Tag Archives: CoViD-19 pandemic

MoonDay Musings: the magic of storytelling

In a certain way it is a shame, the tradition of telling about the past of the family, does not exist anymore.

Probably, for some time, the Boom generation is the last generation where the youngsters sat on the lap of their grandparents listening to those very interesting stories of the past as well as to the many fairytales and fables.
As kids we could dream about wonder tales involving marvellous elements and occurrences, bringing us in dreamland. Charles Perrault and the Brothers Grimm ( Jacob Ludwig Carl and Wilhelm Carl Grimm) , were daily food for many of the generations born before 1960, who also grew up with several fables or parables.

In many industrialised countries there is no time given anymore to public storytellers or to public poets .It would not be bad to have again a bearer of “old lore” (seanchas) or have again recitals by bards, to bring the past back to life.
We may not forget that by telling about the past we can learn for the future and find ways to strengthen ourselves.

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Additional reading

  1. To relive that what happened in the past
  2. Stories of the beginnings, and one Main book composed of four major sections
  3. The flood, floods and mythic flood stories 6 European myths
  4. Dia de Los Muertos – Day of the dead
  5. Allhallowtide with Halloween, All Saints’ Day and All Souls’ Day

Inner Journey Events Blog

Photo by Nong Vang on Unsplash

We learn history in many ways — from school textbooks, non-fiction scholarly works, novels, television, documentaries and films, the nightly news and more — and some of those sources may even be accurate. 

But what of cultural lore and traditions, and family history?

In the past, these stories were shared at family gatherings, at times of celebration such as festivals like Samhain and Bealtaine, but also on special days for individuals such as births, birthdays or naming days, weddings, and —yes — deaths, as families gathered to celebrate the life of a loved one who had passed. 

In ancient Irish traditions — and many other cultures and places with strong oral traditions — families, villages, clans and tribes honoured the role of the story teller.

These were known as the fílidh (pronounced fee-lee) in Druidic and Celtic traditions, poet-seers who learned hundred…

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Be it in May or September: Run the race

The last two academic years have been very weird with many restrictions. September is here again and soon it will be October, the month when everybody is back at work or back in school. Once more we faee a new academic and church year. Once more we are reminded we have work to do on this earth. We have our obligations and we have to strive to get some results in what we are supposed to do.

In Belgium, last year, sports were more a thing for one person on his own, because no group events were allowed. Everyone had to stay in isolation and contact sports were not allowed. The text underneath normally was to be published in May, when we had the underneath ‘prayer theme’ for the month, but we got somewhat behind with a lot of work, because other matters, like taking care of people, providing food to isolated people and help for those in need, certainly after the floods, required our attention.

In the Covid period it might not have been easy for many. Now it could well be that this year may be a year of transition, for becoming back to normal.

Jane Edwards has a look at what happened mostly in May. In her country that is the time the sun starts showing herself more and more attention is given to outside sports. She then thinks of the race which we have to finish.

Be it May or September, each day we are confronted with a lot of matters. Every day of the year, we have to get on and continue our way.

°°°

Run the race

When I was at school, the month of May meant only one thing…..
Practicing for Sports day.
Today, children are encouraged to just take part, and they are all winners. Helping others along the way to finish together.

When I was at school, it was all about the winning!
Who could run fastest.
Who could throw furthest.
Who could jump highest.

Winners were winners, and losers were just that – losers.
Winners received prizes, losers were scorned.

There were cheers, and plenty of boos.

I hated Sports day. Whilst I enjoyed hockey and netball – team games, I hated the one against one competition of Athletics – mainly because I was rubbish, and not really built to run!

We are told in the Bible in Hebrews 12 that we need to ‘run the race’ , but we are also told that ‘bodily exercise profits little’ in 1 Timothy 4v8 – which is correct?
Of course we need to exercise.
For our hearts and minds exercise is good, but too much can become an obsession – and take us away from other activities that matter.
So, what race do we need to run?

Of course, this is the race to the Kingdom. This race is much better than the ones I failed miserably at school. This race, (perhaps more apt to call it an Obstacle Course) makes everyone a winner!
It’s about getting to the finish line – some may reach that before others, but everyone has a chance to finish and win… and have help from others along the way.
And the prize – eternal life!
No boos, but cheers from the Heavenly Hosts.
As we watch our children on Sports Day, or think about exercise for ourselves, let us remember the most important race of our lives.

 

 

 

Dear Lord,
Please be with us as we run the race to your Kingdom.
Some of us may be slower through lack of faith, anxiety, and fatigue.
Give us the encouragement and strength needed to make it to the finish.
Please help us to help others to the end,
giving them encouragement as you have to us.
Amen

 

Jane Edwards

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Preceding

Race and Grace

The race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong

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Additional reading

  1. Life is like a ten-speed bike.
  2. The high calling of God in Christ Jesus
  3. We are redeemed; we are “bought with a price”
  4. Followers with deepening
  5. Troubles testing your faith and giving you patience and good prospects
  6. Matthew 20 Are you willing to work for Jesus?
  7. Today’s Thought “There is laid up for me the crown of righteousness” (May 27)
  8. Every athlete exercises self control
  9. Running the battle
  10. A race not to swift, nor a battle to the strong
  11. Run for the Everlasting Cure
  12. Atonement and the race been bought
  13. Being of good courage running the race

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Related

  1. “Fit In!”
  2. Just Keep Going by Bridget A. Thomas
  3. A Crown Beyond the Sun
  4. Running The Race
  5. Running The Race by Tara Randel
  6. Running This Race Called Life
  7. How do you stay strong in the midst of change
  8. ending well
  9. Leaning On The Father
  10. Running the Race of Holiness: DON’T give up
  11. Catching up to the Win
  12. Old and Heavy
  13. The Race
  14. It’s Friday…Run With An Eye For Nothing Less
  15. One Thing I Know
  16. With “Blinders” of Grace!
  17. The Surrendered Disciple!
  18. The Funneling Effect!
  19. With Reverence, Returning…
  20. Reawaken the Redeemed!
  21. Saved from Self’s Strainings!
  22. The Second Hand’s Moment!
  23. Sunday Morning 7/25: Unit 34, Session 4: Running the Race
  24. A Cloud of Witnesses
  25. The Fool’s Boundary!
  26. The Piper’s Promised Peace!
  27. Keep the Focus
  28. Choice Intersections!
  29. Faithful to the End
  30. Wholeness…in Him!
  31. Running the Race

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Healthcare Workers: Heroes of the modern world???

The true heroes, who are usually forgotten by society, are those who work for others without expecting anything in return. All over the world, we are fortunate to find such people volunteering for work that would otherwise be unaffordable and impossible to accomplish. Then there are the teachers and health workers, to whom society should give much more respect and recognition.

 

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Preceding

National Heroes Day Message of Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda

Your Nurse Marry

When I was young, I used to idolize a lot of characters in the movies I watched, especially those people who portrays act of kindness and heroism.

The COVid-19 pandemic that started in the year 2020 had made a drastic and devastating change in the lives of all people globally. The horrible effects of this virus spread abruptly from one country to another.

In today’s modern world, where new and innovative technologies are present and where new strains of unforeseen biological enemies arises, real heroes stood up and are continuously fighting the battle to help, care and protect all the people in world.

Medical facilities are continuously struggling to support all the people afflicted by the virus. Healthcare providers, nurses, allied health workers and other staff working in the hospitals are trying to offer the best and quality healthcare services needed. With full efforts, they devoted their time to give…

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National Heroes Day Message of Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda

Normally we consider a hero as someone who has done something brave, new, or good, and who is therefore greatly admired by a lot of people, but we have also the little heroes near us, people who are not known by others but have done something special for someone.

Let us also not forget those whose bravery or effort is not noticed or recognised and the many people in anonymity who save others

 

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Next:  Healthcare Workers: Heroes of the modern world???

Celebrity World Ph

As we remember today the greatness of our heroes who had a vision of a better, progressive, free, and independent nation, let us also celebrate our heroes of today who continue to strive for the betterment of our people and our country amid numerous challenges.

Let us recognize and honor our present-day heroes, those who continue to sacrifice their lives and safety for the welfare of our people.  These are our country’s frontliners who have the same quality of selfless devotion and unparalleled contribution to the national cause of keeping this thriving country healthy and strong amid our fight against COVID-19. They are our healthcare professionals and workers, policemen and members of the armed forces, teachers, the utility staff, supermarket staff, food and cargo delivery drivers, fisherfolk and farmers, market vendors, journalists, local and national government employees who continue to courageously perform their duties to provide essential services to our…

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Days Are Not So Dreary Now

 

BowmanAuthor and Writer/Editor

Days are not so dreary now.

Dare we hope for a new tomorrow?

Another day that teaches us how

To live, love, express our sorrow

For what we have all been through.

How has the Pandemic affected you?

No one was left unscathed.

We all knew hardship and pain.

Our lives were interrupted with waves

Of loss, confusion, fear, blame

When there was no enemy to stand up to.

How can we ever know who?

So, we must be strong.

We must never look back.

Somehow, we’ll get past the wrongs

And find the courage we lack.

The virus still thrives.

How do we go on with our lives?

We move forward as we have always done.

We pray to our Deity as in the past when we have won!

–Deborah A. Bowman

A New Dawn is Coming

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Concern about the impact over time of Catholic livestreamed Masses

Many religious groups all over the world avoided their members having too much contact with other people and therefore chose to have their religious services online.

As the world fought to contain the spread of CoViD-19, or the coronavirus, in several countries Catholics have been dismayed that public Masses had been cancelled in a large portion of their country, as have weddings, baptisms, first Communions and confirmations. To be deprived of the Holy Eucharist is a terrible blow to Catholics.

While televised and online liturgies were a blessing for many, early in the pandemic and continue to provide benefits for parish ministries, some pastors who spoke with the National Catholic Register expressed concern about the impact over time.

Parishioners sit during Sunday Mass at St. Augustine Catholic Church on August 15, 2021 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Parishioners wore face coverings during Mass as part of COVID-19 protocols inside the historic church which is recognized as the oldest Black Catholic parish in the country.
Parishioners sit during Sunday Mass at St. Augustine Catholic Church on August 15, 2021 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Parishioners wore face coverings during Mass as part of COVID-19 protocols inside the historic church which is recognized as the oldest Black Catholic parish in the country. (photo: Mario Tama / Getty)

During COVID times, livestreamed Masses have been a blessing to many.

And whether the new Delta variant spikes or fizzles in the coming weeks, coronavirus has already changed many Catholic parishes in the United States.

In the United States of America, like in more Southern countries, much more people still want to go to mass. In Belgium we do find lots of people who are baptised in the Roman Catholic Church, but really do not believe so much, but are only member of that church out of tradition and because they want to have those celebrations of the first and second communion. The state television still keeps screening Roman masses, which made that in coronatime more people could find a church service on television. For other religious groups it was totally different. Several groups tried to organise services on the net, via Zoom or other social media.

In any case, what we could see at the Christadelphian meetings on the net, was that we had more people present at such service than at a real-life service. Providing livestreamed church services or Masses for those who cannot attend in person, due to health concerns and other serious reasons, is likely to remain a mainstay on Christadelphian but also on Catholic worship for some time.

But according to Father Jeffrey Kirby

The virus emergency not only changed the way the parish communicates with parishioners, it has even led it to unexpectedly develop a second constituency, as far-flung as California to the west and Ireland to the east.

Naturally, we all do know that there is No Substitute for The Real Thing.

Please read more how some American Catholic Churches managed the streaming of their services: Virus-Prodded Online Masses Have Changed Many Catholic Parishes — Are They Keeping Some Catholics From Returning to Church?

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Preventable: The Inside Story of How Leadership Failures, Politics, and Selfishness Doomed the U.S. Coronavirus Response Book Review

Donald Trump is the guilty one that America was and is still so much caught in the Corona crisis. In case he would not have minimalised this “Chinese” disease and would have given the right advice to the American citizens, a lot of deaths, suffering and sorrow could have been avoided.

Writergurlny

Hindsight is always 2020. The question we have to ask ourselves, is when the same issue comes up, is the past repeated or do we truly learn from our errors?

Andy Slavitt has spent many years within the world of healthcare. His new book, Preventable: The Inside Story of How Leadership Failures, Politics, and Selfishness Doomed the U.S. Coronavirus Response, was published in June. It documents the time he spent in the last Presidential administration and the missteps that led to more than half a million Americans dead from Covid-19. Speaking to government officials, politicians on all sides of the spectrum, and medical professionals, he talks about in detail what went wrong and what could have been done to save lives.

As I got further into the narrative, I was getting angry. The United States is one of the wealthiest nations in the world. While there was no…

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Should all medical research be regarded as ‘untrustworthy’?

The middle of the Covid-19 pandemic is not an auspicious moment to cast doubt upon the reliability of scientific research. However, writing in a BMJ blog, Richard Smith, editor of The BMJ until 2004, launched a withering attack, saying that the system is riddled with fraudulent studies.

“ It may be time to move from assuming that research has been honestly conducted and reported to assuming it to be untrustworthy until there is some evidence to the contrary,”

he says. Dr Smith does not mention the pandemic but others are sure to raise questions about research into Covid-19.

Michael Cook

> Covid-19: we’re in the thick of it now. But who decides when it ends?

> Should all medical research be regarded as ‘untrustworthy’?

by Michael Cook

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Can China Become A Super-Power

 

Political And Developmental Thoughts

Throughout history, many superpowers that dominated the world politically and economically came and left, the Roman empire, the Byzantine empire, the Umayyad empire, the Abbasid empire, the Mongol empire, the British empire. In today’s world, the hegemon that can be said is the world power that dominates the world not only politically and economically, but also culturally such as by movies, media, music and literature is the United States. 

The United States became the new superpower after world war 1 when the British Empire lost that position due to the economic and political damage the war had cost. The Americans filled that space by entering and ending the war, helping Europe recover by financing projects to rebuild war-torn Europe, and spreading its muscle around the world.

Today many believe that in the 21st century the world will experience another…

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