natural disasters that are coming to our regions, there will be a greater awareness that something must be done to combat global warming.

Jewish Young Professional

Photo by Pixabay: https://www.pexels.com/photo/photo-of-brown-bare-tree-on-brown-surface-during-daytime-60013/

Grass grows patchy in bristling brown spikes
(if it grows at all).  The smooth-complexioned 
face of land now cracks 
under unrelenting heat.  Fields once flush
with fruits go barren, pleading

through parched throats and chapped lips 

that no kiss of water
or answered prayer
 
has yet come to soften,

for August doesn’t care 
about religion or rain dances.

***

FOWC, W3, dVerse. I took inspiration from Timothy Price.

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10 Alpine regions that’ll Rock your world this Summer

They say that beauty lies in the eyes of the beholder. But who on earth does not find the mountains a majestic sight?

With the wonderful summer weather warming the rugged yet serene alpine landscapes, now is prime time to leave it all behind and head for the hills.

It may not surprise you to learn that we know our stuff when it comes to alpine regions. Its kind of our forte. We want you to benefit from our mountains of experience. So scroll down!

 Here are 10 alpine regions that’ll rock your world this summer:

1. MONTAFON

Bestof-Outdooractive-Montafon

The Montafon valley in Vorarlberg stretches almost 40km and is overlooked by some monumental mountain peaks. Discover three extraordinary mountain ranges Verwall, Rätikon and Silvretta. Explore the vast network of hiking and biking trails and visit the world famous Piz Buin (3312m) the highest peak in the Montafon valley.

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2. VALLE D’AOSTA

Bestof-Outdooractive-Aostatal

This Italian jewel borders Switzerland and France, and displays distinct influences from all three countries. The Dora Baltea river runs through the main valley and the giants Mont Blanc, Matterhorn and Monte Rosa rise up into the sky in dominant fashion. Enjoy the magnificent panoramic views and the extraordinary routes between Italy and France.

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3.LAKE LUCERNE

Bestof-Outdooractive-Vierwaldstättersee

Enclosed by the spectacular regions Lucerne, Unterwalden, Schwyz and Uri, Lake Lucerne is one of the most spectacular destinations in Switzerland. In addition to the idyllic resorts of Weggis and Vitznau, the surrounding mountains offer wonderful opportunity for exploration!

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Bestof-Outdooractive-Kawendel

4. KARWENDEL 

Karwendel in Tyrol and Bavaria makes for a truly magnificent holiday destination. Experience vibrant, blooming meadows, rugged mountain peaks, rushing streams and fresh alpine air.

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Bestof-Outdooractive-Gap Tallard Vallées

5. HAUTE MAURIENNE VANOISE

The upper Maurienne valley is a wonderful destination for hiking and mountain biking. With a staggeringly beautiful backdrop, enjoy delicious local specialities including some of the worlds finest cheese!

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6. HOCHKOENIG

Stunningly beautiful with a huge range of epic mountain views. Find some wonderful areas to explore including Maria Alm, Diente and the extraoridnary Mühlbach.

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Bestof-Outdooractive-Viamala

7. VIAMALA

Host to some superb hiking and biking trails. Follow routes through gorges and valleys, over high mountain peaks and across extraordinary landscapes. Discover some of the finest panoramic views and jaw-dropping mountain lakes.

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Bestof-Outdooractive-Bled

8. BLED 

Located in the Slovenian alps, experience the spectacle of the truly majestic Lake Bled with an impressive backdrop of the Julian Alps.

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Bestof-Outdooractive-Dolomiten

9. THE DOLOMITES

Almost no introduction needed! The Dolomites are a wonderfully diverse, and histrionically rich place. Visit ancient castles and historic sites, as you experience some of Europe’s greatest mountains.

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Bestof-Outdooractive-Ötztal

10. OETZTAL 

The landscape of the Tyrolean Alpine Valley is a truly impressive sight. With so many hospitality huts and cabins, you’ll never be stuck without a supply of delicious local cheese and beer to accompany your adventures!

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Sun-kissed evolution

This summer, in several places in our village, we see several fields full of showy sunflowers, which give an inviting gesture from the hills and make the sun shine even more in our hearts.

ChinHooi Ng's Poetic Notes

A sun-loving flower

blooms within sunburst

receiving the gift and bounty

from the gentle nature

sun-blessed petals

bathing far away from the abyss

the gloom and fear

yet the truth is

rooted in the soil and dirt

born of the wind and rain

growth and development

is always accompanied by

daily cloudiness and radiance

and flowering is

but a fleeting ceremony

storms and thunder are the medal

to flaunt

little did i know

i already have my plot

of sun-loving flowers

flowers that have been sharpened

by the wildness of weather

darkness and cold are not enemy

but friends

squall and lava

are origins

sun-loving flowers

will always be able

to shine through the bolts

of lightning

dance through the vehemence

of cyclone

and flow high above

the molten rocks.

©2022, ChinHooi Ng.

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Looking at New York anno 2022

One black man, a vendor selling fridge magnets and other gadgets,
was a US army veteran who served in Vietnam. He looked twenty years younger than his actual age of seventy-two.

Born and bred in New York, a 72 year old Vietnam veteran told one of our members how they are trying to push his people out of the area with exorbitant costs for rent and how they are trying to charge people for crossing from Queens into Manhattan as a method of keeping the poor from that area.

“This is my state, and I was born and bred here,”

he said with passion.

Everywhere you go in New York there are all types of security people, armed to the teeth, which gives an uneasy fear to your mental being. You wonder what type of night they had before their work started. Are they annoyed about debt? Have they anger issues as they stroll the streets? Inside museums or exhibitions there are security people everywhere.

One of our members noticed:

The subway is a disgusting place to go to. There are no access facilities for people with disabilities. Each station stinks of urine and is dank and run down.

Customer information is deplorable. It reminded me of the London underground in the early 80s. On the streets at night rubbish bags are left piling up, and the bags are left everywhere.

I witnessed one black person lying on a pavement as hundreds walked by, just as a matter of course. People begging everywhere you go, some with limbs missing, others with that gaunt look on them. Food is very expensive, which is hard to understand, given the massive agriculture sector in the United States.

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Yulia Tymoshenko: We are in World War Three already

Ms Tymoshenko, who is the first and so far only woman to serve as prime minister of Ukraine, said:

“We are in World War Three already,
as there are now 50 countries behind Ukraine.
We need more weapons
to ensure that we crush the Russian army on Ukrainian territory.
That will be the end of Putin’s regime,
because the Russian people will not tolerate such a defeat.”

 

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America’s current belief system has eroded her foundation


”Just as water rapidly eroded the banks of the mighty Colorado River
and created a vast Grand Canyon,
America’s current belief system (relativism) has eroded her foundation and created a moral void.
~ Shane Idleman in America Needs to Turn Back to God.”

 

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Is the Russian military superior to any other European nation?

Icon for on Diplomacy & Warfare

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Feminism not about making women stronger


Feminism isn’t about making women stronger.
Women are already strong.
It’s about changing the way the world perceives that strength.’
– G.D. Anderson

 

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What’s a historical fact that would shock most people to find out?: Rape of Nanking

The horrific events are known as the Nanking Massacre or the Rape of Nanking, as estimated that 20,000 women including some children and the elder were raped during the occupation.

A large number of rapes were done systematically by the Japanese soldiers as they went from door to door searching for girls and many women being captured and gang raped.The women were often killed immediately after being raped.

The Japanese were infuriated by the strength of Chinese resistance and when China’s Nationalist capital Nanking fell in December 1937, Japanese troops immediately slaughtered thousands of Chinese soldiers who had surrendered to them. The Japanese then rounded up about twenty thousand young Chinese men and transported them in trucks outside the city walls where they were killed in a massive slaughter. Japanese troops were then encouraged by their officers to loot Nanking and slaughter and rape the Chinese population of the city.

For six weeks, life for the Chinese in Nanking became a nightmare. Bands of drunken Japanese soldiers roamed the city, murdering, raping, looting, and burning at whim. Chinese civilians who were stopped on the street and found to possess nothing of value were immediately killed.During this period, soldiers of the Imperial Japanese Army murdered Chinese civilians and disarmed combatants who numbered an estimated 40,000 to over 300,000.

The bodies of thousands of victims of the slaughter were dumped into the Yangtze River until the river was red with their blood. After looting Nanking of anything of value the Japanese started fires that gutted one third of the city.

Subal Das

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In March of 1945 the Japanese Army did the same thing at Manila in the Philippines. It is estimated that at least 100,000 civilians were murdered.

Japanese General Yamishita was tried and executed for these war crimes. Gang rapes were also wide spread.

These victims were murdered in the Manila Hospital.

Darrell Stanley

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British MPs did not turn their back on the Prime Minister

One can wonder how long politicians shall accept certain behaviour of the leader of their party.

We remember the quote of the day 2022 May 24

“Any reasonable person looking at some of these photos will only be able to conclude that the PM obviously lied to the Commons, and possibly to the cops, and there is no reasonable story for how others were fined for event X but not him.”

–  Photos will show that Boris Johnson “obviously lied” to police and the House of Commons about Downing Street parties, the PM’s former top aide Dominic Cummings has claimed, hours before several photos of the PM at a No 10 gathering leaked.

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The whole thing is rotten. He’s got to go.”

–  An MP who is considering submitting a letter to the chair of the backbench 1922 Committee over Boris Johnson speaks to The Independent about Partygate.

It seems like the majority of the conservative politicians do not want to see and hear how the general British public has two-thirds (66 per cent) of voters who believe Mr Johnson should resign. The findings by an exclusive Savanta poll for The Independent you would expect would have troubled anxious Conservative MPs, though before the ‘vote de confiance’ more than a quarter (26 per cent) of those who backed the Tories in 2019 said they were less likely to do so again if Mr Johnson remains leader, and at the confidence vote the votes were mostly in favour of that man who could lie so much and demand things from people to what he himself did not keep.

Looking at the past:

Fed up with the anger of their constituents over partygate, we had the impression there would now, after so many debacles, be enough MPs demanding and taking care that Mr Johnson should leave No 10 because he has dragged the party and Government through the mud by misleading Parliament and by making the British people like fools or idiots one can play with.

For Johnson, the press is the guilty one of the state the UK is in. Boris Johnson’s had presented a 907-word plea for support to MPs, in which he suggests that the press were somehow to blame for the predicament that the Prime Minister now finds himself in.

Suggesting that colleagues had been “focusing on Westminster politics” to the detriment of voters, the former Telegraph journalist argued that “some of the criticism has perhaps been fair, some less so”.

Four out of the six Scottish Tories have turned against Mr Johnson because they feel the party’s weak performance north of the border has been worsened by his leadership, and in an attempt to drive a wedge between Scottish and English Conservatives, they have called for him to go.

When they voted, we can wonder if they had seen and heard the reaction of the people at the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee. As polling guru Prof Sir John Curtice pointed out, the Tories’ biggest problem is that the public does not trust the Prime Minister.

“… what people say to camera and the boos that you hear at the Prime Minister outside St Paul’s Cathedral. They’re not necessarily representative, but they are iconic of a mood that is very intuitive.”

After winning yesterday’s confidence vote the prime minister was as it happens more, in bullish form, and said it was time to focus on issues the public cares about – and not what he characterised as the whims of his “opponents”.

Unlike previous rebellions against No 10, Monday’s vote is not thought to have been an organised campaign with a sophisticated “shadow whipping” operation. With 148 MPs voting against their leader the Tory Whips faced a far larger rebellion than expected.

For: 211; Against: 148 which gives 59% for the minister to stay on his post and 41% wanting him to leave.

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The World standing on three things – according to Simeon the Just

The Jewish High Priest during the Second Temple period, Simeon the Just also termed “the Righteous” because of the piety of his life and his benevolence toward his compatriots, was deeply interested in the spiritual and material development of the nation.

As a high priest of the Great Synagogue he used to say:

“The world exists through three things: the Law, Service (Temple sacrifice, and today prayer), and acts of loving kindness.”

We live in this world and do have to live with it. To guide us through life in this world, the divine Creator has given us His Word and His Law, or Torah.

Torah signifies divine revelation; either the fact of communion between God and man, or the wisdom so imparted. Though to Israel alone the Torah was given, yet Israel in this was representative of humanity. Intercourse between God and man is fundamental, and without it human life above the merely animal stage would be impossible.

The service; this is the service in the temple, regarded as the worship of God in the manner appointed by him. If one special element in the service be intended, that may be the sacrifices, as a symbol of obedience to the divine commands, or the priesthood as the appointed agency for performing the service.

Maimonides interprets the word in the former sense, and this lends itself better to generalisation. ‘Deeds of kindness’, denote unselfish beneficence in the fullest measure, to cover any good that one person can do to another.

The ‘three things’ which are declared to be fundamental in human life are thus found to be Revelation, obedience to God, and brotherly love. It is possible however that the second term ‘the service’ was intended to symbolise worship as a fundamental in human life, including in its meaning both obedience to divine precepts, and the functions of consecrated ministers. The saying is only true when thus generalised; but it would be hard to say how much of that more general meaning was present to the mind of Simeon when he uttered it.

~ Pirke Aboth, Sayings of the Fathers, 1:2 (Herford)

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