Benefits of Positive Thinking

How often do we hear ‘it is all in the mind‘? In a certain way we should find the truth in it that we ourselves do have a lot in our own hands by adjusting our own mind and making the right choices.

Everything in life for ourselves depend how we look at it ourselves and how we want to tackle it ourselves.

Once born and being in this world we have to face many challenges. When growing up we come to understand those opportunities in front of us demand us to make the choice either to be in this world but not part of it, or to prefer to do like most of the human beings and to be taken by the mainstream, putting aside the own personality to be part of the masses.
The majority does not want to see many things, but the positive person does not have close his eyes for the bad things that happen. Those can be challenged with a positive outlook. Instead of avoiding or ignoring the bad things, we should involve ourselves making the most of potentially bad situations, trying to see the best in other people, and viewing ourself and our abilities in a positive light. We should stimulate others also to put on the right glasses,which colour this world as a rainbow, with many various colours and brightnesses.

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To take in mind:
  • give yourself and the other adequate credit for successful outcomes, when good things happen
  • do not blame outside forces for bad outcomes, but be realistic and knowing that not always one person has to be blamed and that everything can overcome
  • blaming yourself for events outside of your control makes no sense
  • do not take unfortunate events as a persistent part of your life
  • try to see the positiveness in everything
  • belief in yourself
  • belief and trust those around you
  • always stay realistic
  • always keep moving forward
  • do not stay with your thought in the past
  • put the bad things behind you
Remember:
  1. Positive Thinkers Cope Better With Stress
  2. Optimism Can Improve Your Immunity
  3. Positive Thinking Is Good for Your Health
  4. It Can Make You More Resilient

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  • Pump Up Your Happiness by Strength-Training Your Emotions (psychologytoday.com)
    Frustrated because you can’t get what you want? Has someone turned you down for a date, a work request, or just a favor? It can get pretty annoying if not breakdown-worthy for you to be blocked from one of your goals, either large or small. Fortunately, by applying these evidence-based tools of emotional strength training, you can turn down your stress meter and make the best out of bad situations.

    The cornerstone of emotional strength training is cognitive therapy, in which clients seeking to overcome depression, anxiety, or problems in relationships build mental toughness by recognizing their triggers and then turning off the switch that would normally lead them to meltdown. However, it’s not necessary to have a diagnosable condition in order to apply its basic principles to improve your own ability to tolerate life’s many annoyances and dilemmas.

  • Swimming in a Rainbow (socialbridge.wordpress.com)
    I thought of the inspirational words of Christy Brown, so full of hope, that my mother used to quote and often sent to me when she knew I was troubled about something:

    And there are rainbows

    There are and there always will be rainbows.  Be sure you appreciate them!

  • Emotional resilience: it’s the armour you need for modern life (telegraph.co.uk)
    Zen-like poses and deep breathing are no longer relics of the New Age. Instead, they’re being practised by today’s business leaders, celebrities and politicians.
    +
    “Emotional resilience” is more hard-hitting than many of the other methods promising to keep us cool, calm and collected. Originally developed to help victims of natural disasters and massacres cope with catastrophe, it’s reached our shores and is slowly infiltrating offices, schools and communities.
  • Optimist Or Pessimist? Brain Scans Show Positive And Negative People Really Do Think Differently (medicaldaily.com)
    Some optimists will believe anything they hear, read or see as long as it goes along with their positive viewpoints on life. Granted this is probably a bit of an extreme, but it is feasible that an optimist can be taken advantage of because they wish to believe in the good they choose to see in everyone. This can lead to trouble if the optimist finds themselves in the wrong situation where their unwavering positivity meets with inevitable negativity that does exist in the world.
    +
    While the optimist generally believes in the positive and favorable aspects of life, the realist will sometimes disagree taking the stance that we live in an unpredictable world that can be as bad as it is good. While the optimist realizes that there are situations, people, and incidents that are by definition bad, they tend to focus on what positive elements can be taken from those incidents. The realist will usually acknowledge (and accept) those positive elements but they will also focus on why bad things happen, i.e. – there are bad people in the world/stuff happens/life isn’t perfect, etc.
    “It’s the first time we’ve been able to find a brain marker that really distinguishes negative thinkers from positive thinkers,” Dr. Jason Moser, lead author and a researcher at Michigan State University, said in press release.

    The new study, which is published in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology, sought to investigate the difference between positive and negative brains by asking 71 female volunteers to put a positive “spin” on graphic images. For example, participants would be shown an image of a man holding a knife to a woman’s throat and asked to assign a better outcome, such as the woman breaking free and escaping. Moser and colleagues also conducted individual interviews to determine whether subjects were more likely to be positive or negative in everyday life.

    By monitoring each subject’s brain profile throughout the experiment, the team discovered that negative participants displayed much more activity compared to those with an overall positive attitude. “The worriers actually showed a paradoxical backfiring effect in their brains when asked to decrease their negative emotions,” Moser said. “This suggests they have a really hard time putting a positive spin on difficult situations and actually make their negative emotions worse even when they are asked to think positively.”

  • How Optimism Can Be Learned (psychologytoday.com)
    Optimism, it turns out, isn’t just defined as the tendency to expect things to turn out better than probability predicts, nor is pessimism defined only as the tendency to expect things to turn out more poorly. Both terms are also used to describe the way we think about the causes of adversity, pessimism in particular being defined as the tendency to think about them in a way that makes us feel powerless. A pessimistic self-explanatory style, then, describes the tendency to attribute the causes of adversity to forces that are internal (“This is all my fault”), universal (“This affects absolutely everything”), and immutable (“This isn’t changeable”).
  • The Successful Optimist (entrepreneur.com)
    Optimists make more money and are more loyal.
    The optimist with high reality testing is a gold mine.
    Pessimists are more accurate about reality than optimists.
    There is nothing wrong with being a pessimist.
    Pessimists are more likely to become depressed than their optimistic counterparts.
    Optimists keep moving forward because they believe there are options.
  • Optimism, Pessimism, and Realism (hayeskaufman.wordpress.com)
    While the optimist generally believes in the positive and favorable aspects of life, the realist will sometimes disagree taking the stance that we live in an unpredictable world that can be as bad as it is good. While the optimist realizes that there are situations, people, and incidents that are by definition bad, they tend to focus on what positive elements can be taken from those incidents. The realist will usually acknowledge (and accept) those positive elements but they will also focus on why bad things happen, i.e. – there are bad people in the world/stuff happens/life isn’t perfect, etc.
  • An easy way to change how you think (the1bigthing.com)
    In the past 15 years Psychologists have turned their attention to what makes us happy in life. The research is loud and clear, your thinking has a huge impact on this. This post looks at what the research shows is ‘good’ thinking, what is not and shows an easy way to change how you think.
  • Learned optimism personal_transformation3 (slideshare.net)
  • Which one is better: Optimist or pessimist? (umsenglish2011.wordpress.com)
    Human personality traits can be inherited and learned. Nativists believe personality traits are inherited and empiricists believe personality traits are experienced.
    Both nativists and empiricists still argue whether personality traitsare inherited or experienced.
    +

    Being optimists are also taught in religion. For instance Islam, of course, our religion taught us to be optimists.
    As moslems, we are also taught that being positive can have big impact on our body and longevity.
    It has being said that positive thinking is not only broader our future but also prolong our lifespan. It is self-evident that being positive is not only for our health and well-being but also for our achievement in life.

    Finally, what should we choose? Either way could be disappointed depends on yourself.
    Then, I recommend you to be an optimist person because some researches, even our religion,
    have shown that being positive can reduce stress, increased immune system, prolong your life,
    and above all the very quality of your life.

Motivation & Inspiration

You have probably had someone tell you to “look on the bright side” or to “see the cup as half full.” Chances are good that the people who make these comments are positive thinkers. Researchers are finding more and more evidence pointing to the many benefits of optimism and positive thinking.Image

Such findings suggest that not only are positive thinkers healthier and less stressed, they also have greater overall well-being. Even if positive thinking does not come naturally to you, there are plenty of great reasons to start cultivating affirmative thoughts and minimizing negative self-talk.

Positive Thinkers Cope Better With Stress

When faced with stressful situations, positive thinkers cope more effectively than pessimists. In one study, researchers found that when optimists encounter a disappointment (such as not getting a job or promotion) they are more likely to focus on things they can do to resolve the situation. Rather than…

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3 responses to “Benefits of Positive Thinking

  1. Pingback: Subcutaneous power for humanity 4 Not crossing borders of friendship | Marcus' s Space

  2. Pingback: Subcutaneous power for humanity 4 Not crossing borders of friendship | Marcus' s Space

  3. Pingback: Facing our existence every day | From guestwriters

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