Tag Archives: Great Britain

60 years after creation of European Economic Community, Europeans skeptical about one of their biggest achievements this century

Anti-European movements seem to be enjoying a fair wind, not only in Great Britain but also here on our side of the Channel. This demonstrates how Euroskepticism has become a threat to the fundamental values of the common European life.

Although the EU considers itself a unity, it is unable to introduce a united policy. In the absence of such policy, it is impossible to overcome the growing economical and social inequalities between the citizens of the Member States.

The European Economic Community, founded 60 years ago, was meant to maintain and guarantee peace. More than ever nowadays, in an unsafe world where hundreds of thousands are fleeing the horrors of war, we should embrace and take care of this precious gift of peace. Though many people today are willing to step out of the union, this is not the moment. It would be reckless to put all of it on the line.

People may not forget that we have already so many years of no war experience. In our regions the EU also managed to protect democracy: the freedom of press, freedom of speech and a free choice of religion (those being just a fraction of the inviolable rights Europeans enjoy).

All Member States of the EU have to ensure democratic guidelines, and countries aiming to join the EU cannot hinder reform processes. This contributes to the broadening of democratic values.

Two essential aspects of the European Union are the free movement of persons and a single currency. Admittedly, they Euro Series Banknotes.pngare not perfectly elaborated; the Euro being the most commonly criticised aspect. However, in the Euro Zone, currency exchange disappeared along with the attached fees. We can cross the borders of all EU countries without passport control or visa requirements. It is really a pity that the last few months we saw the Schengen Agreement undermined. That agreement is the seal of proof for our ‘Union’, which assured a free movement concept within the internal borders, not only contributing to the economical dynamism but also to an inter-cultural exchange and thus to peace and understanding between different cultures.

No border control: Border crossing between two Schengen Agreement states, view from Germany to the Netherlands. The Netherlands begins at the red line added to the photo.

The ex-communist countries by putting up walls are forgetting what it meant to be inclosed and are taking on a very selfish attitude. Free movement across our internal border-states is necessary, but also an allowance for people and goods entering our community.

Map of Europe indicating the four member countries of the Visegrád Group

Visegrad Group, also called the Visegrad Four, or V4 is a cultural and political alliance of four Central European states – Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia – for the purposes of furthering their European integration, as well as for advancing military, economic and energy cooperation with one another.[

All the Visegrád countries now have leaders who could be fairly described as national-populists. In Western Europe, their rhetoric would often put them at the far-right of the political spectrum: they typically reject migrants and Islam, and do not wish to reproduce the Westerners’ experiment in multiculturalism in their own countries. This has led to clashes with Western Europe, notably Angela Merkel’s Germany, and the European Commission, who have advocated the welcoming of millions of refugees and the distribution of thousands across Central Europe.

Furthermore, all these nations – with the exception of Poland – have made various pro-Russian statements, and implied that they would ideally want a reconciliation and reinforcement of economic ties with Moscow. This bodes ill for the maintenance of the EU’s sanctions against Russia, in retaliation for the annexation of Crimea, and which can only be maintained by unanimity. More generally, Trump’s traumatic surprise electoral win in the United States is likely to embolden Central European conservatives in challenging Brussels and Berlin’s leadership of the EU.

Central Europe according to The World Factbook (2009),[17] Encyclopædia Britannica, and Brockhaus Enzyklopädie (1998)

The area in which this is most apparent is perhaps demographics. Central Europe faces severe medium-term decline in the face of ongoing emigration – while wages have risen, they remain much higher in the West – and extremely low fertility, which goes from 1.3 children per woman in Poland to 1.5 in the Czech Republic.

As a result, the European Commission projects that all these nations, with the exception of the Czech Republic, will see a drastic decline in population between now and 2080, falling by as much as 25 percent. In Poland, this would mean almost 10 million less people. This will inevitably mean a weaker Central Europe in the world, with a rapidly-shrinking labour force obligated to commit an ever-greater share of resources to an exploding population of pensioners.

The case of demographics shows the weaknesses of Visegrád’s alternative vision for Europe. Borders and national sovereignty are indeed means of slowing change, including undesirable change. But in themselves, they would do little to halt Europe’s decline to an elderly collection of statelets on the western Eurasian periphery. No doubt more creative and forward-looking measures are needed to prevent such a scenario and secure a sovereign Europe’s place among this century’s leading powers.

Everywhere in Europe we have to face the problem of the older getting population. Europe shall need young men and women to strengthen our workforce. When we can help rescuing people fleeing for the horrors of war we should open our borders.

Therefore, we can only shake our heads when we hear that others plan on building walls. Europe is familiar with such division. We must not let it come to that point anymore. To question the free movement of persons, on anyone’s behalf, would be a major setback for this free and diverse community.

The EU is not perfect but it assures peace and safety in Europe. To criticise it, is legitimate. To destroy it, is not.

We cannot deny that reforms and innovations are needed to make the EU fit for the future. However, these reforms can only be completed through unity and cohesion and not through antipathy and inner conflict.

A strengthening of the European Union is very overdue.

Isn’t it a privilege to be able to call our neighbours our friends? To move freely without passport control? Not to have to exchange currency? And moreover: to live in peace?

For us Europeans, these privileges have become self-evident, just like so many other things in the EU. And yet so many are beginning to question it all.

With thanks to Vox Europe

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Preceding articles

Still Hope though Power generating long train of abuses

Challenges and impact on freedom of movement within the EU

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Additional reading

  1. Migrants to the West #1
  2. Migrants to the West #2
  3. Migrants to the West #3
  4. Migrants to the West #6
  5. Migrants to the West #8 Welbeing
  6. Europe and much-vaunted bastions of multiculturalism becoming No God Zones
  7. 2015 Human rights
  8. Religion, fundamentalism and murder
  9. Religious Freedom in a Multicultural World
  10. The New gulf of migration and seed for far right parties
  11. Problems by losing the borders
  12. Brexit: The mother of all uncertainties
  13. Walls,colours, multiculturalism, money to flow, Carson, Trump and consorts

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Related articles

  1. With EU and U.S. Distracted, Central and Eastern European Countries Crack Down on Civil Society
  2. European Travel Information and Authorisation System (ETIAS) [Policy Podcast]
  3. Schengen area: Update and state of play
  4. Hungary: The Abject Failure of the EU
  5. UK & Europe
  6. UK: MP McDonagh chairwoman of the all-party parliamentary group of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community calls crack down of radicalisation
  7. Brexit bill to go before MPs from Monday
  8. Brexit, Blair and doing the right thing
  9. Will UK Nationals Lose their EU Citizens’ Rights after Brexit?
  10. Pros and cons of multi-speed EU
  11. Poland ‘alone’ in the EU after Tusk re-election snub — Anti-European Union storm clouds — “The EU is in Germany’s sphere of influence.”
  12. Ordanoski: There is only one direction for Balkan countries – west
  13. As ECB Charts Economic Course, Politics Complicate the Picture
  14. EPRS circular economy infographic
  15. Berlin calls for dialogue to mitigate risks in Balic Sea region
  16. Reactions to the ECJ decision on asylum law in EU
  17. Europe: Poland fails to stop Donald Tusk EU re-election
  18. Donald Tusk re-elected as European council president
  19. Much to Poland’s Chagrin, Donald Tusk Wins Second Term as European Council President
  20. The European pass or how to expel more

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2 Comments

Filed under Headlines - News, History, Juridical matters, Political affairs, Social affairs, Welfare matters

Tribes Redux

All over Europe we are feeling the pressure of certain people who think the country belongs to them only, even when their ancestors immigrated to that country which was then willing to receive them and to give them a place to build up a better life. But now their grand- or over-grandchildren do not want to give others such a chance to make something better out of their life.

The far-right (or today also called the Alt-right) becoming stronger in West-Europe and now also spreading like a virus over the United States of America and Canada, should make those who feel more for a democratic system more worried and anxious to take action, for bringing a halt to this fungus which can make our whole nation rotten and a dangerous swamp to live in.

Good that William Hill does not keep his writings private any more.
He likes to start each posting with a quote by someone past or present that speaks to the topic he want to address.Today he starts of with a quote from the young Kenian journalist at Africanews, Euronews and co-host for Ebru News “Aiming at the 4th°. First. Fast. Factual. Final & Future word” who thinks

The world is a sitcom waiting to be written. Start young.

Robert Kodingo who has a news room with French, English African and Nigerian speakers and sends praise from Nigeria (on Periscope TV). Robert Kodingo his quote

“We hate each other by race, color, tribe, wealth, gender etc because everyone wants to feel special and different than the other. I do not however have a solution on how people can stop having an ego that makes them specially superior than the other.”

should make us to see how ego has conquered the capitalist world.

William Hill or Bill his thoughts are sometimes serious and personal, sometimes just humorous, sometimes intentionally provocative (to make the reader assess their own thoughts on the subject and to elicit a comment). He also could see what is going on in Europe.

He also is not blind to notice that loss of old national sovereignty with subservience to Brussels’ bureaucracy might have been a good reason for many to go for a Brexit. {Immigration} He writes

but the largest reason is the huge influx of Middle Eastern and North African immigrants flooding into Europe, financially taxing, particularly the western, northern industrial nations. That, and the fear that embedded among them are terrorists bent on destroying western civilization. {Immigration}

But he suspects there’s a more truthful reason.

“It is interesting…the rhetoric [and] the gathering strength of right wing politics….Everywhere in the West ‘immigration’ [is spoken] in terms of the end of …’culture’, displaying signs of feeling threatened by these ‘others,’ who are portrayed as an invasive force.” ( Himani Bannerji.) {Immigration}

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In Europe our states or countries are free to be part of the European Union or to stay out or like Great-Britain has shown, to leave.For a long time our guest-writer Bill espoused his belief that free, open and unencumbered travel and residency should be a right of all peoples, that globally – that right enjoyed by citizens within the United States and the European Union, respectively – should apply to everyone, world-wide. {The Great Wall of Donald}From his writings we may learn that many American Christians seem to be sitting with a very very old idea

if you worked hard enough you could become a rich, influential person. For centuries the only ones who needed to be educated to succeed were the clergy. {Education in America}

From the same article we learn at our surprise that not many Christians from the U.S.A. are holding postgraduate degrees:

Hindus – 48%

Jews – 35%

Buddhists– 26%

Catholics – 10% {Ed. note: we do not know Bill only looks at Roman Catholics, like often many Americans do or at all Catholics}

Protestants – 9%

(Not mentioned were those without a confessed religion. I wonder what percentage they are?)

If you wonder (as I did at first) why Christians are so far behind other religious, I think the answer is cultural.

Buddists and Hindus both share a similiar belief that the soul’s future condition is dependent on the knowledge acquired by the mind in this lifetime, that knowledge becomes understanding of life, and that is the ultimate goal of life. (It would seem that, contrary to Christian teachings that all understanding will be granted to the soul upon death,  Buddists and Hindus believe understaning is not a gift in the next life, rather something to be strove for in this life.)

The Jews for most of their history – at least in Europe – were not allowed to own land (which was the riches of the day) and they had to be ready to leave on a moment’s notice to escape local progoms against them.  Hence an education was portable and enabled them to find work without being tied to one place.  {Education in America}

 

No wonder than perhaps we can find so many who are carried away so easily by words from some one who knows his rhetoric well. For politicians it is proffered that their folks do not think too much for themselves. Therefore certain countries are trying to give the idea to their inhabitants they are ‘somewhat’ or that they can get a ‘degree’ but that degree does not say much or has not much value opposite the degrees of renowned universities. The Donald Trump University promised to give some money back to those who complained they are ripped off.

It is known that

Males of most species of animals are prone to violence, yet where it is the male that is the primary care-giver and has the greater role in raising the young, it is the females that compete violently with each other. {News that doesn’t sell newspapers}

We could see many republican women who could skin Hilary Clinton alive. But for certain women the other and coloured women may also be a competitor on their market for men. and when they have to see that certain of those women of an other race can climb higher than them it makes it very painful.

Certain politicians playing in on the weak part of their audience made a handy use of the fear the media is creating by lots of people.  As such by the fear mongering in several nations of Europe and different states in the United States, those who found an easy way to point at a target or culprit, proclaiming nationalism, anti-immigrant and religious intolerance.

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To remember

  • significant up-tick in the level and number (almost a daily occurrence) of violent confrontations racially + ethnically,
  • US, a nation of immigrants + freedom of religion + who for the last sixty years promoted internationalism by multiple treaties of cooperation in multiple areas

For Bill there is a good tombstone epitaph over the grave of humanity after we destroy ourselves.


“Mine mine mine.
That was the curse and power of human beings — that what they saw and loved they had to have.
They could share it with other people but only if they conceived of those people as being somehow their own.
What we own is ours.
What you own should also be ours.
In fact, you own nothing, if we want it.
Because you are nothing.
We are the real people, you are only posing as people in order to try to deprive us of what God means us to have.”
 ― Orson Scott Card

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Preceding articles

Autumn is in the land

Enough with the Clothes Shaming of Muslim Women

American Christians have to think twice before going to vote

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Additional reading

  1. Leaving the Old World to find better pastures
  2. Migrants to the West #1
  3. Capitalism and economic policy and Christian survey
  4. The New gulf of migration and seed for far right parties
  5. Our political systems and juggling with human laws
  6. Objective views and not closing eyes for certain sayings

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Further reading

  1. Puritans and Pilgrims
  2. “We Are Not Our Grandparents:” Yeah, That’s Pretty Clear
  3. To be an ‘Aryan’
  4. Standing Rock
  5. Ancestors
  6. Ancestral Reverence
  7. The Past
  8. Gifts from our ancestors
  9. Echos of ancestors
  10. Origins
  11. 7 Things Our Ancestors Stockpiled To Survive Winter
  12. Friendship Comes in Small Gestures
  13. Don’t judge from the cover
  14. Let’s clarify! Migration, Immigration, Emigration: the importance of proper definitions.
  15. A Migrant By Any Other Name is an Expat
  16. 260 White Crosses
  17. Jo Cox: victim of ‘Leave’ hate crime.
  18. Immigration to the UK from the European Union hit a record high in the run-up to the Brexit vote
  19. A record number of migrants have arrived in Italy this year by boat
  20. 1,400 migrants rescued in Mediterranean
  21. Italy’s Minister Of Interior (Freemason): Surrender Your Homes To Migrants Or Face Jail
  22. Calais: the State in total hesitation
  23. France and Them: Expats, Migrants, Refugees
  24. Swiss immigration quotas: where do we stand?
  25. VQR 2016 Prize for Photography – Jason Florio ‘Out of the Sea’
  26. Austria News | Asylum-Seekers
  27. Bulgaria News | Asylum-Seekers
  28. A flirting coach is giving refugees dating lessons ‘to help them integrate’
  29. These migrants must be sent back to Africa and Asia. Migrant crisis: Bulgaria orders migrant deportations after riots at camp on Turkey border | World | News | Daily Express
  30. My Issue With “Stopping the Boat People”
  31. Fate of thousands of missing migrant children in Europe still unclear
  32. Merkel says EU and Turkey must stick to migration deal
  33. Child asylum seekers subjected to controversial age tests
  34. A Word To The Criminal Migrant
  35. Recycling means risk of increased crime in Denmark
  36. Erdogan threatens to allow 3m refugees cross into Europe
  37. Erdogan Warns Turkey Could Open Gates for Migrants if Pushed by EU — After EU Stops Talks With Turkey on EU membership
  38. Encounters With Racism, Anti-Semitism, and Bigotry in Germany And Beyond
  39. Video: Racist Attacks!
  40. Punk: Beyoncé Unleashes Formation
  41. The Future President
  42. America once turned its back on Anne Frank, just as Donald Trump rejects Muslim refugees today
  43. Article of the day: American ethnic politics in comparative perspective
  44. Blame Trump on the Rich, Part 4: The KKK and the two Neighborhoods Adjacent 
  45. “But why can’t we have white pride?”
  46. For White Voters, It Was Education, Stupid
  47. Republicans Can’t Be Christians — Sorry!
  48. Bridges – Stepping Forward with Lilka and Andy
  49. Cartoon of the day
  50. Reader letter: Alt-right story ‘refreshing, important’
  51. “Doctor Calls Michelle Obama ‘Monkey Face,’ But Says She’s Not Racist”
  52. Adichie’s “danger of a single story” and the Rise of Post-Truth Trumplandia
  53. 12-2-16
  54. The US once gave amnesty to almost 3 million undocumented migrants. Here’s the economic argument for doing it again
  55. Ladies and Gentlemen. The President of the United States.
  56. He’s Making a List
  57. Monochromacy
  58. Let’s All Get Vulnerable
  59. Sermon Notes – gRace Part 2: Good Fences Make Bad Neighbours
  60. Anti-Semitism in Hungary and Its Spiritual Twin Poland
  61. Honor Diversity
  62. District temporarily pulls classic novels after complaint
  63. Top 10 reasons why it’s hard to talk to some white people about race.
  64. (12/01/2016) No Less GOD’s Creation
  65. Envie de partager ce texte

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Quotes and Thoughts

“We hate each other by race, color, tribe, wealth, gender etc because everyone wants to feel special and different than the other. I do not however have a solution on how people can stop having an ego that makes them specially superior than the other.”

― Robert Kodingo

Some nations in Europe, and lately the United States, have been voting for leaders or policies that proclaim  nationalism, anti-immigrant and religious intolerance. There has been a significant up-tick in the level and number – now almost a daily occurrence – of violent confrontations racially and ethnically, without any indication of possible abeyance.

Things I find loathsome and abhorrent. Especially here, in the US, a nation of immigrants and freedom of religion and who for the last sixty years has promoted internationalism by multiple treaties of cooperation in multiple areas. The incoming Trump administration is still in the formative stages and there…

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Filed under Activism and Peace Work, Being and Feeling, Crimes & Atrocities, Economical affairs, Headlines - News, Lifestyle, Political affairs, Re-Blogs and Great Blogs, Social affairs, Welfare matters, World affairs

July 4, 1916 – Battle of the Somme greeted with ‘the greatest enthusiasm’

There’s no denying the effect of the murders. Austria-Hungary and its ally Imperial Germany rallied to the cause of war and one month later Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia. The declaration drew Germany, Russia, France, Belgium, Montenegro and Great Britain shortly after. The worst war in human history up to that time was underway. Eventually, more than 9 million soldiers and 8 million civilians would die in the war. Millions more were maimed and wounded by killing that occurred on an industrial scale. Empires were wiped from the map, new nations emerged, and the world was reshaped by more upheaval than anything that had occurred since the fall of Rome. {The Great War changed everything}

Satirical drawing by R. Ferro [Cupidity – Greed]

Cupidity

– See more at: http://www.bl.uk/world-war-one/articles/the-debate-on-the-origins-of-world-war-one#sthash.uzXCjY4z.dpuf

Establishing the responsibility for the escalation of the July Crisis into a European war – and ultimately a world war – was paramount even before fighting had begun. The governments of Great Britain, France, Russia, Germany, and Austria-Hungary tried desperately to ensure that they did not appear to be the aggressor in July and August 1914. This was crucial because the vast armies of soldiers that would be needed to fight this war could not be summoned for a war of aggression. Socialists, of whom there were many millions by 1914, would not have supported a belligerent foreign policy, and could only be relied upon to fight in a defensive war. Populations would only rally and make sacrifices willingly if the cause was just – and that meant fighting a defensive war.The French and Belgians, Russians, Serbs and British were convinced they were indeed involved in a defensive struggle for just aims. Austrians and Hungarians were fighting to revenge the death of Franz Ferdinand. Germans were assured by their Kaiser, Wilhelm II, and their Chancellor, Theobald von Bethmann Hollweg, that Germany’s neighbours had ‘forced the sword’ into its hands. {The debate on the origins of World War One}

War has no mercy for non of the parties involved. All going to the battlefields (or battlespace) bring misery to their families and others.

At one moment fighters are taken by excitement (uphory) at an other by dismay. Dejection belongs to all involved.

Experienced newspaper and magazine journalist who is currently the Director of the Leicester Centre for Journalism at De Montfort University, John Dilley, looks at the Great War whilst he conducts research into how local and national newspapers covered this first horrible experience which caught the whole world.

Today we should realise how people were used in the war-machine and how every time in such battles letters from loved ones are as important as bullets and shells for the the fighters serving in the battle places. At first they might have felt full  of energy and ambition but from their letters we know this changed quite quickly.

Cyril Newman, a lance corporal, wrote to his fiancée Winnie on receiving two letters from her:

“I feel a different person. Ten years younger – a hundred times lighter of heart. We all feel like this. The arrival of mail is vital to our happiness. ‘No Post’ gives us a kind of malaise.” {April 25, 1916 – Words of war play a vital role in saving sanity at the Front}

Though

Most of the letters were dull and repetitive but local papers did a fantastic job in spotting the extraordinary nuggets nestling among the ordinary exchange of everyday life. {April 25, 1916 – Words of war play a vital role in saving sanity at the Front}

He notices how The Daily Telegraph was typical in its eulogies saying:

“The British Empire has just sustained one of the heaviest losses which it has been called upon to bear during the whole war. The news came upon London yesterday like a crushing and senseless blow. The sorrow was unfeigned, the distress universal.” {June 13, 1916 – Grief-stricken nation mourns for Lord Kitchener sunk by the German Navy}

but also let us know how The Advertiser story gives an insight into how eagerly the public sought as many details as they could. The account goes on:

“The evening papers were quickly bought up and at first there were hopes that Lord Kitchener might be saved. {June 13, 1916 – Grief-stricken nation mourns for Lord Kitchener sunk by the German Navy}

For those who felt they could not go to the battle there was often (not to say in most of the cases) no understanding.

Cf1CpSRW4AA0RhA

This wonderful cartoon depicting a man trying to avoid First World War conscription before a Tribunal of local worthies sums up the working man’s lot in 1916. {April 18, 1916 – Laughter as men try to avoid WW1 conscription}

You may question how many listened to their inside voice or to the Words of God. And how many listened to those who  experienced the hell of German artillery.

“I had a narrow escape from at least a serious wound. I had my water bottle smashed by a piece of shrapnel. The following day I got my touch of gas – not badly – bit I felt it more as the time passed on.” {March 28, 1916 – Bells toll for mankind but peal for Fred Kilborn}

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Preceding articles

Reflections on the Great War #1 100 years on

Reflections on the Great War #2

Too Young To Fight?

Remembrance isn’t only about those who fought, but also those who refused

In Flanders Fields II – a new poem in response to the original

Lessons of the Somme

The Somme (1916) Working Class Holocaust

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Read also

  1. All the war-propaganda, all the screaming and lies and hatred, comes invariably from people who are not fighting… George Orwell
  2. Parade’s End and Saint Flora Castle
  3. 1914 – 2014 preparations
  4. 11 November, a day to remember #1 Until Industrialisation
  5. 11 November, a day to remember #2 From the Industrialisation
  6. Mons 2014 remembering the Great War
  7. Liège 2014 remembering the Great War
  8. August 4, 1914 to be remembered
  9. Honouring hundreds of thousands of victims of the brutal Somme battle
  10. Ulster Tower ceremony for the Irish at the Somme battle
  11. Aftermath
  12. Juncker warns for possible new war

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Related reading

  1. Anatomy of a World War I Artillery Barrage
  2. History is Personal 1916-2016
  3. One hundred years ago
  4. Centenary of the Battle of the Somme — July 1, 2016
  5. The Battle of the Somme
  6. Battle of the Somme – 100 Years
  7. 24 June 1916
  8. 25 June 1916
  9. 28 June 1916
  10. 29 June 1916
  11. 30 June 1916
  12. June 30, 1916
  13. 1 July 1916 – Somme
  14. Remembering Harry, a casualty of the Battle of the Somme
  15. The Last Day Of The Somme.
  16. The Lochnagar Mine
  17. The Absolutist by John Boyne – book review
  18. Review: The Great War (Sacco)
  19. The Great War changed everything
  20. Red Poppies
  21. Europe, war and the imagination

newspapers and the great war

Deeply moving events to commemorate one of the most infamous milestones of the First World War were held on Friday, exactly a century after the first British and French soldiers climbed out of the trenches at the Battle of the Somme.

We now know that July 1, 1916, was one of the bloodiest days in British military history. By nightfall, some 57,000 Commonwealth and 2,000 French soldiers had become casualties – more than 19,000 of whom had been killed.

The Battle of the Somme continued for another 140 days and when the offensive was halted in November, more than 1,000,000 Commonwealth, French and German soldiers had been wounded, captured, or killed.

Inevitably, the July 4, 1916, edition of the Market Harborough Advertiser did not report those terrible losses. However, despite the slowness of the technology a century ago, the editor manages to include the news sourced from an official Press…

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by | 2016/07/04 · 1:17 pm

Being European in a Post Brexit Britain

Britain and exit to get Brexit and to become the boomerang which shall frighten citizens of Great Britain, Europe and the U.S.A..

A referendum – a vote in which everyone (or nearly everyone) of voting age can take part – was held on Thursday 23 June, giving the inhabitants of Great Britain the opportunity to have their say to decide whether the UK should leave or remain in the European Union. Most people at the continent were convinced that the sane minds of the Britons would vote for “In”, but they and the bookkeepers were unexpectedly wrong.

According to British standards the turn out was very good, 71.8%, with more than 30 million people voting. It was the highest turnout in a UK-wide vote since the 1992 general election. But 52% to 48% decided they did not want to be involved any more in the economic and political partnership of the 28 states making up the European Union.

Whilst EU law still stands in the UK until it ceases being a member – a process which may not take long time – clearly some British people showed they have no intention to keep up a European attitude of diversity of people. Already before the election, the last few months up to the referendum, it showed that it was much more about immigration and racism than economical and political reasons. As soon the vote to leave the EU was published the aggression against foreigners and other looking people than British people became public.

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Yesterday at the Flemish television we could see and hear about non-British and nationalised immigrants in Great Britain being harassed.

The politicians have worked hard the last few months to create a hate against all foreign people in Great Britain and a disgust for all those who have an other skin colour or an other tongue.

The 27 EU member state countries their politicians should carefully look at what they have to avoid at any price.

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Male and female were created to keep each other company and to multiply creating a world were they could all live as brothers and sisters united together in a beautiful and sacred world. Of the environment man made already a terrible mess and of their way of living they proved not ever having succeeded to build up a good nice society for everyone. this gives good reason to keep working hard at the project European Union and to strive together to a liveable and loveable mini-world on this globe of diversity.

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Rhiannon, a nineteen years old half Spanish, half Welsh but of British nationality, currently studying at the University of Exeter and living in a student flat in Exeter. With university studies, work and just generally living her life, she hasn’t really had much time to dedicate to keeping up a blog and she didn’t want this to become a chore – it was never her intention to make this something that makes her feel pressured to maintain. {A Quick Update (June 2016)} but we may be pleased some youngsters also get to feel when it is really time to let their voice also be heard.

What happened on June the 27th made her decide she wanted to write more about the effects and the aftermath of the referendum first, and seemed to have become a victim herself as well.

Would it be not normal people can speak different languages? Even when living in one country and being able to speak the language of that country very easily, would it not be justified to speak the language of other family members when going out together?

Though when she went shopping with her mother she spontaneously started speaking in Spanish, just chatting about what they were buying and such. However, after about ten-fifteen minutes of that, as they were leaving the store, the mother seemed not feeling alright speaking in Spanish. When people have such reason because they are taken by fear, this should alert us Europeans and all civilised citizens.

Her mother did not find it such a good idea that they speak in Spanish and that it was best to stick to English.

Listen to what had happened and what the answer was when Rhiannon asked her why.

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Preceding:

Denmark votes in favour for a Discriminatory Nazi law

Poster: Please Help The Refugees

Tolerance Ends When There Is No Tolerance Shown Towards Us

Our life depending on faith

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Additional reading

  1. The New gulf of migration and seed for far right parties
  2. Migrants to the West #7 Religions
  3. Welfare state and Poverty in Flanders #8 Work
  4. Silence, devotion, Salafists, quietists, weaponry, bombings, books, writers and terrorists
  5. Social media a destabilisation tool in the Middle East and Syrian conflict
  6. Economic crisis danger for the rise of political extremism
  7. Preparing for an important election
  8. 2015 Economy
  9. Brexit clashes and reasons to consider to bring out the right vote
  10. Backing the wrong horse
  11. Brexit, Nexit, Vlexit and Frexit
  12. Financial mishmash
  13. Trump brand of migrant demonization #1
  14. Trump brand of migrant demonization #2
  15. Blinded crying blue murder having being made afraid by a bugaboo
  16. White Privilege Conference (WPC) wanting to keep the press out for obvious reasons
  17. Pope Francis says Catholics must become evangelisers
  18. Unity doesn’t mean uniformity
  19. Consequences of Breivik’s mass murder
  20. Religion, fundamentalism and murder

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Find also to read:

  1. Cameron decries ‘despicable racism’ and Palin dumps New World Order: Eight things to know about Brexit so far
  2. European right-wingers, emboldened by Brexit, eye their own yes-or-no votes on the future of the EU
  3. Right sees a U.S. parallel in Brexit vote–and it could be right
  4. Home is where the hate is
  5. Post-Brexit: racist attacks go mainstream in disunited kingdom
  6. Our stance against certain religions and immigrating people
  7. Pelagianism, abundant sex, no works and refugees
  8. Religion, fundamentalism and murder
  9. For those Christians who say they are the Victim
  10. What can YOU do to help stop this new wave of racism?
  11. Brexit has given voice to racism – and too many are complicit
  12. ‘Go back home’ – Bitter backlash post EU referendum
  13. After a campaign scarred by bigotry, it’s become OK to be racist in Britain | Aditya Chakrabortty
  14. I’m Stunned At How Brexit Has Unleashed Racism And Hate
  15. Brexit: Wave of hate crime and racial abuse reported following EU referendum

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Further readings

  1. Not seeing the wood for the trees: A blog on progress and setbacks
  2. Being European in a Post Brexit Britain
  3. ‘Brexit ‘- What is this all about and how it affects Europeans
  4. Brexit; My Review on the Result
  5. Brexit Nonesense
  6. Brexit: Ugly Democracy
  7. Brexit and You
  8. My father fought in WW1, and my mother learned Esperanto – this is what they would have thought of Brexit
  9. Coming to terms with ‘Brexit’
  10. Brexit: So, did Anyone have a Plan…
  11. Andrew Coyne: Voters need to be sold on the merits of open borders, not have free trade foisted on them
  12. Universal discontent with Tory government and policies triggers intergalactic referendum
  13. Hold a second referendum, British cabinet minister urges as prime minister heads to Brussels
  14. Project Fear May Be Over, But Reality Is Much More Frightening
  15. Germany Issues Demand That All Existing EU Member Nations Form Single Superstate • Now The End Begins
  16. Brexit – Will it Affect Cats and Dogs?
  17. Brexshit.
  18. If It Had Been
  19. Brexit and The Folly of Democracy
  20. What is sufficient to constitute an Article 50 notification to leave the EU?
  21. John Ivison: Britain drifts rudderless amid growing sense no-one is in charge in England after Brexit vote
  22. Richard M. Salsman: Britain will thrive after it’s free from the EU’s socialists
  23. I thought you were progressives?
  24. The ‘Leave’ Camp Won. That Doesn’t Mean Brexit Will Happen.
  25. The Brexit Vote: A British “Paul Revere” to Prep
  26. Cameron decries ‘despicable racism’ and Palin dumps New World Order: Eight things to know about Brexit so far
  27. Brexit Will Not Happen
  28. The Great Brexit Kabuki: A Masterclass In Political Theatre
  29. Gideon, We Really Can’t Wait Until September For You To Respond
  30. Brexit, nouvel ordre du jour : « C’est le temps de paniquer! » — Vraiment?
  31. British leaders want to take their time leaving the EU, but many European politicians want them out
  32. The UK Needs To Fail
  33. How Brexit Will Change America and the World
  34. Why the British Said No to Europe by John Pilger
  35. EU response to Brexit: Totalitarian Super State
  36. Brexit – venom, bile and hatred
  37. #Brexit
  38. The UK, the EU, and Berlin Station
  39. Autistic InnerSpace Comic No.66
  40. Coming to terms with ‘Brexit’
  41. Brexit: So, did Anyone have a Plan…
  42. A modest proposal – let’s have a referendum every day
  43. Brexit for Australia – And Others!
  44. Brexit: Why I voted Leave – A Singaporean in UK
  45. ‘fine thanks. oh, except for brexit’
  46. Brexit: The Disconnect
  47. And Yet…
  48. Punk, I’ve changed my mind; we need to Brexit
  49. A house divided: thoughts from a disunited kingdom
  50. Europe laughs and waves goodbye to England (the soccer team and its Brexit-loving fans)
  51. Don’t blame the young for feeling politically disillusioned
  52. Cameron decries ‘despicable racism’ and Palin dumps New World Order: Eight things to know about Brexit so far
  53. Cameron condemns xenophobic and racist abuse after Brexit vote | UK news | The Guardian
  54. We still have love

wanderlust's mind

Today, I want to tell you all a little bit about what’s been going on in my country, specifically the UK. You’ve no doubt heard about our current political situation – after a massive country(ies) wide referendum, the UK has voted to leave the European Union – and I was planning to write more about the political side of things and specifically my personal opinions about it. However, something happened today that made me decide I wanted to write more about the effects and the aftermath of the referendum first. So the politics will have to wait for now.

So what happened today?
Today, my mother and I went into town to do some shopping. Whilst we were there, we spontaneously started speaking in Spanish, just chatting about what we were buying and such. However, after about ten-fifteen minutes of that, as we were leaving the store, my mum said to…

View original post 1,442 more words

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Filed under Activism and Peace Work, Being and Feeling, Crimes & Atrocities, Headlines - News, Political affairs, Re-Blogs and Great Blogs, Social affairs, Welfare matters

Kindertransport

English: Memorial of Nicholas Winton, the savi...

English: Memorial of Nicholas Winton, the saviour of 669 jewish children from former Czechoslovakia; located in Prague Main railway station, installed 2009-SEP-01, sculptor Flor Kent (her other sculpture “Für Das Kind Kindertransport Memorial” was installed in the Liverpool Street station, September 2003) Česky: Památník sira Nicholase Wintona na pražském hlavním nádraží, odhalený při příležitosti vypravení „Winton Train“ 1. září 2009, sochařka Flor Kentová (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In 1938 and 1939, the Kindertransport occurred — a movement to bring thousands of Jewish children out of Nazi occupied territories to safety in Great Britain. These children came without their parents, almost always without a knowledge of English, and also little experience with English culture. They came to a new family, a new country, and a new life. Approximately 250 of these children were sponsored by Christadelphians. They came and lived in houses with Christadelphian families, or lived in hostels that the Christadelphians had started. So often the Holocaust is considered in terms of statistics — how many perished and how many were affected. Yet it is often the individual stories that provide the most powerful human connection and the opportunity to learn. Rather than focus on the statistics, this book examines the experiences of these people, who came to England as children, and lived with Christadelphians.

Ten of the former Jewish refugees, and their families, were contacted and collaborated in this effort to bring about this first volume. These are their stories.

The book is available from the Christadelphian Office, the Thousand Oaks Christadelphian Library, and Amazon.com (for Kindle edition).

For more information, visit iwaspartofthefamily.com

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Find also to read:

Information Wanted – Kindertransport

Christadelphians’ role in the rescue of Jewish children from Nazi Germany

Christadelphians, the Kindertransport, and Rescue from the Holocaust

January 27 – 70 years ago Not an end yet to genocide

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Filed under Crimes & Atrocities, History

Reflections on the Great War #1 100 years on

Today 11 November it is remembrance day for the worst tragedy that came over the world, war bringing many countries in agony.

In the 2014 August and November issues of the Christadelphian is spent some time to think about those awful years.
In the august issue brother Roger Long looked also at the “Signs of the times” Nearer the exit?

Today in several countries there is an annual holiday honouring military veterans. At Veterans Day, also celebrated as Armistice Day, Remembrance Day or Poppy Day, the world remembers the anniversary of the signing of the Armistice that ended World War I.  At the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918 the guns of the Western Front fell silent after more than four years of continuous warfare, with the German signing of the Armistice. It is marked by parades and church services and in many places the flags of the country and of the union (Europe, Common Wealth, America or United States) are hung at half mast. A period of silence lasting one or two minutes may be held at 11am.

The British do have Remembrance Sunday on the second Sunday in November, the Sunday nearest to 11 November. Remembrance Sunday also sees special events and services relating to remembrance and was this year (2014) on the 9th of November.

The Christadelphian August 2014 issue with Reflections and Lessons from the Great War 1914-1918

The Christadelphian August 2014 issue with Reflections and Lessons from the Great War 1914-1918

 

100 years on

Reflections on the Great War

The First World War was one of the most important events of the twentieth century, shattering the international settlement of the previous century and leading almost inevitably to the Second World War.

The War brought serious challenges to the Christadelphian community, challenges reflected in the pages of The Christadelphian and Fraternal Visitor magazines. In this brief series, these will be considered from time to time.

“A bolt from the blue”

“The murder of the Archduke Francis Ferdinand and his Consort on June 28th, at Sarajevo, has proved to be the match the dropping of which has converted Europe into a ‘lake of fire’. It has come like a bolt from the blue …” (“Signs of the Times” – September 1914, The Christadelphian, page 451)

Franz Joseph I of Austria 1855

Franz Joseph I of Austria 1855 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

When the first news was received of the murder by Gavrilo Princip of Franz Ferdinand and his wife, it was not front page news. The Times newspaper reported it on page 7 very much as just another assassination in a Europe accustomed to periodic murders of kings and politicians. After all Tsar Alexander II of Russia had been killed by a bomb thrown by a Polish student in March 1881; the Austrian Emperor Franz Joseph’s wife, Elizabeth, had been stabbed to death boarding a lakeside steamer in Geneva by an anarchist in 1898 and the Russian Prime Minister Stolypin assassinated in a Kiev theatre in 1911, to name but a few. The main comment in the newspapers was about the extraordinary ill fortune of the House of Hapsburg: Franz Joseph’s brother Maximilian had died in an ill-fated attempt to become emperor of Mexico in 1867, his son Rudolf committed suicide at Mayerling in 1889, his wife had been murdered and now his nephew and heir and his wife had been shot dead in Sarajevo in yet another episode in the troubled history of the Balkans.

It is doubtful if many of the British public had ever heard of Sarajevo before and many people, including politicians, saw it as an unfortunate episode which might raise temperatures in a troubled area which had experienced two wars within the previous three years. However, those wars had been prevented from spreading by the intervention of the great powers, Austria-Hungary, Germany, Britain, France and Russia, and expectations in the initial days after the murders were that this new mini-crisis could also be resolved. No one in those first days and weeks thought that it would lead to a world war. Other crises involving the Powers had come and gone without leading to conflagration, so why should this one be any different?

Militarism and alliances

Of course, the Powers were all armed to the teeth and had been for some years; in January 1914 The Christadelphian noted the huge rise in the number of Dreadnought battleships across the Powers – up from 1 in 1905 to 125 in 1912 and 150 in 1913. The “Signs of the Times” column noted the “steady drift towards Armageddon” and that the nations were “angrier than ever”. But it also noted the general concern that money devoted to growing armies and navies was being wasted at a time of great social need. In those early months of 1914 there was no great sense of urgency, even amongst eagle-eyed surveyors of the world stage in the Christadelphian Office. Indeed an interesting observation from the Daily Chronicle quoted in February 1914’s magazine was that, “Never has Europe been more militarist or less warlike”. This comment reflected the widespread feeling that the very level of military preparedness made war less likely. The two great alliances, of Austria-Hungary and Germany on one hand and Britain, France and Russia on the other, seemed to cancel one another out and peace of a sort had prevailed ever since 1871 – a period of just over forty years. Whilst there were signs of troubled times ahead, in the spring of 1914 there was little awareness of the imminence of the disaster about to unfold or the millions of lives it would consume. People had become lulled into a false sense of security.

Watching world events

The Christadelphian magazines of those early months have a recognisable mixture of exposition, exhortation and other articles of general interest. There was much concern for the fledgling Jewish settlements in Palestine, then still under Turkish rule; Brother Frank Jannaway sent regular reports of his travels there and in neighbouring Bible lands. There was great concern for Jews being persistently mistreated in Russia, comments on events and matters of interest in other churches and the regular reports of ecclesial activities. Until September, after the war had started, the lecture titles recorded were a cross-section of issues, with few if any indicating an imminent world crisis.

So there is an interesting mix of news. In February 1914 aeroplanes were seen over Jerusalem for the first time; in March it was reported that the European Unity League was advocating an alliance of the states of Europe on an economic basis and that suggestions had been made that Jerusalem should be declared a neutral city. In April there was a report of some Suffragettes setting up their own women-only church; in May the visit of the King and Queen to Paris to celebrate the tenth anniversary of the Entente Cordiale alliance with France; in June an article bewailed the failure of clergymen in the established Church to uphold the authority of the scriptures, especially with regard to miracles.

The magazine reports were not entirely ignorant of the threats posed by the Powers’ large armies and navies. In April the “Signs of the Times” reported that there were rumours that some of the Powers might consider that a “preventative” war would be better than allowing their enemies to grow stronger and stronger; it also listed the huge armies of the time – Russia 1,700,000 men, Germany 870,000, France 714,000, Austria 360,000 and Italy 290,000. Relying on its navy, Britain mustered a mere 256,000. In June a letter raised the question of whether it would be wise to send a fresh petition to the British Parliament again to request exemption if conscription was introduced: the rather cautious response was that the time was not right for such an action, although the Lincoln Ecclesia had petitioned on the subject in 1913 and received responses from senior politicians including Asquith, Lloyd George and Winston Churchill.

The July “Signs of the Times”, probably written before the news of the assassination in Sarajevo broke, covered a diverse range of events – the crisis in Ireland over Home Rule; the Suffragette campaign which included planting a bomb behind the Coronation Chair in Westminster Abbey; oil exploration in Southern Persia; a suggestion from an Admiral Scott that air power and submarines would eventually make warships obsolete; references to a revolution in Albania and to collisions at sea. Even in August, the assassination only made an appearance as the third item in “Signs of the Times”, although the publication of the magazine at the beginning of the month and early requirements for copy may account for this.

The crisis everyone in Britain feared concerned Ireland, which was then entirely within the United Kingdom. A Home Rule Bill passed through the House of Commons in June 1914, but the Protestant northern counties of Ulster had been preparing for some years to resist if any attempt were made to force them into a united independent Ireland. Ulster Defence Volunteers openly marched and prepared to fight, with large numbers of guns being smuggled into the country. British Army officers stationed at the Curragh threatened to resign rather than be ordered to take action against the Protestant counties. Had the war not intervened, a civil war in Ireland would almost certainly have broken out.

The low priority given to the assassination in Sarajevo reflected the initial lack of alarm amongst the leaders of the Great Powers. The German Foreign Minister went off on July 5th on his honeymoon; the Kaiser set out the next day for his usual twenty-day summer cruise to Scandinavia; other leaders looked forward to time on holiday away from the troubles of the world. The British public planned whatever time they could get at the seaside or other holiday destinations, looking forward to August Bank Holiday, then on the first Monday in August.

A rapid escalation

All things continued much as before until July 24, when Austria-Hungary’s fierce ultimatum to Serbia, who it blamed for the assassination, set in train a rapid escalation. The Austrians had first secured the support of the Germans for this move, which made the involvement of Russia and France more likely. Within a week the mobilisation of the rival armies of Europe, unable to stand and watch their allies attacked or threatened, had brought Austria-Hungary and Germany into war with Russia and France. The invasion of Belgium as part of the German plan to defeat France quickly brought Britain into the war on August 4 and the last summer of the old order was overwhelmed by the earthquake which was the Great War.

There are lessons in all this for us. We too live in days when we have become accustomed to living with crises in different parts of the world. They form a constant backdrop to our lives. Scarcely a day goes by without a fresh report of trouble in the Middle East, whilst the Great Powers of our day posture and threaten much as they did a hundred years ago. So it is easy to be lulled into a false sense of security and to push beyond the horizon our expectation of the Second Coming and the final crises of this world which will precede it. The Lord warned us that his return would come suddenly “as a thief in the night”. In 1914, the world which then was disintegrated in the space of little more than a month from the assassination of Franz Ferdinand, serving as a warning of how quickly things change in God’s purpose. The lesson is clear and uncompromising:

“Watch therefore, for you do not know on what day your Lord is coming … therefore you also must be ready; for the Son of man is coming at an hour you do not expect … Lest he come suddenly and find you asleep.” (Matthew 24:42,44; Mark 13:36)

John Botten

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Continue reading: Reflections on the Great War #2

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The Christadelphian magazine reflects the teachings, beliefs and activities of the Christadelphians – groups of believers living in most countries in the world.

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Do you not yet know the Christadelphians?
Come to get to know more about the Christadelphians.Do find an overview of what Christadelphian people think, live and want to follow up.

Read more about them in :

  1. Who are the Christadelphians
  2. What are Brothers in Christ
  3. Two new encyclopaedic articles
  4. Review of the Christadelphians from some older articles

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Please find additional reading:

  1. All the war-propaganda, all the screaming and lies and hatred, comes invariably from people who are not fighting… George Orwell
  2. August 4, 1914 to be remembered
  3. 11 November, a day to remember #1 Until Industrialisation
  4. 11 November, a day to remember #2 From the Industrialisation
  5. 100° birthday of war and war tourism
  6. 1914 – 2014 preparations
  7. Liège 2014 remembering the Great War
  8. Mons 2014 remembering the Great War
  9. Friendship and Offer for the cause of democracy
  10. Juncker warns for possible new war

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  • Remembrance Day: Millions across the UK including London and Belfast to mark those lost (belfasttelegraph.co.uk)
    This weekend – Armistice weekend in the 1914 centenary year – London will have three rivers: water, people and poppies.
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    For the first time on any war memorial anywhere in the world, the names of former comrades, former allies and former enemies will be listed together, alphabetically, with no distinction of rank or country. President François Hollande will open the memorial. Both the Prime Minister David Cameron and the German Chancellor, Angela Merkel, were invited. Neither, sadly, will attend.
  • The History of Remembrance Poppies (serenataflowers.com)
    At this time of year it’s hard to miss those unmistakable red poppies adorning everyone’s lapels and buttonholes. Having become such an iconic symbol of the sacrifices made and the lives lost in past wars how did this simple little flower come to mean so much to so many?
  • World War One: Use our widget to search for anyone in your family or your street who died in The Great War (manchestereveningnews.co.uk)
    The last recorded death in the conflict from Greater Manchester was James Isherwood Bolton, of Belmont Road, Astley Bridge.He sadly lost his life on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918.James Arthur Parkes, of Meadow Bank, Chorlton, was the oldest casualty when he was killed on March 29, 1917, aged 67.

    And the youngest to die was 15-year-old Frederick Thorley Finucane, the son of Theatre and Emily Finucane, when he died on November 27 1914.

    The bloodiest day was on July 1, 1916, when 585 soldiers from Greater Manchester died in the Battle of the Somme.

  • Opinion: Echoes of Great War reverberate to this day (ww1.canada.com)
    If you had been in one of those cold, wet trenches on the Western Front, bracing yourself to go “over the top” into the face of machine-gun fire, how would you want future generations to honour your potential death?Well, having spent a lot of time between attacks listening to cries for help from No Man’s Land, you’d probably not be satisfied with occasional remembrances of your sacrifice.Rather, you’d want future generations to figure out what happened, with a view to making sure the Armageddon you were living through at least became the War To Make Wars a Lot Less Likely. And today – just three days shy of the 100th anniversary of Austria-Hungary declaring war on Serbia, starting the First World War – it’s fair to say this is a debt posterity hasn’t properly paid.
  • Arrivals: This week, Remembrance Day (thestar.com)
    Military expert Doyle has assembled 100 objects to tell the story of the Great War, beginning with the 1911 Graff and Stift Double Phaeton open car in which Archduke Ferdinand and his wife, Sophie, were travelling when they were assassinated, and ending with the Menin Gate in Ypres, Belgium, and other memorials that remember the war dead.
  • Today in History, Oct. 28 (rep-am.com)
    On Oct. 28, 1914, Yugoslav nationalist Gavrilo Princip, whose assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, sparked World War I, was sentenced in Sarajevo to 20 years’ imprisonment (he died in 1918); four conspirators were sentenced to death. (Princip escaped the death penalty because he was underage.)
  • Time Machine: Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria (1875-1914) (rosiepowell2000.typepad.com)
    The assassinations produced widespread shock across Europe. There was a great deal of initial sympathy toward Austria. Within two days, Austria-Hungary and its ally, Germany, advised Serbia that it should open an investigation on the assassination, but the Serbian government responded that the incident did not concern them. After conducting its own criminal investigation, Austro-Hungary issued what became known as the July Ultimatum, which listed demands made to Serbia regarding the assassinations within 48 hours. After receiving support from Russia, Serbia agreed to at least two out of ten demands. The government mobilized its troops and transported them by tramp steamers across the Danube River to the Austro-Hungarian at Temes-Kubin. Austro-Hungarian soldiers fired into the air to warn them off. On July 28, 1914; Austria-Hungary and its ally, Germany, declared war on Serbia. Under the Secret Treaty of 1892, Russia and France were obliged to mobilize their armies if any of the Triple Alliance (Germany, Austo-Hungary and Italy) mobilized. Russia’s mobilization completed full Austro-Hungarian and German mobilizations. Soon all the Great Powers, except Italy, had chosen sides. World War I had begun.
  • Speech: Remembrance Day (gov.uk)
    Ladies and gentlemen, we come here, of course, to pay our respects to all of the fallen and of the wounded in all conflicts over the last 100 years. 2014 also marked the 75th anniversary of the outbreak of WW2 and the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings, commemorated by World Leaders, including HM the Queen, in Normandy this summer. This spirit of courage, bravery and sacrifice continues to the present day. As we welcome home our returning troops from Afghanistan, we grieve for the 453 of them who were lost to that conflict. We also pay tribute to the Cambodian troops currently serving overseas in UN Peacekeeping operations in countries as far afield as Mali and Lebanon. We wish them success in their missions and a safe return home upon their completion.Today, as every day, we remember those who volunteered, served, fought, and died, all for the cause of freedom. We have with us today several veterans of these conflicts. We are grateful for your service. We thank you, and we salute you as we salute those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. We will remember them.

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Filed under Activism and Peace Work, History, Political affairs, World affairs