Tag Archives: World Health Organization (WHO)

CoViD-19 warnings

There were and still are many governments that do not see yet or do not yet understand the severity of the current coronavirus spread.

We know by now lots of people shall have seen warnings in social media and on their television screen.

There are loads of video’s to warn the public. Underneath we present a video from Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell and one short animated video from Stanford Medicine, which has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies and here illustrates how the novel coronavirus — the virus that causes the respiratory disease COVID-19 — is transmitted among people and how transmission can be prevented.

As the world copes with the impact of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, we know that several people, though bombarded with lots of information from their television channels but also from social media and national and local press, do not know any more what to believe or  have a lot of questions about what it means for them and the people they care about.

We advise all our readers to carefully follow the advice of their local governments but also to see what is going on globally, checking the state television channels and the World Health Organization. We all best can avoid as much as possible to have contact with other people, therefore distancing is essential.

Spreading primarily through droplets of saliva or discharge from the nose when an infected person coughs or sneezes, it’s important that people also practice respiratory etiquette (for example, by coughing into a flexed elbow) and when speaking to each other keep a reasonable distance, preferable of more than one meter (= 3 feet; but better more or best 1,5 meter). If you are too close, you can breathe in the invisible droplets, including the COVID-19 virus if the person coughing has the disease.

Another problem with viruses is that they can transmit when infected people have come in contact with objects. Hands touch many surfaces and can pick up viruses. Once contaminated, hands can transfer the virus to the eyes, nose or mouth. From there, the virus can enter the person’s body and can make him or her sick.

Also in our community we love to hug and give kisses and everywhere when meeting or saying good bye hands are given. But for the moment we better live that aside and better salute or give elbows or feet.

What to do

To protect yourself and others from the new coronavirus (Covid-19), you should apply the following hygiene measures:

  • • If you have flu-like symptoms, stay at home.
  • • Wash your hands regularly with soap and water.
  • • Sneeze and blow your nose in a tissue handkerchief. Use each tissue only once and throw it away immediately in a covered rubbish bin.
  • • You don’t have a tissue? Sneeze or cough into your elbow.

 

Help us slow down the spread of the virus:

  • 1. Stay at home as much as possible
  • 2. Avoid shaking hands, kissing or hugging each other.
  • 3. Watch out for those most at risk, i.e. people over 65 years of age, people with diabetes, heart, lung or kidney disease, and people with weakened immune systems, among others.
  • 4. Contact between children and the elderly is not recommended. Children do not get seriously ill from the coronavirus but they can spread it easily.
  • 5. Keep enough distance (1.5 metres) when outdoors.

Stay informed and follow advice given by your healthcare provider

Stay informed on the latest developments about COVID-19. Follow advice given by your healthcare provider, your national and local public health authority or your employer on how to protect yourself and others from COVID-19.

Why?

National and local authorities will have the most up to date information on whether COVID-19 is spreading in your area. They are best placed to advise on what people in your area should be doing to protect themselves.

°°°

At Stanford Medicine, our highest priority is the safety of our patients, health care workers and our community. We follow protocols recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and we will continue to update our institutional guidelines and processes to respond to this evolving situation.

For more information, please visit https://med.stanford.edu/covid19.html

!!

 

!!

Please find also to read:

  1. Using fears of the deadly coronavirus
  2. Europe in Chaos for a Pandemic
  3. Making deeper cuts than some terrorist attacks of the near past
  4. The unseen enemy

+++

Normally (because of so many negative reactions from the writers of such linked articles) we had decided not any more to show related articles, but in these circumstances, we would like to make an exception and again show you some other articles which might be interesting to read.

Related

  1. Social media firms ‘morally responsible for tackling Covid-19 misinformation’
  2. COVID-19: Ex-Presdient Jonathan calls for action,solidarity and patriotism
  3. BetaNews: Facebook is doing more to promote reliable information about coronavirus
  4. Guest post: To control or be controlled by the coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19)?
  5. Doctor Explains How to Safely Bring Groceries and Take Out Food Into Your Home
  6. Your Strategy During The Coronavirus
  7. Seven top tips to keep you motivated while you’re working from home
  8. Coronavirus: a tale of two states
  9. What is a coronavirus antibody test and how does the home test work?
  10. Coronavirus live updates: COVID-19 cases surge past 3,400, deaths at 35 in Canada
  11. Chinese Coronavirus in Kashmir: 152 people with undisclosed foreign travel history traced by Srinagar Control Room, put under quarantine
  12. It’s good to talk. But sometimes it’s easier to write, text, email or video call
  13. I might have already had Covid-19
  14. Pandemic life

13 Comments

Filed under Activism and Peace Work, Announcement, Headlines - News, Health affairs, Lifestyle, Pictures of the World, Video, World affairs

Positive – Negative being positive, negative or positive

Making Positive Positive: A Song of Hope for PLWHAs

When is positive negative
Or right wrong?
It is when living positive

I am living positive:
Now, more responsibly
I take responsibility for all my actions;
My life in my hands
I choose life over death
Wellness over sickness

I am a living ‘positive’
Now, more rightly, living and doing
Surrounded by all that is positive
I make the best of now
Enjoy this moment, one at a time

I am overcoming positive
With gratitude for everyday mercies
Finding and enjoying beauty and bounties, abound about:
the smile of a child; the chirps of the birds
the swinging music of the street trees;

I am positive; HIV positive
I am a living witness; a survivor of the scourge
I am living, I am positive
Positively positive

I am a HIV survivor
Beyond the put down of virus
Above societal stigma
I am living, I live
Making positive, positive

People living with hiv aids

ifedayo oshin

Ifedayo Oshin from Ondo, Nigeria,  believes in life and living it well and writes on all issues that affect humanity.

World map of travel and residence restrictions...

World map of travel and residence restrictions against people living with HIV/AIDS. blue: no specific entry and regulation targetting people with HIV/AIDS. orange: information is contradictory, restrictions are possible. red: entry and residency restrictions confirmed. gray: no information on the situation in the country. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

+++

  • Is HIV/AIDS disability? (times.co.zm)
    If we take condition as a point of identification we can safely say may be they are also disabled because people living with HIV/ AIDS are at high risk of becoming disabled permanently or episodic basis as a result of being HIV/AIDS positive.
    However, our society negative attitude against people living with HIV/AIDS may be change of this declaration is made because relatives spent a lot of money in trying to find a cure for the loved one but if the World Health Organization (WHO) publicly declare that the condition for people living with HIV/AIDS is permanent like any other conditions attitudes will change and stigma reduced.
    People living with HIV/AIDS end up using crutches or wheel chairs as the disease prolong the fact that many of us we have seen within our families or communities so calling them disabled would not change anything but open the closed door and remove force hopes created by society that one day the condition will change for better
    This “cross cutting of disability” principle implies the responsibility to integrate disability issues in the main stream of health policies and practice of all Government ministries rather than handling disability as a matter of social welfare sector or charity but as a developmental agenda with focus on promoting inclusive approach.
  • Correlates of Social Exclusion and Negative Labeling and Devaluation of People Living with HIV/AIDS in Rural Settings: Evidence from a General Household Survey in Zambézia Province, Mozambique (plosone.org)
    A 4-point increase in knowledge about HIV transmission was associated with more than a 3 unit decrease in NLD and SoE stigma scores (p<0.001). Given HIV transmission knowledge, a 25-point increase in legal rights certitude was associated with a 4.62 unit drop in NLD stigma (p<0.001); we did not detect an association between legal rights certitude and SoE stigma. Knowing at least one HIV positive person was associated with lower SoE (−3.17, 95% CI: −5.78, −0.56); no association with NLD (p = 0.1) was detected. ART efficacy belief was associated with higher NLD and lower SoE (2.90 increase and 6.94 decrease, respectively; p≤0.001)
  • Guyana not on track to close AIDS resource gap by 2015 – National AIDS Committee (guyanatimesgy.com)

    The National AIDS Committee (NAC) said Guyana is not on track to close the AIDS resource gap by 2015, despite prolonged calls for the government to plan for the scaling down by donors.

    NAC in its World AIDS Day statement said it is still awaiting the release of a report emanating from consultations organised by the Health Ministry, the National AIDS Progamme Secretariat and UNAIDS on this issue.

    The NAC said that such findings or recommendations (in the report) could contribute to innovative thinking, not only around new sources of funding, but on how best to reduce and/or retain the HIV qualified and committed personnel, either on special and/or normal contracts.

     

  • Over 67,000 HIV positive persons receiving free treatment in Benue State (vanguardngr.com)
    Over 67,000 People Living with HIV/AIDS, PLWHAS are currently receiving free treatment and care in designated centers established by the Benue state government.
    +
    Dr. Abunku stressed that the renewed onslaught includes “increase awarenes of the general public on the benefit of HIV counseling and testing and anti-retroviral therapy as well as the increased intakes of HIV   and AIDS services and products in the communities which has greatly facilitated the achievements that have been recorded sor far.”
  • Africa’s HIV stigma threatens AIDS battle (thestar.com)
    It’s a scene oft repeated across sub-Saharan Africa, where young women account for a quarter of new HIV infections and where AIDS remains a devastating scourge. The problem is especially acute in southern nations like Mozambique, where 7 per cent of all teenage girls are HIV-positive. That number doubles to 15 per cent by age 25, according to a report by the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS released last week.
  • AIDS Orgs Commend Gov. Cuomo’s Move to Keep PLWHAs Housed & Fed (fngnutrition.ca)
  • Quality of Life of People Living with HIV/AIDS under the New Epidemic Characteristics in China and the Associated Factors (plosone.org)
    A cross-sectional study was performed in Liaoning Province. Sample size (800) was calculated based on the fatality rate and enlarged with consideration on the loss of response. Participants were sampled by tables of random numbers among all registered PLWHA. Questionnaires pertaining to quality of life (SF-36) and related factors (demographic characteristics, social support and network, HIV/AIDS awareness, and behavior factors) were distributed during December 2010-April 2011. 783 effective responses were obtained.
  • Arky: Oshin is back! (playingwithsid.blogspot.com)
    Did you watch Oshin the Japanese television drama growing up?. The story of seven-year old Oshin from an impoverished farming family sent to work as house maid caught the imagination of audience around the world.

Leave a comment

Filed under Being and Feeling, Poetry - Poems