Tag Archives: Cancer

Cancer and Life Lessons

People often forget how they have much more in them than they would think at first. Not only could they find the power in themselves to help themselves and fasten the healing process by taking on the right mind, they also can help others by sharing what they feel and how they went on to battle the disease which got to them.

It is nice to find people on the net who are wiling to share their quest in life and their adventure with what bothered their body and mind.
By sharing the many thoughts and providing information where to find more people can help each other and give better chance to each other, finding solution which perhaps can help them on their way to an acceptable life.

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Remember: Giving opportunities:

  1. Cancer by no means only life experience that forces you to face in a concrete way the reality that there will in fact be an end to your life someday
  2. Cancer does not need to be the end
  3. Experience the hard teacher
  4. reassess what’s important in life
  5. reflect back on own experience
  6. are not afraid to come to know how to cope, how to get help, and so forth
  7. learn valuable life lessons from each experience
  8. learn how to adapt to changed capabilities
  9. inform yourself
  10. set off in exciting new directions
  11. continue to do what is important
  12. keep on dreaming
  13. reach out for the help and support that you need
  14. decide on a treatment plan with doctors
  15. cope with fear of losing control
  16. be aware that time really is precious and we need to choose very carefully how we spend it
  17. make sure that you do the things that matter most to you
  18. help others by sharing our stories and experiences
  19. contribute by willing to share your thoughts and life lessons
  20. understand how factors in our external environment interact with inherited mutations or other susceptibilities to lead to cancer
  21. learn how to stop the disease process – to prevent it or to intervene effectively when it does start.

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  • People Celebrate Kicking Cancer’s Butt (wsaw.com)
    Cancer is an awful, life-threatening disease, so when someone beats it, there’s reason to celebrate. That’s exactly what many people did Monday on National Cancer Survivor’s Day.

    Barb Rebstock is one of them. She started her battle with breast cancer three years ago. Her mother and sister both had breast cancer, and her mother also got lung cancer too. Both women lost their lives to the disease. Upon diagnosis, Rebstock had 38 rounds of radiation that she said were not easy. Although she’s still going through other treatment now, she said her screenings have been clear.

    “Everybody out there that has cancer, don’t give up,” she said. “Just keep going, keep fighting it. Listen to the doctors and don’t give up. Half the battle is your attitude.”

  • New Targeted Therapies Show Promise In Fighting Aggressive Cancers (publichealthwatch.wordpress.com)
    Several new targeted therapies have shown promise against advanced cancers of the blood, lungs, ovaries, and thyroid, according to research released Saturday at a major US cancer research conference.

    Among them is an oral drug called ibrutinib, made by Pharmacyclics. It was found to be “highly active” against chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and extended survival in some patients whose cancers did not respond to the standard treatment, chemotherapy.

  • ‘Cows’ milk is good for calves, but not for us’: Avoid cancer by axing dairy, meat products, U.K. scientist and six-time survivor urges (news.nationalpost.com)
    In 1993, the breast cancer that had plagued Jane Plant since 1987 returned for the fifth time. It came in the shape of a secondary tumour — a lump in her neck the size of half a boiled egg.

    Doctors told her that she had only months to live.

    Then a mother of two young children, Plant recalls the shocked discussion she had with her husband, Peter. As scientists — she is a geochemist, he a geologist — they had both worked in China on environmental issues, and knew that Chinese women had historically very low rates of breast cancer: one epidemiological study from the ’70s showed the disease affected one in 100,000 Chinese women, compared with one in 12 in the West.

    “I had checked this information with senior academics,” Plant says. “Chinese doctors I knew told me they had hardly seen a case of breast cancer in years. Yet if Chinese women are on Western diets — if they go to live in the U.S. or Australia, for example — within one generation they got the same rate. I said to Peter, ’Why is it that Chinese women living in China don’t get breast cancer?’ “

  • High protein diet linked to spiked cancer risk akin to smoking 20 cigarettes a day: U.S. study

    Eating too much protein could be as dangerous as smoking for middle-aged people, a study has found.
    Research which tracked thousands of adults for nearly 20 years found that those who eat a diet rich in animal protein are four times more likely to die of cancer than someone with a low-protein diet.

    The risk is nearly as high as the danger of developing cancer from smoking 20 cigarettes each day.

    Previous studies have shown a link between cancer and red meat, but it is the first time research has measured the risk of death associated with regularly eating too much protein.

    Nutritional advice has traditionally focused on cutting down on fat, sugar and salt. The World Health Organization announced a consultation Wednesday suggesting that guidelines on sugar consumption should be lowered, but there have been few warnings about excess protein.

    Read more…

  • Doctors worry cancer terminology contributes to overtreatment (triblive.com)

    If Dr. Steve Shapiro had his way, some cancers wouldn’t even be called cancer.

    “The word cancer just scares people to death. It’s expensive and it weighs on people’s minds, both the patient and the doctor,” said Shapiro, chief scientific officer at UPMC and a lung cancer expert.

    What’s troubling, Shapiro and other experts say, is that the word often is used for lesions so tiny or insignificant, they might never develop into an illness that would cause harm. They say this leads to unnecessary treatments such as chemotherapy, radiation and surgery to remove tumors that could go away on their own.

    To avoid this, a panel of experts advising the National Cancer Institute is urging the medical community to reconsider use of the word. In a May article published in The Lancet, the experts suggest renaming some pre-cancerous lesions and tailoring screening to individual patients.

    “The medical community, just like the public, thinks if you hear the word cancer, it’s something you’re going to die of, unless you treat it and treat it aggressively, whereas there’s a whole spectrum of disease, and it can be low-risk and it can be high-risk,” Dr. Laura Esserman, the study’s lead author and a breast surgeon at University of California San Francisco, told the Tribune-Review.

    “Maybe part of the solution is to take these low-risk things and rename them and move them out of that category of things that we have a visceral response to.”

  • Cancer Messed With the Wrong B*tch: Hey, Hey, We’re the Metsters (wonderfultips.wordpress.com)
    A lot of people out there hear the words breast cancer and think that’s it. That the breast cancer you have, is the same one I have, and the same one your mom had, and the same one your fish had, etc. But that couldn’t be farther from the truth. There are many subtypes of breast cancer (such as inflammatory breast cancer, and triple negative breast cancer), and the different subtypes respond differently to treatments. There are also different stages of breast cancer.
  • Smoking and cancer gene ‘deadly mix’ (bbc.co.uk)
    The research, published in the journal Nature, found the gene could double the likelihood of getting lung cancer.

    And some men and women faced a far greater risk, a team at the Institute of Cancer Research in London said.

    Cancer Research UK suggested drugs targeted at breast cancer may work in some lung cancers.

    The links between variants of the BRCA genes and breast cancer are well established – a diagnosis led Hollywood actress Angelina Jolie to have a preventative double mastectomy – but it has also been linked with an increased risk of other cancers affecting women such as ovarian cancer and prostate cancer in men.

  • Cancer Lesson #46: What to Wear on a No Hair Day (kabcancerlessons.wordpress.com)
    It’s important to remember wigs, scarves and hats can offer protection for self-confidence by dented hair loss. In this post, I present options – some serious, some not –for anyone forced to deal with those dreaded no-hair days.
  • Friend With a Brain Tumor? (everydayleft.com)
    Do you have a friend with a brain tumor? Do you have friends who have friends with a brain tumor? Do you have a family member, perhaps a distant cousin with a brain tumor? How about some random acquaintance at work, does he/she have a brain tumor? Does a close family member have a brain tumor? Do you have a brain tumor?

    Every body knows someone who has or had cancer of some kind in other parts of their bodies – there are really too many out there. But chances are you know someone who’s experienced living with a brain tumor – primary or secondary. You may have known someone who died from brain cancer. Maybe you just heard about someone who was diagnosed with a brain tumor, but you really don’t understand what that means.

  • A personal note: The mirage of the “magic bullet” for cancer – and a better alternative (stage4living.wordpress.com)
    One thing I’ve found interesting is that there was less interest than I expected in nutritional measures that people can adopt in helping manage their illness. More people are interested in finding the “magic bullet” for cancer. The magic bullet is the one pill, drug, potion, food, or drink that will magically dissolve the tumor and metastasized cancer cells and allow the patient to continue with the same diet, lifestyle, mental state and other factors that contributed to causing the cancer in the first place.
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    In some cases radical lifestyle and dietary changes have actually resulted in late stage remission of diseases; for example the over one thousand such cases documented in medical journals and written about in Radical Remission by Dr. Kelly A. Turner (see my review in an earlier post below). And Dr. Turner believes that for every documented case of “Radical Remission” there are probably over a hundred cases that are never documented. In some cases radical lifestyle and diet changes may result in a few extra months, a year, three years, five years or more of “bonus time” versus just using conventional treatment alone.
  • Teen fighting cancer surprised by Suns gorilla, dancers, friends on eve of surgery (azfamily.com)
    At only 16 years old, Cody Hatch is battling a rare form of cancer called metastatic paraganglioma. He has a series of tumors that have a tight grip on his spine.”I’m hoping it’ll recover faster and I haven’t been too worried, I’m just trying to be optimistic about it,” Cody said Monday, just a day before undergoing surgery.
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New Immunotherapy Drug Data Show Promise in Treating Cancer

Cell based Immunotherapies are proven to be effective for some cancers. Immune effector cells such as lymphocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, natural killer cells (NK Cell), cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), etc., work together to defend the body against cancer by targeting abnormal antigens expressed on the surface of the tumor due to mutation. {Immunotherapy – Wikipedia article}

A research campus operated by Bristol-Myers Sq...

A research campus operated by Bristol-Myers Squibb in Princeton, New Jersey. Photographed by user Coolcaesar on September 2, 2007. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Patients with the skin cancer melanoma who received a combination of two Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. BMY -1.31% immunotherapies in a clinical trial lived an average of more than three years. In another study, about 70% of advanced melanoma patients receiving a Merck MRK +0.12% & Co. immunotherapy were still alive after one year of treatment.
Doctors say the outcomes were impressive because until recently, most patients with advanced melanoma could be expected to live for less than a year.

These findings and others were being presented Monday at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology add to growing enthusiasm among cancer doctors that immunotherapies could usher in a major advance in treatment not just for melanoma, but also for a range of cancers including those of the lung, bladder and kidney.

For many cancer patients it will be nice to hear that in the last decade the field of immunotherapy has exploded.

New research on innovative immunotherapies for advanced or high-risk melanoma and cervical cancer were presented today at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).  These treatments – used alone or in combination – fight cancer by activating and amplifying the body’s immune response to the disease.

The new studies find high activity with investigative drugs for advanced melanoma, and show for the first time that ipilimumab, a treatment already approved for advanced melanoma, can substantially decrease the risk of melanoma recurrence in certain patients with earlier-stage disease.  In addition, another small trial reports that a one-time, personalized immunotherapy treatment induces complete and long-lasting remissions in a small number of women with advanced cervical cancer – a disease with little to no effective treatment options.

“The field of immunotherapy has exploded in the last decade, and more and more patients are benefiting,” said press briefing moderator Steven O’Day, MD, ASCO expert and clinical associate professor of medicine at the University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine.

“Having a potential new way to keep melanoma at bay is a major advance for patients who live under the constant fear of recurrence after surgery. It’s also incredibly exciting that we’re extending the benefits of immunotherapy beyond melanoma, to diseases like cervical cancer where patients urgently need better options.”

Featured studies include:

  •  Adjuvant ipilimumab improves recurrence-free survival in patients with high-risk stage III melanoma: Study marks the first time adjuvant (post-surgery) ipilimumab is shown to be effective in earlier-stage melanoma, though side effects are considerable. 
  • PD-1 targeting immunotherapy MK-3475 has high and long-lasting activity against metastatic melanoma: Large phase I trial finds high survival rates in patients with advanced melanoma, including those previously treated with ipilimumab; one-year survival rate is 69 percent across all patient subgroups.
  • Combination immunotherapy with ipilimumab and nivolumab achieves long-term survival for patients with advanced melanoma: Updated follow-up data from an expanded phase I study show concurrent treatment with ipilimumab and the anti-PD-1 nivolumab yields strong, long-lasting responses and high survival rates.
  • T helper cell function

    T helper cell function (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

    HPV-targeted adoptive T cell therapy may provide a new personalized strategy for advanced cervical cancer: Early study of HPV-targeted immunotherapy shows promising activity in metastatic cervical cancer, a hard-to-treat disease with few effective treatment options.

Media Resources:

  • Online Annual Meeting Media Resource Center: Visit www.asco.org/AMMRC for press releases, press briefing recordings, the press briefing schedule at-a-glance, embargo policies, high-resolution photos, print-friendly downloads, and the Virtual Press Room, an online repository of corporate and institutional press releases from third-party organizations. 
  • CancerProgress.Net: The home of ASCO’s 50th Anniversary and a timeline detailing the progress made against 18 of the most common cancers.

Cancer.Net: ASCO’s cancer information website, providing doctor-approved information on more than 120 cancer types.

  • Long-term results encouraging for combination immunotherapy for advanced melanoma (medicalxpress.com)
    The first long-term follow-up results from a phase 1b immunotherapy trial combining drugs for advanced melanoma patients has shown encouraging results—long-lasting with high survival rates—researchers report. First author Mario Sznol, M.D., professor of medical oncology at Yale Cancer Center, is presenting the updated data at the 2014 annual conference of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in Chicago.Sznol, clinical research leader of the melanoma research program at Yale Cancer Center, was the senior author on the original study of combination immunotherapy that was first published in the New England Journal of Medicine and presented at ASCO in 2013. Jedd Wolchok, M.D., of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center was first author of the earlier study, and senior author of this updated research.
  • Scientists Prime The Immune System As A Powerful Cancer Weapon (forbes.com)
    Early results showing that genetically modified white blood cells, called T-cells, can make cancer cells disappear, at least temporarily, in 50% to 90% of patients with certain blood cancers that have failed all other treatments have ignited a land grab among drug companies. But until now it’s been uncertain whether the immune system could be weaponized against solid tumors like those in breast, lung, and cervical cancer. Some doubted that the cells could make it into these cancers, which literally build walls of flesh and blood to protect themselves.
  • ‘Miracle’ drug for cancer treatment (belfasttelegraph.co.uk)
    The drug, pembrolizumab, is the latest in a new generation of treatments that prevent cancers shielding themselves from the immune system.It was tested on melanoma – the most dangerous form of skin cancer – because the prospects for patients with advanced forms of this disease are so bleak.Just under 70% of the 411 patients taking part in the trial were still alive one year after starting on the treatment.

    The result is considered remarkable because all had highly advanced melanoma and a very poor prognosis.

  • Doctors use immune therapy against cervical cancer (host.madison.com)
    Many private companies are pursuing other treatments that are given like drugs aimed at the immune system. Also discussed at the American Society of Clinical Oncology conference:—Bristol-Myers Squibb Co.’s Yervoy, the first immune therapy to improve survival of advanced, inoperable melanoma, also helped prevent recurrence when given to people with earlier stage disease at regular intervals after surgery, a study of nearly 1,000 patients found. But severe side effects caused half to quit treatment, and five people died from it. Doctors think a lower dose might minimize these problems. The drug also costs more than $100,000 for initial treatment, so long-term cost is a concern.—Nivolumab, an experimental therapy from Bristol-Myers, extended survival by 3 1/2 years on average when given with Yervoy to people with very advanced melanoma, far better than any previous treatments. Nine of 53 patients treated had complete remissions.

    —Merck & Co.’s experimental therapy pembrolizumab gave one-year survival rates of about 69 percent in a study of 411 patients with very advanced melanoma, including many previously treated with Yervoy.

    —Genentech’s experimental immune therapy for bladder cancer shrank tumors in 13 of 30 patients with advanced bladder cancer for which there are hardly any treatment options now. All signs of cancer disappeared in two patients.

    Immune therapy struggled for years with just occasional small gains, but “now we have cruise missiles” giving better kill rates against many tumor types, said Dr. Steven O’Day of the University of Southern California.

    Others tempered their enthusiasm, noting that some promising approaches produced more limited gains once they were more fully researched.

  • Immune therapies improve treatment of cancers (usatoday.com)
    A half dozen experimental trials presented at the ongoing American Society of Clinical Oncology conference in Chicago show that researchers are finally making significant progress in both melanoma where therapies began, as well as in other cancers.”The revolution is here, it’s ongoing and it’s bursting out of melanoma into solid tumors,” said Steven O’Day, a melanoma specialist in Beverly Hills, Calif., who helped run a Monday morning news conference. “This meeting is evidence of further progress in melanoma and in other very difficult to treat solid cancers.”
  • Cancer Research Institute Launches TheAnswerToCancer.org, a Website for Cancer Patients and Caregivers (socialmediaportal.com)
    The Cancer Research Institute (CRI) is proud to announce the launch of a first-of-its-kind website devoted to cancer immunotherapy, also called immuno-oncology, designed specifically for cancer patients and their caregivers, TheAnswerToCancer.org.”As major advances in cancer immunotherapy begin to alter the landscape of cancer treatment, patients facing a cancer diagnosis need to be aware of immunotherapy as a potential treatment option for them,” said Jill O’Donnell-Tormey, Ph.D., CEO and director of scientific affairs at the Cancer Research Institute. “Our new website, TheAnswerToCancer.org, informs patients about these new treatments, and encourages them to talk with their doctors about immunotherapy.”Through TheAnswerToCancer.org, CRI seeks to engage, educate, and empower patients and their loved ones to learn more about cancer immunotherapy as a treatment option across numerous tumor types. The site provides a robust but accessible overview of the science behind cancer immunotherapy, detailed information about cancer immunotherapy clinical trials, and voices from the cancer immunotherapy community.
  • Doctors use immunotherapy against cervical cancer (sfgate.com)
    Two years ago, Arrica Wallace was riddled with tumors from widely spread cervical cancer that the strongest chemotherapy and radiation could not beat back. Today, the Kansas mother shows no signs of the disease, and it was her own immune system that made it go away.The experimental approach that helped her is one of the newest frontiers in the rapidly advancing field of cancer immunotherapy, which boosts the body’s natural ways of attacking tumors.
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    Among those discussed at the American Society of Clinical Oncology conference was an experimental therapy from Genentech that shrank tumors in 13 of 30 patients with advanced bladder cancer, for which there are hardly any treatment options now. All signs of cancer disappeared in two patients.
  • Immunotherapy an Effective Tool in Fighting Cervical Cancer (modvive.com)
    Aarica Wallace of Manhattan, Kansas spoke with The Associated Press about the cervical cancer that almost took her life. Wallace was 35 when her cervical cancer was discovered, and spreading widely, with one tumor was so large it blocked half of her windpipe. Given less than a year to live, and with two young sons, Wallace didn’t give up hope. ”It’s been 22 months since treatment and 17 months of completely clean scans” showing no sign of cancer, Wallace told the Associated Press.
  • New ‘immunotherapy’ treatments show dramatic progress in fight against cervical cancer (rawstory.com)
    The idea behind HPV-targeted adoptive T-cell therapy is to boost the body’s immune response to HPV in the tumors.
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    The technique is still a long way from becoming everyday practice in medicine, and researchers have yet to figure out why it works in some but not in others.“With the refinement of adoptive T-cell therapy and reduction of potential significant side effects, this can offer hope for improvement of survival for patients with advanced cervical cancers,” said Linus Chang, professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Chang was not involved in the study.Cervical cancer infects some 530,000 women each year and kills more than 270,000 around the globe, with most deaths occurring in the developing world, according to the World Health Organization.

    Despite the rapid and complete responses that two of his patients have seen, Hinrichs said it is far too early to declare them cured.

    But Wallace said she does not care about the terminology.

    “You can’t argue with the scans,” she told AFP.

    “It’s not there and I feel good. I don’t have to hear the word ‘cure.’”

  • Immunotherapy Drug Data Show Promise in Treating Cancer (live.wsj.com) Video
    Drugs designed to unleash the body’s own immune system against cancer are significantly prolonging the lives of some people with hard-to-treat forms of the deadly disease. WSJ’s Jeanne Whalen joins Tanya Rivero on Lunch Break to explain.

 

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Denis Wright looking at the world of human beings

Many people do not see that our life is something which is given to us, by a ‘Thing‘ bigger than we can understand or would ever be able to grasp. It is a Spirit which created everything and still allows things to be created. For the beings which can walk around on this earth they may be a fleeting thing.

“whether you reach one year of age, or ten or a hundred years”

knew also terminal cancer patient Denis Wright. He wrote on his blog, which was selected for preservation by the Australian National Library in its Pandora Archive:

Every life is a little spark that flickers briefly, sometimes brightly, and then the spark fades quickly and passes back into an infinity of space and silence. {A Last Message from Denis}

The former historian in Asian studies, comparative religions, movie-maker and “observer of the world as we have changed it” was dealing with a GBM (4) (glioblastoma multiforme): the most aggressive form of brain tumour.

Denis Wright wasn’t meant to live long. He’s had birthdays – 66 of them – but he’s also had plenty of deathdays – the dates he thought he would “cark it”.

At one point the historian from Armidale in country NSW said:

“Every date we’ve estimated so far has been wrong … I’ve embarrassed myself by staying alive.” {A Last Message from Denis}

While he was living on this earth for this brief time he was fully aware that

our bodies are the bearers of who and what we are. They are not us; they’re just the vessels in which our true self resides. We stop sometimes, and try to take stock. We move on, and simply live. We occasionally contemplate the great questions or put them aside as an insoluble puzzle. {A Last Message from Denis}

Mr Wright has not wasted his time by moaning and shutting himself out of this world where there is much suffering. He himself suffered also much, but he wanted to use his pains and agonies to help others. That is the good attitude we should like to see by many more.

On a blog, called My Unwelcome Stranger  he took the courage to write about his experiences. Writing about his troubled health he shared why he would rather call someone than send them a text (it’s too slow to say anything other than “OK”)

But why put myself through 10 minutes of torment on a screen I can’t read anyway when I can just press one button to bring up the number of the person I want to call, and say, “OK”? I could even add, “I love you” in a real voice, as long as I got the right number. What to would be bemused, but not amused, should I leave a voice message for him telling him so when I really thought I was phoning my beloved. {A Last Message from Denis}

Often people let themselves go and in their illness they do not seem to think clear or forget the easy things they could do. though when suffering the toll can be high and people can miss the true importance of small things and worse, of bigger things like a wedding (and that is “the receipt of as many and as expensive a range of gifts as possible,” he joked).

For reasons I still can’t quite figure out in view of the fact that we were going for the record for the longest engagement in history, one which had begun almost last century (millennium even), we abandoned that exercise after a sterling effort of nearly a decade, and opted to get married instead. {A Last Message from Denis}

The last fourteen years of his life he has spent with, and been loved by, and married the one who is to him

the most beautiful, intelligent and caring woman in the world. It’s impossible for me to express the amount of care and time and patience Tracey has given me, with little thought to her own needs. She has always placed mine first. This path we’ve had to share since 2009 has been more difficult than anyone can understand unless you’ve travelled a similar one – and cared as much as she has. She hid her tears from me many times, knowing how much they tore me apart; yet to cry alone and out of sight is one of the saddest things in life. {A Last Message from Denis}

For every person on this earth it is so important who can be around him or her. The close surroundings are the one part of our life we should assure a good connection. It is in those surroundings that people should be able to build up some trust with others and feel the connection with others. It is also in the close surroundings people should be able to come to understand the meaning of love through the presence in their life by others.

It is nice to hear that Dennis Wright could clung himself to life to the end. He wrote:

it’s only because of the joy of sharing life with close family and friends, and my desire to be with them as long as possible. For me, nothing else mattered but those bonds of love and friendship. To allow them to slip away is, by far, the most difficult thing to accept. {A Last Message from Denis}

All of us should find ways to help others around us. We should bring our friendship out of our boundaries and go into our neighbourhood having an eye and a heart for those in need.

When we ourselves have some bad moments let us also remember it is necessary to go looking for a balance heavily in favour of good things over bad in our life. Sometimes we shall have to take time to chose the way of relativism for certain things which happened in our life.

I’m also grateful that I had the chance to reflect on my life and its meaning through the window of terminal illness. That time for reflection isn’t something everyone gets. It’s a window through which things become sharper and more vivid than any other. {A Last Message from Denis}

Let us all learn from the lesson Mr Wright gave:

Whatever endures beyond my body will do so, especially in the form of the consequences of my actions in life, and my only wish is that whatever I’ve taken from the world, I have been able to give something meaningful back. {A Last Message from Denis}

That we may find joy in having been able to give something meaningful back.

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Useful other readings:

  1. Created to live in relation with God
  2. Cancerous Black Holes
  3. Mourners Celebrate Life Of Inspirational Cancer Teen
The Waiting Room / Breast Cancer Tableau

The Waiting Room / Breast Cancer Tableau (Photo credit: Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library)

  • numerology for Denis Wright (newsnumerology.com)
    Dr Charlie Teo, high-profile Australian neurosurgeon, has said the condition is “impossible” to cure.
  • ‘Exploding’ Cells? Swedish Scientists Discover Potential Cancer Treatment for Glioblastoma Multiforme – The Karolinska Institute in Stockholm reverses cancerous cell growth with Vacquinol-1. (sevenponds.com)
    After a five-day period in which scientists fed Vacquinol-1 to mice with GBM, they found that the substance had increased activity in the cancer cells to the point that they simply “exploded.” “Vacquinols stimulate death by membrane ruffling, cell rounding, massive macropinocytic vacuole accumulation, ATP depletion, and cytoplasmic membrane rupture of [glioblastoma cells],” explained the Karolinska Institute report. Essentially, that means the activity of the mice’s glioblastoma cells was rendered so hyper-active that the cells had no choice but to explode and die. “When cancer cells were filled with a large amount of vacuoles,” says the Institute, “the cell membranes, the outer wall of the cell, collapsed.”
  • Study: Chemotherapy May Lead To Less Peaceful Death (atlanta.cbslocal.com)
    More than half of end-stage cancer patients receive chemotherapy during the last few months of their life, and those who received such treatment were more likely to die in a hospital intensive care unit, hooked to a ventilator, rather than at home as they would have preferred, says a new study.Patients were also less likely to have discussed their end of life wishes with their oncologist compared to other end-stage cancer patients who opted not to continue chemotherapy.Researchers say doctors have a hard time initiating conversations with their patients, especially those dying from metastatic cancer.“There’s a subtle dance that happens between oncologist and patient,” Dr. Alexi Wright, an assistant professor of medicine at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and the study’s lead author, told the Boston Globe. “Where doctors don’t want to broach the subject of dying, especially in younger patients, because it makes those patients think we’re giving up on them.”
  • Terminally ill cancer sufferer Stephen Sutton forced to defend himself over online ‘dupe’ accusations (manchestereveningnews.co.uk)
    Terminally ill cancer sufferer Stephen Sutton has been forced to defend himself against cruel online accusations he ‘duped’ people following his release from hospital.Stephen, who has incurable bowel cancer, has raised more than £3.1 million for the Teenage Cancer Trust after his plight touched the hearts of people around the world.The 19-year-old previously said he was nearing the end but he was discharged from Birmingham’s Queen Elizabeth’s Hospital on Friday after doctors gave him the go-ahead to return to his home in Burntwood, Staffordshire.
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    on the Mail’s Facebook page Sarah Hill said: “Am I the only one who thinks something is not quite right here? While I hope I am wrong it feels like we are being conned.

    “One minute he tweets saying he is dying and won’t see the next day, then all of a sudden he is being released to go home. As I said, I hope I am wrong but I have a strange feeling about this.”

    Stephen, who on Friday met Prime Minister David Cameron who described him as “inspirational”, felt forced to defend himself.

    In a message he said: “Sorry to disappoint you! So you know, I still have my cancer and it’s incurable, if that makes you feel less ‘duped’ x”

  • Jay Lake (murverse.com)
    The day after the Hugo awards last year, he made a point to talk to me and tell me that he was in charge of caring for/keeping track of the Campbell tiara. He told me that, in addition to me winning the award, he was passing that responsibility to me, since he thought I was passionate enough about the award to make sure the tiara tradition continued. I nearly cried right there.One of the biggest thrills of my life was receiving the Campbell Award from Jay and his daughter, and then getting a picture with them afterward. Jay is well loved and will be missed.lake_campbell
  • 6 Stories That Prove the Mind Has the Power to Heal the Body (thehealersjournal.com)
    My book Mind Over Medicine is full of data scientifically proving that the mind can heal- or harm- the body. But data can be dry, and sometimes what resonates most deeply within our souls are stories. So sit back, grab a cup of tea, and let’s have story time. I’m going to tell you a few true stories that will demonstrate to you how powerfully the mind affects your physiology.
  • Chemotherapy proven to cause death (wakeupcallnews.blogspot.com)
    Chemotherapy is one of the worst forms of cancer treatment there is, primarily because of the horrific chemicals involved, but also because it is simply an agonizing way to kill.According to a newly published study in the British Medical Journal, more than half of end-stage cancer patients are given chemotherapy during the final few months of their life, and those who received such treatment were much more likely to die uncomfortably: in a hospital intensive care unit hooked to a ventilator, rather than at home as they wanted.
  • Saudi opposition reports King Abdullah has terminal lung cancer (worldtribune.com)
    In a statement on April 17, the institute, aligned with the Shi’ite opposition, said Abdullah was “suffering from terminal lung cancer.” The statement said Abdullah, known as a chain smoker, was seen wearing a breathing tube during his meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama on March 28. The king was also seen with the tube on April 4 when Abdullah returned to Riyad from his retreat in Rawdat Khuraim.
  • Have People Used Baking Soda to Treat Cancer for 10 Cents/Day? (therebel.org)
    The National Cancer Institute  says that cancer treatment costs between $31,500 and $400,000 over several years, depending on the type of cancer one is suffering from. One of the cheapest ways to treat cancer is probably something you’ve never heard of, yet  Dr. Tullio Simoncini  of Rome found a possible treatment that takes around three weeks and costs literally pennies. But his simple, yet revolutionary idea was shunned by the medical industry, even though he was a successful oncologist. Nonetheless, Simoncini has destroyed cancerous tumors with nothing more than sodium bicarbonate, otherwise known as baking soda. Baking soda works by ‘shocking’ cancer cells with alkalinity. The extracellular (interstitial) pH (pHe) of solid tumors is significantly more acidic compared to normal tissues.
  • Wilko Johnson diagnosed with terminal cancer (guardian.co.uk)
    Wilko Johnson has been diagnosed with terminal cancer of the pancreas. The news became public via a story in the Echo, the local paper in Johnson’s hometown of Southend, and spread after local musician and music historian Will Birch tweeted the news, having read it in the Echo.
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Cancerous Black Holes

Learning that you have cancer can be a difficult experience. After a person is diagnosed with cancer, he or she may feel anxious, afraid or overwhelmed and wonder how he or she can cope during the days ahead.

first of all you should know that cancer is not any more such a live threatening disease as half a century ago. When you are diagnosed with cancer main point is at first to obtain as much basic, useful information as possible about your cancer diagnosis. Consider bringing a family member or friend with you to your first few doctor appointments. Write down your questions and concerns beforehand and bring them with you. You should not be afraid to talk about it but also to question certain things.

Each person should be aware that the cancer of the one person is not the same as the cancer of the other. As such the first question to been asked should be: “What kind of cancer do I have?” followed by: “Where is the cancer and has it spread?”

On our mind is naturally if that cancer we have can be treated and “What is the chance that my cancer can be cured?”

Next you should be open to see and follow what other tests or procedures you may need. You have to come to see your treatment options and how the treatment will benefit you.

When a person knows what he or she can expect during treatment, he or she can feel more at ease. The best way to conquer cancer is not to haver ‘cancer thoughts’ or negative thoughts in mind. It is so important not to be a ‘kankeraar’ (‘canceror’), i.e. a grouser, grumbler or whiner. To be a bellyacher will not bring any solution. All cankerous thoughts should be put away first.

Those who are always grousing or moaning about something should make the best effort to change their attitude and to come to tackling the world in a better way.

If they can not do that on their own,it is not bad to look at others who had to face that disease and see how they managed to cope or fight against the cancer.

We all can learn from those who are facing such a threatening disease. They had to undergo side effects of the treatment, and it shall not be different for us. So knowing how they could cope with those annoying side effects it may help us.

We should always remember we should always call the doctor as soon as possible and not be afraid to ask him many questions, such as: “What can I do to prevent my cancer from recurring?”, “How likely are my children or other family members to get cancer?”

As with any “whopper” of a disease it is important to maintain honest, two-way communication with your loved ones, doctors and others after your cancer diagnosis. You may feel particularly isolated if people try to protect you from bad news or if you try to put up a strong front. If you and others express your emotions honestly, you can all gain strength from each other.

Members of cancer support groups may be particularly helpful in the areas about reactions on the treatment. Getting advice on the drugs (causing hair loss), advice from image experts about clothing, makeup, wigs and hairpieces may help you feel more comfortable and attractive. Insurance often helps pay for wigs, prostheses and other adaptive devices. and can provide tips that have helped them and others.

Maintaining a healthy lifestyle is always important, but when our body shows a weakness it is even more important. We for sure should not be afraid to go out the house, hiding ourselves, being afraid for what they might think of us. Taking some outdoors exercise can improve your energy level. Eating a healthy diet consisting of a variety of foods and getting adequate rest may help you manage the stress and fatigue of the cancer and its treatment. Exercise and participating in enjoyable activities also may help. Recent data suggest that people who maintain some physical exercise during treatment not only cope better, but may also live longer.

Taking more care of yourself and your willingness to talk with others and share ideas, not thinking you our the only one who knows and feels what it is, will help you to gain more confidence to go into a new stadium in life, where you can win the battle, when you trust yourself and those around you.

Together we can do more” is for sure very important too.

Good luck.

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Additional helpful literature:

  1. Our way of life
  2. Pain and Suffering is inevitable but Misery is optional
  3. The blessing of a broken leg
  4. Partakers of the sufferings
  5. Foreword to Suffering
  6. Suffering (Cd art)
  7. Suffering – through the apparent silence of God
  8. Suffering continues
  9. Suffering leading to joy
  10. Seems no future in suffering
  11. Learning from suffering
  12. Reacting to Disasters
  13. Dying or not
  14. Words from God about suffering
  15. Self inflicted misery #1 The root by man
  16. Self inflicted misery #7 Good news to our suffering
  17. Self inflicted misery #9 Subject to worldly things
  18. Welfare state and Poverty in Flanders #3 Right to Human dignity
  19. Science, belief, denial and visibility 2
  20. Faith and trial
  21. Fragments from the Book of Job #1: chapters 1-12
  22. Fragments from the Book of Job #2: chapters 12-20
  23. Fragments from the Book of Job #3: chapters 21-26
  24. Fragments from the Book of Job #4: chapters 27-31
  25. Fragments from the Book of Job #5: chapters 32-37
  26. Fragments from the Book of Job #6: chapters 38-42
  27. Fragments from the Book of Job #7 Epilogue
  28. Bad things no punishment from God
  29. Profitable disasters
  30. Facing disaster fatigue
  31. Salvation, trust and action in Jesus #1 Suffering covered by Peace Offering
  32. Miracles in our time of suffering
  33. Offer in our suffering
  34. Patient waiting (Cd art)
  35. Character is built
  36. Suffering produces perseverance
  37. Moving mountains
  38. Rejoice even though bound to grieve
  39. Suffering redemptive because Jesus redeemed us from sin
  40. Surprised by joy
  41. Surprised by time in joys & sufferings
  42. Destination of the earth
  43. Expiatory sacrifice
  44. Crucifixion for suffering
  45. From pain to purpose
  46. Old age
  47. Temptation and its conquest
  48. Pain and Suffering is inevitable but Misery is optional
  49. Light within
  50. To be chained by love for another one
  51. When the wind blows hard on a tree
  52. Your struggles develop your strengths
  53. The inspiring divine spark
  54. Disappointed with God
  55. Not sure there exist a God
  56. God’s Comfort
  57. Only one God
  58. Some one or something to fear #6 Faith in the Most High
  59. Commit your self to the trustworthy creator
  60. Getting out of the dark corners of this world
  61. God should be your hope
  62. Our relationship with God, Jesus and eachother
  63. Nuturing a close relationship with God
  64. Give your worries to God
  65. Let us recognise how great God is
  66. God is the strength of my heart
  67. God Helper and Deliverer
  68. God is positive
  69. God’s design in the creation of the world
  70. God’s instruction about joy and suffering
  71. God’s promises
  72. God His measure not our measure
  73. God’s non answer
  74. God’s promises to us in our suffering
  75. Gods hope and our hope
  76. God’s salvation (Cd art)
  77. You God hold the future
  78. Hope (Cd art)
  79. Hope for the future
  80. Importuning for suffering hearts
  81. Incomplete without the mind of God
  82. Is God hiding His face when He is seemingly silent
  83. Jehovah my strenght
  84. Kingdom of God what will it be like
  85. God His reward
  86. Chrystalised harmonious thinking
  87. Epitome of the one faith
  88. Life with God
  89. Meaning of life
  90. Some important differences
  91. True hope
  92. Working of the hope (Cd art)
  93. A love not exempting us from trials
  94. Songs in the night Worship God only
  95. Gospel = Good tidings, good news, a good message
  96. That the righteousness of the law might be fulfilled in us

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  • National Cancer Survivor Day 2014: A Reminder That Life After Cancer Can Be Healthy, Meaningful (medicaldaily.com)
    There is life after a cancer diagnosis, and it’s something to celebrate, especially among the 14 million cancer survivors in the U.S. Survivors can be anyone who has been diagnosed with cancer at some point, and even family members, friends, and caregivers are a part of the survivorship experience. “Sometimes people have very negative ideas of what life after cancer looks like,” the National Cancer Survivors Day Foundation spokesperson, Laura Shipp, told CBS 5. “But the reality is that more people are living longer and better quality lives after cancer than ever before. These survivors are showing us that life after cancer can be meaningful, exciting, and filled with joy.”
  • Cancer Research Institute Launches TheAnswerToCancer.org, a Website for Cancer Patients and Caregivers (socialmediaportal.com)
    “As major advances in cancer immunotherapy begin to alter the landscape of cancer treatment, patients facing a cancer diagnosis need to be aware of immunotherapy as a potential treatment option for them,” said Jill O’Donnell-Tormey, Ph.D., CEO and director of scientific affairs at the Cancer Research Institute. “Our new website, TheAnswerToCancer.org, informs patients about these new treatments, and encourages them to talk with their doctors about immunotherapy.”
  • Providing an extra layer of support for cancer patients (miamiherald.com)
    “With all the research and new medications, cancer doesn’t have to be a death sentence,” she says. “But it is something with which I had to cope and now I have to live.”Coping is what palliative care is all about. In case you’ve never heard of it, palliative care involves an interdisciplinary group of caregivers who work to relieve suffering and improve the quality of life of people with serious or chronic illnesses as well as their families, explains Dr. Patrick Reynolds, the cancer institute’s medical director of oncology support services.
  • South Jersey cancer survivors gather for Kennedy Cancer Survivors Day (nj.com)
    “Our mission is to celebrate all of the survivors, and afford them an opportunity to reconnect with their caregivers,” said Louise Baca, administrator of the Kennedy Cancer Center. “This day is all about them.”The day included food, live entertainment, a dunk tank and children’s activities. Survivors Day doubles as a walk that raises money for the cancer center’s assistance program, which provides financial help for cancer patients and their families. To date, the program has given out about $30,000 in assistance.”Their insurance is okay for treatment,” Baca said. “Our fund is for everything else. If because of treatment, they’re having financial difficulties, we’ll pay rent, food or transportation costs.”
  • Breast Cancer Authority Bestseller List Book Review & Giveaway “The Holistic Approach to Breast Cancer” (breastcanceryogablog.com)
    Explore the physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual disharmony at the root of breast dis-ease with timely, practical suggestions and methods for healing you won’t hear at your doctor’s office. In my book The Holistic Approach to Breast Cancer I encourage and support you to listen to the underlying messages that come with breast cancer so you can thrive beyond it.
  • Cancer Survivors: More Than 14.5 Million in US (abcnews.go.com)
    Cancer survivors now number more than 14.5 million in the United States and are expected to grow to 19 million over the next decade, a new report finds. More cancers are cured, more people are living longer with the disease and people are living longer in general, which boosts the number of cases and survivors because the risk of developing cancer rises with age.”They’re living longer and we hope with better quality of life,” said Dr. Patricia Ganz of the University of California, Los Angeles, whose research focuses on quality-of-life issues.The American Cancer Society’s report was released Sunday during the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the world’s largest group of specialists who treat the disease.
  • A Human Experimenter Was Vice-President Of The American Cancer Society (blacklistednews.com)
    A doctor who was once vice president of the The American Cancer Society turns out to have had a dark history. He twice experimented on human beings, injecting them with cancer cells. Learn about the human experimentation of Chester Southam.
  • On step closer to a nanoparticle breath sensor to test for lung cancer (nanowerk.com)
    Results of a University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) show that a test of organic compounds in exhaled breath can not only distinguish patients with lung cancer from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but can also define the stage of any cancer present. “This could totally revolutionize lung cancer screening and diagnosis. The perspective here is the development of a non-traumatic, easy, cheap approach to early detection and differentiation of lung cancer,” says Fred R. Hirsch, MD, PhD, investigator at the CU Cancer Center and professor of medical oncology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.
  • The Benefits of Complementary and Alternative Therapies When Dealing with Cancer (health-host.co.uk)

    The use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) is on the rise, globally. More and more people are turning to CAM to treat a wide range of health issues when they feel that traditional medical products and practices (when used alone) are not working for them. Complementary and alternative medicines are fast becoming a favourite way of dealing with a wide range of health implications, particularly for those who are suffering from cancer.

    While the use of CAM is often deemed controversial, as an individual suffering from a life debilitating disease it is always important to be aware of the alternative treatments that are not offered by doctors.

  • South Florida hospitals offer breast cancer survivorship programs to empower people with the next phase of their lives (miamiherald.com)
    After the surgery, radiation and chemotherapy for breast cancer lies the next phase of a person’s life.Survivorship refers to that time, often beginning at diagnosis and through long-term survival, when the physical and emotional after-effects of breast cancer treatment may linger.Now, South Florida hospitals are taking an active, more comprehensive approach to survivorship, instituting programs to address that next phase — to improve patients’ quality of life and empower them to live healthier lives after cancer.

    “We recognize that survivorship comes with challenges, and they have to face a lot of physical changes from treatment, as well as social, spiritual, familial, professional and financial challenges,” said Dr. Carmen Calfa, an oncologist who specializes in breast cancer at Memorial Breast Cancer Center in Hollywood.

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Center For Reason

So my mother calls me tonight and let me just say this right off ** I’m paraphrasing the conversation for the purposes of brevity, in case she contacts you and claims I posted this “out of context” **

So we were talking about a neighbor of hers who is going through cancer treatment and the prognosis isn’t good. She says, so many people are going to die of cancer and they are never going to find a cure.

I interrupted her and told her about the newly released studies showing a 90%+ success rate in curing certain types of cancer with stem cell treatments. She says she hasn’t seen it and continues with …..”that’s why I never give to the susan g. komen foundation or any other cancer research group…..they are just a billion dollar black hole of tax evasion”

I was a bit taken off my guard. This was…

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Mourners Celebrate Life Of Inspirational Cancer Teen

Stephen SuttonStephen Sutton, a young man who had to face cancer, but did not let it bring him down, has died. His spirit, bravery and determination to live life to the full was and should be an inspiration to us all.

Sutton, from Burntwood, Staffordshire, who spent his last weeks raising more than £3million for the Teenage Cancer Trust charity, died on Wednesday after being re-admitted to hospital at the weekend with breathing difficulties and his family said his condition was rapidly deteriorating.

For all healthy and sick people it is good to take this young man in mind.

“Stephen didn’t measure life in time, preferring instead to measure it by the difference someone makes. Stephen has made an enormous difference to Teenage Cancer Trust and the seven young people diagnosed with cancer every day who need our help.”

said Siobhan Dunn, chief executive of Teenage Cancer Trust which Sutton raised his money for.

stephen sutton last facebook photo

The final photo posted on Stephen Sutton’s Facebook

You may find on Facebook RIP Steven Sutton and already a Facebook page Steven Sutton deserves an OBE.

No point in meauring life in timeNo matter his illness which he knew would bring soon bring an end to his life this boy was full of life and wanted to do many things in his life. He wanted to try to make the world a better place no matter what.

Kenneth Blanchard with many others found Stephen a fantastic lad who was always thinking of others and will be sadly missed.

The Teenage Cancer Trust wrote on its site:

Stephen Sutton, the amazing young man who did so much to raise funds and awareness for Teenage Cancer Trust has died. The thoughts of everyone here at Teenage Cancer Trust are with Stephen’s family and friends. We are humbled and hugely grateful for what Stephen achieved, and continues to achieve, for young people with cancer.

Stephen Sutton was a normal kid who did well at school, had ambitions of becoming a doctor, played lots of sports and played drums in a local band. Like anyone else his age, he liked socializing and going out with friends.

Then in 2010, when he was 15, he was diagnosed with stage 3B colorectal cancer. After 6 months of crippling symptoms he underwent a hemicolectomy to remove a tumour from his bowel, then had 6 months of chemotherapy. The treatment had all kinds of side effects but throughout it he was determined not to let the treatment and diagnosis get on top of him.

Stephen Sutton cancer patient full of lifeIn January 2013, diagnosed with a s continued growing and spreading cancer, this young lad decided to share his life and outlook with the whole world, starting off by making a Facebook page called Stephen’s story. I’ve raised over £160,000 so far, through events ranging from charity quizzes, to a skydive to dinner parties. I think there should be some fun in fundraising, and I always encourage people to try something new.

Stephen Sutton Cancer my bitch

I smile because I have a lot to smile about. I’ve seen a lot, achieved a lot — and had a lot of fun doing it too. – Now he is gone but his spirit may carry on.

Stephen’s Story has expanded to other forms of social media including Twitter, Tumblr and Instagram. Facebook acquired over 12,500 dedicated Facebook fans and over 16,000 followers on Twitter at one point, and he hoped to inspire people with motivational quotes, humour and positivity.

His time on this world was too short. Lichfield Cathedral had to be host for his death body, but had to see his spirit was much alive, seeing a sea of yellow as the vigil for Stephen was held this Thursday and Friday. The respons of local shops and homes in Lichfield to an appeal to ‘paint the town yellow’ was nicely followed and the home town, Burntwood, was covered in yellow ribbons in memory of this strong boy who made it possible that many other people could be helped in the future.

At 6pm on Thursday, Stephen’s coffin had left his home in Burntwood by horse-drawn carriage, entering Lichfield by The Bowling Green, passing along The Friary, Swan Road and Bird Street before entering the Close. He was taken into the cathedral at 7pm and laid in a place of honour and given a short opening ceremony at the cathedral. The Cathedral remained open until midnight for people to pay their respects. When I watched the Breakfast Show on BBC I could already see the many people passing from 7am on Friday, before a public farewell ceremony at 3pm that afternoon.

All are welcome to attend. At 3.45pm on Friday, Stephen’s coffin will exit the Close and leave Lichfield for a private family funeral.

His mother wrote on Facebook:

My heart is bursting with pride but breaking with pain for my courageous, selfless, inspirational son who passed away peacefully in his sleep in the early hours of this morning, Wednesday 14th May. The ongoing support and outpouring of love for Stephen will help greatly at this difficult time, in the same way as it helped Stephen throughout his journey. We all know he will never be forgotten, his spirit will live on, in all that he achieved and shared with so many.

It is nice we can see people like Stephen and Matt who had this amazing ability to just make you forget, to have you laughing at old stories or chatting away about what’s been going on at work, and suddenly nothings wrong, you’re not talking to someone who’s ill, you’re just talking to Matt or Stephen. Such personalities are needed in a society who is afraid to face the illnesses that can kill.

Under the constant shadow of terminal bowel cancer – creating a bucket list and spreading awareness to other young people Stephen saw his campaign gain rapid momentum.

In an interview with The Sun when he was well enough, the teenager said:

“You only get one shot at life. I need to make every second count.”

Before his death, Stephen, who was diagnosed aged just 15, said:

“I don’t see the point in measuring life in terms of time any more. I’d rather measure life in terms of making a difference.”

You may say he made a difference and let every second of his life be of some importance by which he also dared to put himself at the side and be there to help others.

It was that attitude which earned the highest praise and admiration, including from celebrities including  Benedict Cumberbatch, Jason Manford, Simon Pegg , Russell Brand, Simon Cowell, and Ricky Gervais.
Prime Minister David Cameron went to meet Stephen while in hospital, and following his death on May 14, said:

“I’m deeply saddened to hear that Stephen Sutton has died. His spirit, bravery and fund-raising for cancer research were all an inspiration.”

The Mirror front page for tomorrow’s paper. – A fitting tribute to a courageous teenager who was taken too soon.

Rock legend Roger Daltrey paid tribute to Stephen last night.

The Who frontman, 70, said to the Sun:

“The courage of the boy was amazing. Stephen became an inspiration to teenagers around the world.

“His short life will have an impact for years to come. It is very hard for the family but he was so resilient.

“You’d never think he was so ill. He had incredible spirit and encouraged other teenagers not to hide away from the illness.

“The world needs examples like Stephen so teenagers can get the treatment they need.” {Sun Press associates}

Many can learn from how he looked at himself:

“I actually I see myself as very fortunate- despite being incurable for a while I have had a sustained period of very good health where I was able to go out and enjoy things thoroughly…”

“Ultimately, there is no miracle cure for me. I am potentially the most positive and optimistic person in the world, but we have to be realistic with what we are up against. My disease is very advanced and will get me eventually, but I will try my damn hardest to be here as long as possible.”

Jason Manford, who helped to champion Stephen’s fundraising, paid tribute to the teenager as being

“the most inspiring person I’ve ever met”.

The comedian added:

“He was an incredibly positive young man and a credit to his family, to Burntwood and to humanity itself.

“The reason we took to him so passionately was because he was better than us, he did something that none of us could even imagine doing.

“In his darkest hour he selflessly dedicated his final moments to raising millions of pounds for teenagers with cancer.

“Some of Stephen’s words will stay with me and others forever and they are words to live by – ‘life isn’t measured in time, it’s measured in achievements’.

“If that’s true, Stephen, then you had a fulfilling life full of special moments and you will live long in the memory of thousands, if not millions, of people.”

Many well wishers gave a thumbs up as the coffin of Stephen Sutton stood in Lichfield Cathedral during a two day vigil in his memory.

Stephen pictured with his mother, Jane, who left a moving tribute to her son on the Stephen's Story Facebook page Stephen pictured with his mother, Jane, who left a moving tribute to her son on the Stephen’s Story Facebook page

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The Guestwriters team wishes his family strength and hope they can find comfort that Stephen could inspire many others and followed his dreams, showing others that even when their life sadly may be full of misery it is still possible to enjoy that shortened life.

Making a difference

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Stephen Sutton Sticking up thumbsPlease do find what Stephen Sutton has raised at the Stephen’s fundraising page which stood at Raised: 189% on May 31 2014: £4,164,869.00 raised of £1,000,000.00 targe; 178,284 donations

Follow Stephen’s story on Facebook

#ThumbsupforStephen

Find also about Matthew Burton who was cared for at the YPU unit at the QE hospital Birmingham and who too are fund raising for The Teenage Cancer Trust (though not quite on Stephens scale) : McHeroes London 2 Brighton! … trekking 100km from London to Brighton for Teenage Cancer Trust because they do fantastic work for young people.

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There’s no rule book on how to manage grief or the death of a person you know or have connected with. There’s no right or wrong way to feel and everyone will react differently.

There are some organisations who offer support at times of bereavement and loss.

www.samaritans.org

www.cruse.org.uk

www.winstonswish.org.uk

www.childline.org.uk

If you are worried about your health, speak to a doctor or visit www.nhs.uk

See Also:

Stephen Sutton’s Final Inspirational Facebook Photo‘Give Him A State Funeral’: These Stephen Sutton Tributes Are Amazing

Stephen Sutton: How a teenager touched our hearts – and raised over £3m for charity

Inspirational British teen fund-raiser with cancer dies at 19

Stephen Sutton dies aged 19: Recap reaction and tributes after cancer fund-raising hero’s death

Stephen Sutton, teenage cancer fundraiser, has died

Stephen Sutton ‘angry’ over cancer misdiagnosis

Stephen Sutton’s bucket list

Stephen Sutton Vigil: Mourners Celebrate Life Of Inspirational Cancer Teen (Pictures)

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