Tag Archives: War

Fear for rebel groups and men

In this world, this system of things is coming closer to its end. We can see that by what is coming from the East and is entering our life.

Throughout history there always have been interesting people and human beings who wanted to be more powerful than others, even prepared to kill others to strengthen their power. We have many  great men in this world and can see the governors whose laws and policies determine the welfare of millions; the would-be world-rulers, the dictators and empire-builders, who have it in their power to plunge the globe into war.

Sennacherib.jpg

Sennacherib during his Babylonian war, relief from his palace in Nineveh

Think of Sennacherib and Nebuchadnezzar; think of Alexander, Napoleon, Hitler. Think of Nixon and Mao Tse-tung…think now of Putin, Obama, Kim Jong-un, and others…  {J.I. Packer, in his classic book entitled Knowing God}

Today lots of people are fearing the power of ISIS. Many also want to believe that it are Muslims who are the ones they have to fear. They do not come to see that those fighters and Islamic terrorists are not real Muslims and are defiling the Ummah or Muslim community and slop God’s Name through the mud.

Do you suppose that it is really these men who determine which way the world shall go?
Think again; for God is greater than the world’s great men. {J.I. Packer, in his classic book entitled Knowing God}

He

“brings the princes to nothing; He makes the rulers of the earth as vanity” (Isaiah 40:23).

Pictured here is former Chinese Chairman Mao Z...

Pictured here is former Chinese Chairman Mao Zedong announcing the founding of the People’s Republic of China on October 1 1949. Italiano: Immagine di Mao Tse-tung che proclama la nascita della Repubblica Popolare Cinese l’1 ottobre 1949 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

We should be well aware that at the end-times the religions shall go against each other, but that those who belong to the body of Christ, the believers in one God know that the ruler of this world shall go to fight hard against those who worship the only one True God, in the knowledge that their end will be near.

They may want to blind others and bring others to do lots of things which are against God’s wish. Therefore we should be very careful not to step in the booby trap, becoming overmanned by grief and hatred, taking on an attitude unworthy a follower of Christ.

All our hope should be on the return of Christ and on his heavenly Father Who is

“The only ruler of princes.” Behold your God indeed!

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Preceding:

Tears for Belgium

A darker and stranger place

The Greatest Fear

Bringers of agony, Trained in Belgium and Syria

You might be an extrimist if …

Against cruelty in this world

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Filed under Crimes & Atrocities, Lifestyle, Political affairs, Religious affairs, Welfare matters

A darker and stranger place

world turning into a darker and stranger place than any of us could want.

Somewhere = always war + threat of an act of terrorism + woman or child in peril.
devastating tsunamis, hurricanes + earthquakes.

is it naïve to try to shine a little light into the darkness?

a little candle held up to the dark of night, trying to illuminate the hope for a better world where we all respect and care for each other.

Karavansara

Some people I love live in Bruxelles.
As some live in Paris, in Ankara, in New York.
In London, in Rome.
I have friends and loved ones in a number of places, all over the globe – I am lucky like that. And as the situation grows more confused, I sometimes wonder if I am doing anything to help. Then, about fifteen minutes ago, I read this…

    Year by year, the world is turning into a darker and stranger place than any of us could want.
Somewhere, there is always a war.
Somewhere, there is always the threat of an act of terrorism.
Somewhere, there is always a woman or a child in peril.
Nature itself delivers devastating tsunamis, hurricanes and earthquakes.
In the light of this onslaught of shadows, is it naïve to try to shine a little light into the darkness? After all, these stories are only…

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Filed under Crimes & Atrocities, Re-Blogs and Great Blogs, World affairs

Remain lovingly = No path for softies

BZN Liefdevol blijven

Remain lovingly. No path for softies.

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David Grégoire Van Reybrouck Flemish Belgian author who writes historical fiction, literary non-fiction, novels, poetry, plays and academic texts. He has received several Dutch literary prizes, including AKO Literature Prize (2010) and Libris History Prize.

Jens Stoltenberg February 2015.jpg

Jens Stoltenberg

One hears language of war here and there as a reaction to acts of terror worldwide. In his opinion column David Van Reybrouck pleads for other forms of resoluteness than war language. Immediately after the attacks in Norway the Prime Minister Stoltenberg pleaded frankly for

“more democracy, more openness, more participation“.

In this climate of violence we need this connective thinking. Violence starts indeed  where people allow themselves to be played off against each other and point at innocent people.

Only light can conquer darkness.
Last november ,’Hart boven Hard‘ (Heart above Hard) and other similar organisations have organised simultaneous “silent wakes”   in various towns in solidarity with all the victims of terror attacks and wars. Under the common motto “together against hate” the civil movement invites as many people as possible to make a gesture against violence, polarising and terrorism.
Also the youth brigade Tony! takes to the streets in order to commit hopeful attacks. In the autumn they drove through the city and projected connecting messages onto public buildings like the MAS. With this wildbeam action these young people offer a constructive counterweight. They choose for radical hope as a last freedom of the human being. The freedom to choose how we want to deal with the things thrown at us today.

An alternative for fear begins with …. YOU!
Every person who chooses resolutely every day to stay lovingly, to accept dialogue, to choose for encounter, knows that this is not an easy path to take. Resistance, disappointment, desperation are part of it. Resilience is a must. Notwithstanding this MWN summons – already for over 55 years – to choose this path. To keep trusting. Also when it becomes difficult. Because we keep believing in the silent force of many citizens who together keep delivering small , meaningful deeds. As a silent protest.

Dalailama1 20121014 4639.jpg

The present and 14th Dalai Lama Tenzin Gyatso

The Dalai Lama has spread a similar message :

“Violence is a reaction of shortsighted people that have lost the plot. At 81 I believe that violence cannot be solved by prayers or Governments. We have to create change at an individual level and then spread this to your neighbourhood and the society”.

BzN-Mov Without a Name-Logo_EN

BZN or MWN Who we are & What we do;

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Original Dutch Version /Nederlandse versie: Liefdevol blijven = Geen weg voor softies

 

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Additional reading

  1. Muslim Grooming (Rape) Gangs and Sharia
  2. When the wind blows hard on a tree
  3. Hope does not disappoint us
  4. If you do pray you shall not be disappointed

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Further reading

  1. ‘I try to keep my hate in check. If you can’t hate, you can’t love.’
  2. Resistance (1)
  3. Resistance (2)
  4. Defiance vs Resistance
  5. ‘Let’s pull this humongous tree by the root’
  6. Goal Setting: It’s the Little Things
  7. We are Yedikule!
  8. Tout inclusif
  9. Revolutionary Internationalism Makes a Comeback in Oakland
  10. Activist hunting
  11. Thoughtful Thursdays #115 Three Wishes
  12. Day 378: Waking Up To Revenge
  13. Shards
  14. I Feel Broken
  15. What It Looks Like to Be So Happy It Hurts
  16. F.L
  17. Raw Thoughts
  18. good people
  19. New Beginnings

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Filed under Activism and Peace Work, Crimes & Atrocities, Lifestyle, Movement Without a Name, Social affairs

Great things, Voice of God and terrors


“32 “For ask now of the days that are past, which were before thee, since the day that God created man upon the earth, and ask from the one side of heaven unto the other whether there hath been any such thing as this great thing is, or hath been heard like it? 33 Did ever people hear the voice of God speaking out of the midst of the fire, as thou hast heard, and live? 34 Or hath God deigned to go and take Him a nation from the midst of another nation by temptations, by signs, and by wonders, and by war, and by a mighty hand, and by a stretched out arm, and by great terrors, according to all that the LORD your God did for you in Egypt before your eyes? 35 Unto thee it was shown, that thou mightest know that the LORD He is God: there is none else besides Him. 36 Out of heaven He made thee to hear His voice, that He might instruct thee; and upon earth He showed thee His great fire, and thou heardest His words out of the midst of the fire.” (Deuteronomy 4:32-36 KJ21)

“Know therefore that the LORD thy God, He is God, the faithful God, who keepeth covenant and mercy with them that love Him and keep His commandments to a thousand generations,” (Deuteronomy 7:9 KJ21)

“And the LORD brought us forth out of Egypt with a mighty hand, and with an outstretched arm, and with great fearsomeness, and with signs and with wonders;” (Deuteronomy 26:8 KJ21)

“the great temptations which thine eyes have seen, the signs, and those great miracles.” (Deuteronomy 29:3 KJ21)

“Happy art thou, O Israel! Who is like unto thee, O people saved by the LORD, the shield of thy help, and who is the sword of thy excellency! And thine enemies shall be found liars unto thee, and thou shalt tread upon their high places.”” (Deuteronomy 33:29 KJ21)

“and in all that mighty hand, and in all the great terror which Moses showed in the sight of all Israel.” (Deuteronomy 34:12 KJ21)

“And I will stretch out My hand and smite Egypt with all My wonders which I will do in the midst thereof; and after that he will let you go.” (Exodus 3:20 KJ21)

“And I will harden Pharaoh’s heart, and multiply My signs and My wonders in the land of Egypt.” (Exodus 7:3 KJ21)

“”When Pharaoh shall speak unto you, saying, ‘Show a miracle for yourselves,’ then thou shalt say unto Aaron, ‘Take thy rod and cast it before Pharaoh, and it shall become a serpent.’”” (Exodus 7:9 KJ21)

“19 And the LORD spoke unto Moses, “Say unto Aaron, ‘Take thy rod and stretch out thine hand upon the waters of Egypt, upon their streams, upon their rivers, and upon their ponds, and upon all their pools of water, that they may become blood; and that there may be blood throughout all the land of Egypt, both in vessels of wood and in vessels of stone.’” 20 And Moses and Aaron did so, as the LORD commanded; and he lifted up the rod and smote the waters that were in the river, in the sight of Pharaoh and in the sight of his servants; and all the waters that were in the river were turned to blood. 21 And the fish that were in the river died; and the river stank, and the Egyptians could not drink of the water of the river; and there was blood throughout all the land of Egypt.” (Exodus 7:19-21 KJ21)

“2 Speak now in the ears of the people, and let every man borrow from his neighbor, and every woman from her neighbor, jewels of silver and jewels of gold.” 3 And the LORD gave the people favor in the sight of the Egyptians. Moreover the man Moses was very great in the land of Egypt in the sight of Pharaoh’s servants and in the sight of the people. 4  And Moses said, “Thus saith the LORD: ‘About midnight will I go out into the midst of Egypt;” (Exodus 11:2-4 KJ21)

“And the LORD said unto Moses, “Pharaoh shall not hearken unto you, that My wonders may be multiplied in the land of Egypt.”” (Exodus 11:9 KJ21)

“And the LORD said unto Moses, “How long will this people provoke Me? And how long will it be ere they believe Me for all the signs which I have shown among them?” (Numbers 14:11 KJ21)

“(I stood between the LORD and you at that time to show you the word of the LORD, for ye were afraid by reason of the fire and went not up into the mount), saying:” (Deuteronomy 5:5 KJ21)

“For who is there of all flesh that hath heard the voice of the living God speaking out of the midst of the fire, as we have, and lived?” (Deuteronomy 5:26 KJ21)

“the great temptations which thine eyes saw, and the signs, and the wonders, and the mighty hand, and the stretched out arm—whereby the LORD thy God brought thee out. So shall the LORD thy God do unto all the people of whom thou art afraid.” (Deuteronomy 7:19 KJ21)

“the great temptations which thine eyes have seen, the signs, and those great miracles.” (Deuteronomy 29:3 KJ21)

“10 and showedst signs and wonders upon Pharaoh and on all his servants and on all the people of his land. For Thou knewest that they dealt proudly against them. So didst Thou get Thee a name, as it is this day. 11 And Thou didst divide the sea before them, so that they went through the midst of the sea on the dry land; and their persecutors Thou threwest into the deep, as a stone into the mighty waters.” (Nehemiah 9:10-11 KJ21)

“yet Thou in Thy manifold mercies forsookest them not in the wilderness. The pillar of the cloud departed not from them by day, to lead them in the way; neither the pillar of fire by night, to show them light and the way wherein they should go.” (Nehemiah 9:19 KJ21)

“The pillars of heaven tremble, and are astonished at His reproof.” (Job 26:11 KJ21)

“3 The voice of the LORD is upon the waters; the God of glory thundereth; the LORD is upon many waters. 4 The voice of the LORD is powerful; the voice of the LORD is full of majesty.” (Psalms 29:3-4 KJ21)

“Marvelous things did He in the sight of their fathers, in the land of Egypt, in the field of Zoan.” (Psalms 78:12 KJ21)

“how He had wrought His signs in Egypt and His wonders in the field of Zoan,” (Psalms 78:43 KJ21)

“48 He gave up their cattle also to the hail, and their flocks to hot thunderbolts. 49 He cast upon them the fierceness of His anger, wrath, indignation, and trouble, by sending evil angels among them. 50 He made a path to His anger; He spared not their soul from death, but gave their life over to the pestilence, 51 and smote all the firstborn in Egypt, the chief of their strength in the tabernacles of Ham. 52 But He made His own people to go forth like sheep, and guided them in the wilderness like a flock. 53 And He led them on safely, so that they feared not; but the sea overwhelmed their enemies.” (Psalms 78:48-53 KJ21)

“They showed His signs among them, and wonders in the land of Ham.” (Psalms 105:27 KJ21)

“wondrous works in the land of Ham, and fearsome things by the Red Sea.” (Psalms 106:22 KJ21)

“20 who hast set signs and wonders in the land of Egypt even unto this day, and in Israel and among other men, and hast made Thee a name, as at this day; 21 and hast brought forth Thy people Israel out of the land of Egypt, with signs and with wonders, and with a strong hand and with an outstretched arm, and with great terror;” (Jeremiah 32:20-21 KJ21)

“And the sound of the cherubims’ wings was heard even to the outer court, as the voice of the Almighty God when He speaketh.” (Ezekiel 10:5 KJ21)

“6 on the day that I lifted up Mine hand unto them to bring them forth out of the land of Egypt into a land that I had espied for them, flowing with milk and honey, which is the glory of all lands, 7 then said I unto them: “Cast away every man of ye the abominations of his eyes, and defile not yourselves with the idols of Egypt: I am the LORD your God.” 8 But they rebelled against Me and would not hearken unto Me. They did not every man cast away the abominations of their eyes, neither did they forsake the idols of Egypt. “‘Then I said, “I will pour out My fury upon them, to accomplish My anger against them in the midst of the land of Egypt.” 9 But I wrought for My name’s sake, that it should not be polluted before the heathen among whom they were, in whose sight I made Myself known unto them in bringing them forth out of the land of Egypt.” (Ezekiel 20:6-9 KJ21)

“He brought them out after he had shown wonders and signs in the land of Egypt and in the Red Sea, and in the wilderness forty years.” (Acts 7:36 KJ21)

“For they themselves show of us what manner of entering in we had unto you, and how ye turned to God from idols to serve the living and true God,” (1 Thessalonians 1:9 KJ21)

“Humble yourselves therefore under the mighty hand of God, that He may exalt you in due time,” (1 Peter 5:6 KJ21)

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All Giza Pyramids in one shot. Русский: Все пи...

All Giza Pyramids in one shot. Русский: Все пирамиды Гизы на изображении. Español: Las Pirámides de Guiza (Egipto). Français : Les Pyramides de Gizeh (Egypte). Català: Les Piràmides de Giza, a Egipte. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Preceding:

Searching or overlooking God’s presence

Summerholiday season time to read the Bible

Holiday making and dreaming

Home-stayers and their to do list

Written by inspiration of God for our admonition, to whom it shall be imputed if they believe

Les épreuves, signes et prodiges de Dieu

Beproevende God heeft tekenen gegeven

Versuchungen, Zeichen, Wunder, Streit und eine mächtige Hand

The Aleppo Codex is a medieval manuscript of t...

The Aleppo Codex is a medieval manuscript of the Hebrew Bible (Tanakh), associated with Rabbi Aaron Ben Asher. The Masoretic scholars wrote it in the early 10th century, probably in Tiberias, Israel. It is in book form and contains the vowel points and grammar points (nikkudot) that specify the pronunciation of the ancient Hebrew letters to preserve the chanting tradition. It is perhaps the most historically important Hebrew manuscript in existence. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Additional reading

  1. God giving signs and producing wonders
  2. Written down in God’s Name
  3. The Almighty Lord God of gods King above all gods
  4. El-Shaddai God Almighty Who no-one may see and live
  5. Jehovah God Maker of the entire universe served by a well-trained army
  6. God’s will is that all sorts of men should be saved
  7. Scripture words written for our learning, given by inspiration of God for edification

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Filed under Quotations from Holy Scriptures, Religious affairs

Janice Brittain’s music version of In Flanders fields

Page 1 of the introduction from a limited edit...

Page 1 of the introduction from a limited edition book containing an illustrated poem, In Flanders Fields, 1921 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A beautiful poem by John McCrae, set to an original musical composition Janice Brittain wrote in 2013 and re-recorded this year for the 100th year anniversary of WWI.

 


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In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place: and in the sky
The larks still bravely singing fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.
We are the dead: Short days ago,
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved: and now we lie
In Flanders fields!Take up our quarrel with the foe
To you, from failing hands, we throw
The torch: be yours to hold it high
If ye break faith with us who die,
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fieldsLieutenant Colonel John McCrae*

 

For many English speaking countries poppies are a sign for death, but in Flanders the poppy is a sign of conquering life.
When the grass, weeds or flowers are taken away from a place the first thing which seems to come up and give colour again on the land is the poppy. Out of the gruesomeness it is there to give a nice vivid colour giving hope for what still shall come and giving proof that life is stronger than everything that wants to silence it.

Wreaths of artificial poppies used as a symbol...

Wreaths of artificial poppies used as a symbol of remembrance (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Filed under Poetry - Poems, Video

Remembrance isn’t only about those who fought, but also those who refused

Too often is not seen or forgotten how much more important it would be not to take up the guns? Those who did not want to go to war are often considered as cowards, but more often they should be considered as lovers of man. Out of love for the other creations we should not kill any other creature of God without any serious reason, like killing plants and animals for food.

We also should remember those strong lads who out of their believe in God and love for their fellow man, did not want to take up weapons and kept speaking against war.
No war today can ever be justified. Other ways should be able to be found to find a solution for the ongoing conflict.

Also we should respect more those who went to the battle field but were confronted with such horror and pain that their life broke, and that they had to escape from that horror to be able to stay a human being and not becoming an animal only willing to kill anything on its way. Much more thought should be given to those courageous men who were fractured by war-violence and got shell shock and post-traumatic stress disorder.

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  • Old remedy provides new treatment for veterans with PTSD (kdvr.com)
    It’s an ancient remedy, that’s become a new option in treating Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, or PTSD.  Instead of prescription drugs, a Front Range clinic is taking a more holistic approach to helping local veterans.
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    Volunteers say their services decrease pain, anxiety and depression, alleviate symptoms of PTSD and improve sleep.  And it doesn’t just help veterans.

    “My son has had PTSD and had trouble getting back into society, and we all live in the same house, and at times it’s like walking on egg shells,” said Deborah Bailey.  Both she and her son receive treatment at the clinic.

  • PTSD: A Marine Corps Veteran’s Battle and Victory (accidentvictimsalliance.com)
    “We are on the cusp of a wave of PTSD,” says Dr. Sandro Galea after presenting a 300-page Congress-sanctioned report earlier this year suggesting the Pentagon and VA are unprepared for the impending wave of post traumatic stress disorder among troops.
  • Federal legislation ignores PTSD toll on civilians (eurekalert.org)
    Purtle found that in federal legislation introduced explicitly to address PTSD, an overwhelming majority of the language – more than 90 percent of the mentions of PTSD in these bills – showed efforts were targeted exclusively at military personnel. More than 90 percent of mentions of PTSD in the bills were likewise intended to address consequences of combat exposure.

    This emphasis does not match with the frequency of PTSD in the U.S. population.

    “Although trauma and PTSD are serious issues affecting military populations, the raw number of people affected by PTSD includes substantially more civilians simply because the civilian population is so much larger,” said Purtle.

  • New method shows progress for veteran PTSD sufferers (peoplestrusttoronto.wordpress.com)
    They fight the enemy and witness death and destruction before returning home. But sadly, the mental effects of war don’t go away for many veterans who suffer from post traumatic stress disorder.

    Vía Veterans Today http://www.veteranstoday.com/2014/10/31/new-method-shows-progress-for-veteran-ptsd-sufferers/

  • Scots children as young as five blighted by post-traumatic stress disorder after suffering abuse or witnessing catastrophic events (dailyrecord.co.uk)
    “Acute external events such as accidents and natural disasters, a range of violence-related traumas such as domestic or community violence or abuse can cause this condition.

    “It is certainly more recognised now because of a higher awareness of PTSD.”

    Statistics from health boards who responded to our freedom of information requests for PTSD cases recorded in children since 2010 make grim reading.

    Children in Greater Glasgow, Lothian and Grampian are suffering the same psychological trauma seen in kids in war-torn Gaza.

    More than half of 15 to 18-year-olds in Gaza show signs of full or partial post-traumatic stress disorder after seeing dead bodies and witnessing heavy shelling.

    In Glasgow, two children aged under 10, 21 aged 11 to 15 and 15 aged 16 to 18 were found to have PTSD.

    In Grampian, nine children were diagnosed in 2010, eight in 2011 and 17 in 2012-13.

  • Doctor who treated Siegfried Sasson ‘pioneered’ anthropology (theguardian.com)
    William Rivers, the doctor who treated officers including Siegfried Sassoon for shell shock during the first world war, and who was memorably brought to life in Pat Barker’s Booker prize-winning Regeneration trilogy, was also one of the fathers of social anthropology, according to a new book which claims his work in the field was written out of history by subsequent academics.

    Rivers is best known for his work at Craiglockhart war hospital in 1917, where he treated soldiers including Sassoon and Wilfred Owen for the condition then known as shell shock, now referred to as post-traumatic stress disorder. Rivers pioneered a humane, “talking cure” for the soldiers, as opposed to electric-shock treatment.

  • Jailed Marine released (wgntv.com)
    Tahmooressi was staying in San Diego to get treatment for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder after serving two tours of duty in Afghanistan.

Stop Making Sense

RAF Veteran Harry Leslie Smith writes for The Guardian:

‘As an RAF veteran of the second world war I know that November is a cruel month for both remembering and forgetting the cost of armed conflict. During these past few days when the light grows dim, I have stumbled around London and remembered a time when, as a young man, I witnessed our capital face death from swarms of Nazi bomber planes.

In this day and age we like to impose uniformity on our past conflicts. We see them through a nostalgic lens of wartime propaganda films in which the hero gladly sacrifices his life for a green and pleasant land. But the past is not as simple or as clear-cut as our TV presenters like to suggest during Remembrance Sunday services. For every act of unique heroism we remember, we often forget or ignore all those who, because of…

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Filed under Activism and Peace Work, Being and Feeling, Health affairs, Re-Blogs and Great Blogs, Religious affairs, Social affairs, World affairs

Too Young To Fight?

Hate against some other nation or love to take revenge may bring people a long way from human sense.

After two great wars, where so many countries were involved and so much blood was shed, still lots of people do not realise how ridiculous it is to have so much lives being offered for showing the ‘right for power’. Still today we can see that in many countries war is still romanticized and lots of people do find it an honour to have their sons going to war. Today in this world we can still find lots of child soldiers, and when it is not for the right country people find it horrible, but when it is for the ‘right country’ or ‘the right cause’ people find them heroes.
For sure it has to do with some form of making value judgements about the rightness of the cause , by our twisted minds.

Today children are also often sold into a kind of modern-day slavery. In Raqqa, where poverty is rampant, Isis persuades parents to send their children to the camps in exchange for money, according to Abu Ibrahim Raqqawi, the pseudonym of a 22-year-old man who lived in Syria until recently. He is the founder of Raqqa is Being Slaughtered Silently, a Twitter account and Facebook page.

In Iraq’s Mosul, which was taken over by IS gunmen in June, IS has replaced physical-education classes in local schools with martial-arts classes. A teacher in the city told Bloomberg that IS militants explained that “they need Mosul’s students to be the future soldiers of the caliphate.” Another Mosul resident, named as Abu Rawan, said that his 13-year-old nephew had been recruited by IS militants, who had given him a gun.

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To remember:

Commonwealth Military Cemetery at Essex Farm, near Ypres, Belgium: grave of V.J. Strudwick, killed in action January 14, 1916 at age 15.

Joe Strudwick: 6’1”, in all probability adult sized and willing to enlist; he said he was 19 and they either believed him or looked the other way. => not the lone child soldier of the Great War
his age was discovered before he reached the battlefield and he was de-mobilized.

Older men more likely to question validity of a war, more likely to have family responsibilities and less likely to unquestioningly volunteer for combat.

Young men romanticize war, older men know better.

Perhaps as many as 250,000 child soldiers, those not old enough to officially enlist, saw combat during the First World War. Probably more than that are serving today in conflicts around the world.

The United Nations has strict rules on military service for those under 18 that all member states are expected to follow.

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  • Video: South Sudan’s child soldier problem (bbc.co.uk)
    Children in the world’s youngest country of South Sudan are being forced to fight on both sides of a bloody civil war.

    The United Nations estimates that there are 11,000 child soldiers in South Sudan, where there has been a lull in the fighting, as peace talks continue between government, and rebel forces.

  • Boko Haram Using Child-Soldiers , Women As Human Shields (newsdiaryonline.com)
    Nigerian troops are concerned about the use of women as human shields as well as children as child-soldiers by Boko Haram militants in their quest to weaken military operations. A top security source in the North-East disclosed that the terrorists recruit, rape and kill some of the young captives who are reluctant to join them in their dastardly acts. In most cases, children and teenagers are forced to be in the forefront in the battle against the Nigerian troops through ambushing and suicide bombing.
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    On several occasions the Nigerian military has captured  children who were forced to take up arms against the state with some of them behaving abnormally  due to indoctrination and inducement through the use of hard drugs.

    The security source said “we are being cautious in abiding by the rules of engagement even when we are aware that the militants recruit children for spying on us and pushing them to engage in hostilities against innocent citizens and the troops. “Most of the children, especially teenagers were recruited through abduction, kidnapping and enticement with money after which they undergo brainwashing and combat training. Those that are unwilling to cooperate are punished or summarily executed.”

  • You: Afghan Parliament approves draft law to ban recruitment of child soldiers (nation.com.pk)
    The endorsement of the draft law by Afghan lawmakers comes as numerous national and international organizations criticized the Afghan government over recruitment of child soldiers. The draft law was sent to the Afghan parliament by the ministry of justice of Afghanistan around two weeks ago. Consisting of seven articles, the law was endorsed by the majority during the general session after review by parliamentary commissions.

    The law strictly prohibits the recruitment of children in security agencies, with one to seven years of imprisonment on violation. The Afghan Government reconfirmed its commitment with the endorsement of a ‘Road Map Towards Compliance,’ in August this year which laid down 15 measures to fully implement an Action Plan signed with the United Nations in 2011.

  • Boko Haram using child-soldiers, women as human shields (dailypost.ng)
    “We have lost our men in the battle-field while we tried to avoid shooting children and teenagers who are forced to confront us. How do you expect us to arrest a child with a gun? Do we accord such an armed under-age combatant with the status of a child deserving of protection under the rule of engagement?

    “It may become inevitable that some collateral damages may be recorded if we get the order especially because Boko Haram elements were using civilians as human shields to continue to gain undue advantages in the current battle in the North East.

    “However, much as troops are determined to avoid collateral damage, it has become inevitable to be decisive with armed underage combatants and female suicide bombers with the situation degenerating by the day.

  • Britain’s child soldiers: should the enlistment age be raised? (theweek.co.uk)
    Campaigners are taking legal action over the terms of enlistment for minors in the British army, accusing the Ministry of Defence of “exploiting” young recruits.

    Child Soldiers International (CSI) is calling for a judicial review over what it calls “unethical and unlawful age discrimination”. Their lawyers argue that soldiers who enlist at 16 are forced to serve for longer under army rules.

    Teenagers cannot see active service until they are 18, but all soldiers must be available for deployment for four years. So a 16-year-old who joins the army cannot leave until that are 22.

    “These young soldiers will be forced to put their lives on the line against their will during those two extra years, all because of a decision they made at 16 and later regretted,” said CSI director Richard Clarke.

    The latest move by the campaign group has reignited the debate about the enlistment age in the UK and comes as an independent survey found that 78 per cent of people believe it should be raised. “There is overwhelming public support in this country for a minimum enlistment age of 18,” said Clarke.

    The UK is the only country in Europe and the only country among the permanent members of the UN Security Council to recruit 16-year-olds into its armed forces. It is also just one of 17 countries in the world to do so, alongside North Korea, Pakistan and Iran.

  • Isis Child Soldiers Used as Suicide Bombers and Human Shields (ibtimes.co.uk)
    Speaking to reporters at the U.N., he said the fighters “appeal” to some of the youngsters and that they have approved adept at “manipulating young men and children.” He explained that “they project an image of being victorious”.

    They impress upon the children the importance of fighting and dying for their faith. and offer the pledge that those who die in the fray will “go straight to heaven.”

    Not everyone is in favour of children going into battle. “What is striking for me is to meet mothers who [tell us], ‘We don’t know what to do,'” said Simonovic. “Our sons are volunteering and we can’t prevent it.”

    At the camps, the children who are barely bigger than AK47s, are taught how to fire and load weapons. According to Syria Deeply website, they are shown the best ways to behead someone, using dolls as practice.

    The effectiveness of child soldiers as fighters is obviously not as great as adults, so they are used in other ways. Chillingly, they have value as human shields and also to provide blood transfusions for Isis militants, according to Shelly Whitman, the executive director of the Roméo Dallaire Child Soldiers Initiative.

  • Five Year Old Fighters and Girls Sold as Slaves – Videos Show Disturbing Evidence of Life in the Islamic State (breitbart.com)
    Charlie Winter, a spokesman for anti-extremist think tank The Quilliam Foundation said: “This video is yet more evidence of Islamic State seeking to indoctrinate children from a very young age in an attempt to entrench its hold over the region. Such footage is worrying, in particular because it renders apparent the fact that IS’ legacy will be long-term, even if it was to collapse tomorrow.”

    Another video documents men bartering over Yazidi slaves. Sitting on sofas in a living room, a man wearing a white cap turns to the camera and says “Today is slave market day. Today is the day where this verse – “… except with their wives and the (captives) whom their right hands possess, for (then) they are not to be…” today is distribution day, God willing. Each one takes his share.”

  • ‘IS: The Next Generation’? Militants Recruit Children (rferl.org)
    Abu Usama is not playing at being an Islamic State militant. He is one of the extremist group’s child fighters. IS social media lauded him as the youngest fighter to guard the front lines in the Syrian town of Kobani, which IS has besieged.

    Over the past weeks, more and more reports have emerged with evidence that IS militants are providing military training to schoolchildren in Syria and Iraq.

    Other reports claim that the extremist group is also using children as young as 13 as fighters.

  • Cubs of the Caliphate: ISIS Trains Boys to Go to Battle (nbcnews.com)

    Some graduates of the camps are used as human shields and suicide bombers. Other wee warriors man checkpoints, hoist heavy weapons and act as enforcers.

    Beyond the additional fighting power, analysts and experts say brainwashing young recruits is a strategic move aimed at ensuring the militant group’s longevity by providing a ready-and-willing next generation of jihadis.

random thoughts from lorne

The grave of V.J. Strudwick at Essex Farm. The grave of V.J. Strudwick at Essex Farm.

When we visited the Commonwealth Military Cemetery at Essex Farm, near Ypres, Belgium, our guide pointed out the grave of V.J. Strudwick, who was killed in action January 14, 1916 at age 15. The official age to enlist was 18, for overseas service 19.

Recruiters though generally didn`t ask probing questions, and identification documents were not all that common in those days before drivers licences, when people may not have ever even seen a car. Joe Strudwick was in all probability adult sized and willing to enlist; he said he was 19 and they either believed him or looked the other way.

It was a young man’s war, as they generally all are. With age comes maturity; older men are more likely to question the validity of a war, more likely to have family responsibilities and less likely to unquestioningly volunteer for…

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On Veteran’s Day

One of the leading poets of the First World War, Siegfried Loraine Sassoon, CBE, MC (1886 – 1967) his poetry both described the horrors of the trenches, and satirised the patriotic pretensions of those who, in Sassoon’s view, were responsible for a jingoism-fuelled war.
We may wonder what his lone protest against the continuation of the war in his “Soldier’s Declaration” of 1917 has made politicians change their ideas. Problem with human souls is that their perverted exercise of power shall continue bloodshed all over the world.

Skull 1924 by Otto Dix.

Skull 1924 by Otto Dix. Photograph: The British Museum

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  • Doctor who treated Siegfried Sasson ‘pioneered’ anthropology (theguardian.com)
    William Rivers, the doctor who treated officers including Siegfried Sassoon for shell shock during the first world war, and who was memorably brought to life in Pat Barker’s Booker prize-winning Regeneration trilogy, was also one of the fathers of social anthropology, according to a new book which claims his work in the field was written out of history by subsequent academics.
  • Young poets speaking up for the Great War’s ‘forgotten’ (oxfordtimes.co.uk)
    3 young people from the Leys Community Development Initiative (CDI) will perform one-minute tributes to the forgotten citizens of the war.
    +
    “The contributions of some communities in the UK and across the globe are often overlooked and this project aims to shine a light on all those who paid a price to help secure the freedoms we hold so dear today.”
  • Tower of London Poppy Tribute (serenataflowers.com)
    A red sea of ceramic poppies has been placed at the Tower of London in order to celebrate the 100th year of the First World War. So far an incredible £11.2 million has been raised for charity.

    Aptly named the Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, the piece of art will eventually see a total of 888,246 poppies in the ground to represent each and every solider that died from the UK, Australia and the Commonwealth during World War One.

  • the soldier poets of the First World War (3quarksdaily.com)
    One of the worst experiences for soldiers in the trenches seems to have been the sense that landscape itself had been dissolved and unwritten by the continuous bombardment known as drum-fire, and replaced by what David Jones called “the unformed voids of that mysterious existence”. Place, ground to stand on and comprehend, took on especial importance in a war of attrition. The places from which the war poets came, and to which they looked back, were often as bloodstained as Otterburn – Wilfred Owen’s Romano–Welsh border, Jones’s half-legendary Welsh interior, Siegfried Sassoon’s Sussex where the Normans invaded, and Rupert Brooke’s more generalized England, dulled, as apparently it seemed to him, by the long post-Napoleonic respite from direct military threat.
  • History and all its grisly facts are worth more than the illusion of memory (tphnh.blogspot.com)
    Cameron is wrong. Poppies muffle the truth about world war one
    In 1924 the German artist Otto Dix depicted a skull, lying on the ground, a home to worms. They crawl out of its eye sockets, nasal opening and mouth, and wriggle among patches of hair and a black moustache or are they growths of grass? that still cling to the raw bone.
    +
    These experiences were real, this war was real, and it means absolutely nothing to reduce it all to vague feelings of universal grief. What we owe the youth of that generation is to attend to the details of the history that caught them in its hungry jaws. We need to smell the rotting earth and gunpowder, feel the boots falling apart in muddy water, the pounding in the chest as the guns started up. The installation at the Tower is abstract, and tells nothing about that history. It is instead a representation of grief as such – a second-hand evocation of feelings about the dead.
  • The lights of the living (macleans.ca)
    The spectres of Sassoon and Owen were certainly palpable earlier this month when, on Oct. 17, nearly 10,000 torchbearers stood for an hour in complete silence along Belgium’s Western Front as part of a ceremony called the Light Front. From the town of Nieuwpoort, along the bank of the Yser river, through the hills of Ypres and Heuvelland to Mesen and Ploegsteert, thousands of people from Europe and North America came out to remember the cataclysm of human loss that began and ended on this stretch of land a century earlier.
  • 27 British People Pay Tribute To Their Relatives Who Died During World War I (buzzfeed.com)
    Thousands of people are also remembering Britain’s soldiers – and their family members – online, through a variety of messages. Here are some of them:

Shelf Talk

This is the year we commemorate the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of World War I. There is a beautiful and moving installation of poppies at the Tower of London, especially to honor the British and colonial deaths in that war.

Poppy panorama by Phil Guest via Flikr

But more generally let me say: there are not words enough to honor our veterans, nor praise great enough to mitigate their sacrifices. We grieve for those who were lost in war, we think of those who survive it, we hold those in the midst of war in our hearts today. For this day, a poem from the man who became the voice of World War I for many people, Siegfried Sassoon. Many of his poems are bleak and hard to read, but this one has always shaken me the most; that he went through war, a horrific war, and could still write something so hopeful, or at least…

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Reflections on the Great War #2

Today 11 November Remembrance day many grieve for those who were lost in war. It is a day we think of all the violence which still goes on in this world. Lots of men went through a horrific war, and when they came back in heir family they often were broken and could not find their way back in normal life. Many did not have any clue of what they had to endure. Today the madness still goes on at several places on this globe.

In this world there are people who want to divide and others who want to heal. All people should try to get others to see that it has no use to fight and that wars are the worst tragedy that can come over the world, war bringing many countries in agony, because of some man their love for power.

More people should come to understand that we can only improve the world by improving the Faith and that we should not put off for tomorrow what we can do today.

 

In the November issue of the Christadelphian is spoken about

  • 100 years ago
  • Studies in Matthew’s Gospel 11 – “That it might be fulfilled …” | John Benson
  • The ministry of reconciliation | Geoff Henstock
  • Archaeology in focus 11 – Horses & riders | James Andrews
  • Reflections on the Great War (2) | Les Shears
  • Bible Companion | John Hingley
  • Enhancing our worship Suggestions for November | John Botten
  • The purpose of the Ecclesia 09 – The Ecclesia as the flock part 2 | Peter Anderton & Paul Tovell
  • Electronic Hymn book
  •  “Until seventy times seven” | Stephen Whitehouse
  • Faith Alive! Seeing the invisible | Paul Dredge
  • Book Review Beginning at Jerusalem by John M. Hellawell | Stephen Whitehouse
  • Signs of the times Russia: strong enough to act? | Roger Long
  • Israel and their Land Parting the land | Roger Long
  • Epilogue  “Examine yourselves … test yourselves” | David Caudery
  • The brotherhood near and far

and can you find this 2° article on the Great War:

Reflections on the Great War

On August 4, 1914, the British government issued an ultimatum to Germany, demanding that their troops leave neutral Belgium. Germany had declared war on France the previous day and had begun the invasion of Belgium as a precursor to the planned encirclement of Paris. Following the rejection of the ultimatum, Britain declared war on Germany at 11 pm.

The war begins

The British, Belgian and American lines of att...

The British, Belgian and American lines of attack, during the Hundred Days Offensive (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Many greeted this action with enthusiasm, convinced that the war was a just cause and that it would soon be brought to a successful conclusion. However, as Brother John Botten pointed out in his introductory article (Reflections on the Great War #1 100 years on), while the Royal Navy was supposedly far superior to any other navy, the British army was far smaller than the vast armies of continental Europe and the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) which set off for Belgium numbered only around 120,000. If the British were to make more than a token contribution to the land war then the established principle of a volunteer army might have to be overturned. This was even more apparent by the end of August, following the battles of Mons and Le Cateau where the BEF had sustained heavy casualties and, along with the French army, been forced into a long retreat by vastly superior German forces. On September 5 (by which time the Germans had reached the River Marne and were threatening Paris), newly appointed Secretary of War, Lord Kitchener, called for 100,000 volunteers and over the next week some 175,000 enlisted. News of German atrocities committed against Belgian civilians was eagerly seized on by a jingoistic press and helped in this process. Although the German army was forced back from the Marne, much fighting lay ahead in 1914 before the front line was stabilized – roughly along a line running north from Noyon past Arras and around Ypres to the Belgian coast, and east and south to the Swiss frontier. By the end of the year the British, French and Belgians had suffered a combined total of over 1,000,000 killed, wounded or missing, the vast majority of them French. The BEF’s ability to function had been severely compromised; more and more men would be required. There was still no suggestion of any immediate need for conscription, but public opinion was becoming increasingly ‘hawkish’.

22 August 1914: "A" Company of the 4...

22 August 1914: “A” Company of the 4th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, resting in the town square at Mons. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Things had not gone well at sea either and elements of the German fleet had bombarded towns along the east coast, notably Hartlepool, Scarborough and Whitby, causing over 700 casualties. One victim of those bombardments was Brother Ripley of Whitby, whose house was practically destroyed by a shell, although he escaped injury.

Objection to military service

How did the brotherhood respond to the outbreak of war and its progress over the first six months? It would be good to be able to report that there was unanimity, but alas, that was not the case. Indeed, there was not even agreement as to whether we should petition government to register our conscientious objection to military service. There are lessons here for us all.

William Ewart Gladstone Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in office 15 August 1892 – 2 March 1894

William Ewart Gladstone Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in office 15 August 1892 – 2 March 1894

The cabinet had first discussed the necessity of conscription for all males aged 18-40 back in 1875, prompting Brother Robert Roberts to suggest that “a petition to Parliament might not be without advantage”. [1] No lesser figure than William Gladstone agreed to present the petition, only for disagreements within the brotherhood about the timing of the petition to surface and it was abandoned. In 1903, perhaps prompted by the South African War, a petition signed by about forty ecclesias was prepared but not presented. Almost immediately after the declaration of war in 1914 the issue again raised its head within the community. [2] On August 13, 1914, a meeting attended by almost 1,000 persons was held at the Temperance Hall in Birmingham. The following resolutions were passed with “practical unanimity”:

“‘That this meeting records its unshaken conviction that the commandments of Christ forbid the bearing of arms and bloodshedding.’

‘That in the present state of the nation it is not desirable to present a petition praying exemption from the bearing of arms.’

‘That we agree to the form of petition that has been presented and place it on record for possible use hereafter.’”

At the same time it was noted that there was some objection to clause 7, “for reasons which need not now be stated”. [3]

The reasons for delay in registering our position with the government are difficult to fathom. There was obviously a concern that any petition should not appear to be prompted merely by any current conflict, but there does appear to have been a degree of complacency when there was no immediate threat.

Facing a time of trial

If there seemed to be agreement about our objection to military service, there was considerable disagreement about what brothers and sisters could or should do in the event of war. The original wording of clause 7 was:

“That the conscientious objection of your petitioners does not extend to strictly non-combatant branches of National Service, but only to those which involve the bearing of arms or resort to force.”

Apparently, the author of this clause intended it to mean that brothers would have no objection to work of national value in a civil capacity not involving an oath of allegiance, but it is easy to see how the wording could be misconstrued and lead to future problems. The clause was omitted from the petition that was finally presented. Nonetheless, this remained a difficult area. An article entitled, “Our Plain Duty” appeared in the September edition of The Christadelphian. The author was clear that “we may neither bear arms nor use violence”, but he went on to write:

“In free civil life brethren may be found employed about munitions of war, for in this century nearly everything can be, and is, put to military use; therefore to work in a non-combatant capacity under conscription cannot rightly be called an outrage on our faith and practice. There are already some of us who, from good Samaritan motives, are now volunteering medical, and nursing, and other kindred service …”

It may well be that almost anything could be used in the war effort, but it is concerning to read of one meeting welcoming a brother whose work “at Vickers’ gun factory” had brought him to the area. [4] How could such employment be considered appropriate?

It is easy to sit back and criticise those who were volunteering for medical work, as service in the Royal Army Medical Corps did involve taking the oath of allegiance and working under military direction. However, we should try take into account the atmosphere in which this was taking place. The government had been quick to claim that we were fighting in a just cause and pressures came on every side – the press, public opinion and even employers. We can get an idea of the sort of pressures that existed by looking at an extract from an article entitled, “Our Attitude Towards War” published in The Fraternal Visitor in October 1914:

“If ever any war were justifiable, this is one, which, from our point of view, is just … But even so, we, as Brethren in Christ, can take no hand even in this war. Not that we wish others to fight our battles; we do not. Many of us younger brethren feel so convinced of the soundness of our cause that, apart from religious scruples, we desire to take up arms on behalf of our country and in defence of all that we hold dear.” [5]

Even with a clear understanding of our duty towards God, it is evident that this was indeed a most difficult situation and not all were able to resist the instinct alluded to in the article. Thus, Sheffield (Suffolk Street) Ecclesia reported that a brother and two senior members of Sunday School had joined the RAMC, [6] while others went further and enlisted for the duration in fighting units. There are reports of this happening at Newport, Northampton, Kidderminster and York. [7] At York the brother was withdrawn from and this led to three further withdrawals, but, it appears that he had a change of heart and was able to extricate himself from the army and all were eventually restored to fellowship. [8] In other instances there was an expression of sadness and a wish that in the not too distant future they could be welcomed home again. It is difficult to be certain of the fate of all who joined up, but it seems that at least one of those brothers did not survive the conflict. [9]

The weapons of our warfare

English: French soldiers waiting assault behin...

French soldiers waiting assault behind a ditch (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It was appropriate that the Editorial section of The Christadelphian in November 1914 commenced with a short piece entitled, “The Weapons of our Warfare”. It began by citing 2 Corinthians 10:3-5:

 

“Though we walk in the flesh, we do not war after the flesh: (for the weapons of our warfare are not carnal, but mighty through God to the pulling down of strongholds;) casting down imaginations, and every high thing that exalteth itself against the knowledge of God, and bringing into captivity every thought to the obedience of Christ.”

It concluded, “If we have faith in Christ we shall eschew carnal weapons and confine ourselves to ‘the sword of the Spirit’ and ‘the whole armour of God.’ If we have not faith we may ‘take the sword and perish with the sword’, as Christ has said”. [10]

Les Shears

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[1] The Christadelphian, 1878, page 85.

[2] As Brother John pointed out in his article, Lincoln Ecclesia had already had correspondence with some MPs on the subject.

[3] The Christadelphian, 1914, page 422.

[4] The Christadelphian, 1915, pages 85,86.

[5] The Fraternal Visitor, 1914, page 286. The article itself runs from pages 285-289.

[6] The Fraternal Visitor, 1914, page 346.

[7] The Fraternal Visitor, 1914, page 376; The Christadelphian, 1914, pages 525,565,566.

[8] The Christadelphian, 1915, page 189.

[9] It appears that he died of wounds at a field hospital in Merville, France on July 9, 1917.

[10] The Christadelphian, 1914, page 505.

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Preceding article: Reflections on the Great War #1

**

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The Christadelphian magazine reflects the teachings, beliefs and activities of the Christadelphians – groups of believers living in most countries in the world.

The Christadelphian magazine 150th anniversary

***
Do you not yet know the Christadelphians?

Come to get to know more about the Christadelphians.Do find an overview of what Christadelphian people think, live and want to follow up.

Read more about them in :

  1. Who are the Christadelphians
  2. What are Brothers in Christ
  3. Two new encyclopaedic articles
  4. Review of the Christadelphians from some older articles
  5. Loving the Word
  6. Agape, a love to share with others from the Fruit of the Spirit
  7. Servant of his Father
  8. Disciple of Christ counting lives and friends dear to them
  9. Christadelphians or Messianic Christians or Messianic Jews

++

Please find additional reading:

  1. All the war-propaganda, all the screaming and lies and hatred, comes invariably from people who are not fighting… George Orwell
  2. August 4, 1914 to be remembered
  3. 11 November, a day to remember #1 Until Industrialisation
  4. 11 November, a day to remember #2 From the Industrialisation
  5. 100° birthday of war and war tourism
  6. 1914 – 2014 preparations
  7. Liège 2014 remembering the Great War
  8. Mons 2014 remembering the Great War
  9. Friendship and Offer for the cause of democracy
  10. Juncker warns for possible new war
  11. Balfour Declaration of 1917 remembered
  12. Maker of most popular weapon asks for repentance
  13. Kingdom of God, a journey
  14. Which man is mentioned most often in the Bible? Jesus, Moses, Abraham or David?
  15. More Mexicans start questioning Catholic doctrine and the concept of the Trinity
  16. Improving the world by improving the Faith
  17. Don’t put off for tomorrow what you can do today
  18. The world Having to face a collective failure
  19. Anti-church movements and Humanism
  20. Are you religious, spiritual, or do you belong to a religion, having a faith or interfaith
  21. Do you believe in One god
  22. Looking for something or for the Truth and what it might be and self-awareness
  23. People Seeking for God 5 Bread of life
  24. How long to wait before bringing religiousness and spirituality in practice
  25. Looking for True Spirituality 8 Measuring Up
  26. Built on or Belonging to Jewish tradition #4 Mozaic and Noachide laws
  27. Tapping into God’s Strength by Waiting on Him
  28. Come ye yourselves apart … and rest awhile (Mark 6:31)
  29. Faith because of the questions
  30. A rebellious movement founded on a fake?
  31. Flowing out from a genuine spiritual “heart”
  32. Believing what Jesus says

 

 

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You may find on WordPress additional literature:

  1. 100 years on – we remember
  2. Armistice Day, 100 years after
  3. A Century On – Remember The Fallen
  4. A WW1 Centenary Image
  5. Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red…
  6. In Flander’s Fields…
  7. In Flanders’ Fields
  8. In Flanders Fields, by Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae (1915)
  9. In Flanders Field, Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae
  10. Sable – The Green Fields of France
  11. 11-11-11
  12. Armistice Day
  13. Veterans / Remembrance Day 2014
  14. Spotlight on Remembrance Sunday
  15. Poppy Day vs Pocky Day?
  16. Poppy Day
  17. Poppy Day by Paul Hunter
  18. Poppy Day: 11/11
  19. The Poppy’s Bonfire.
  20. In Rememberance….Postcards from the Past
  21. Remembrance Day 1
  22. Remembrance Day 2
  23. Remembrance 3
  24. remembrance 4
  25. Rememberence day 5
  26. Remembrance day 6
  27. Remembrance Day 2014 1
  28. Remembrance Day 2014 2
  29. Remembering
  30. Remembrance Day (With a insight to my family and the Great Wars)
  31. Remembering my father on November 11
  32. Remembrance Hill
  33. November 11, Remembrance Day in Ypres (Belgium)
  34. 11.11.14 Lest we Forget
  35. Lest we forget 1
  36. Lest We Forget 2
  37. Lest We Forget 3
  38. Lest we forget: Harper’s war on Canadian rights and freedoms
  39. Lest we forget, message from the Minister of Veterans Affairs; City of Edmonton to hold Remembrance Day Services
  40. Lest We Forget – A Peace Remembered
  41. Europe remembers Armistice Day with ceremonies
  42. Peace
  43. A day of remembrance, a day of celebration too
  44. The price of freedom
  45. Freedom and the Importance of Remembrance
  46. Will we take responsiblity for our freedom and democracy?
  47. Poem for Armistice Day 11 11 2014
  48. This Tranquil Fields of Slumber
  49. The Parade
  50. Like the generations of leaves…
  51. Red Poppies
  52. One Of Many – Remembrance Day
  53. Remembrance Day Poppies at the Tower of London
  54. Remembrance Day: A Tribute To Our Brave Soldiers…
  55. Poppy ‘s up, November the 11th today, Montana Hotel for our Heros
  56. Poppy Day 2014
  57. Thoughts of poppies and absent friends
  58. The Remembrance Sunday Parade Setting Off, Bethlehem Street, Grimsby, 09/11/14.
  59. Remembering the Fallen on Veteran’s Day
  60. Hamilton honours fallen hometown soldier Nathan Cirillo
  61. Two Minutes
  62. Poppies
  63. Pixel Prose Challenge: Poppy Pride
  64. Remembrance Sunday: The Poppy Factory
  65. Remembrance Sunday poppies…
  66. Poppy, Poppies, and Others
  67. Please don’t remove the Tower poppies
  68. A Lily Warne poppy and other Dartmoor connections
  69. Prince Harry Rides Double Decker Bus for Poppy Day
  70. LaSalle honours and remembers veterans on Remembrance Day
  71. Video Southwold Memorial Service
  72. 100 Years Ago
  73. This year, I will wear a poppy for the last time
  74. Full Pundit: How Canada remembers
  75. Photos: Canada remembers
  76. In Photos: Winnipeg remembers
  77. Maple Leaf Journal – 11/11 Remembrance Day
  78. A Poppy for Armistice Day from a ‘Small’ Cat…
  79. November 11, 2014
  80. Twa Corbies for Poppy Day
  81. …remembrance day, patriotism for the profits of war…
  82. Happy Veterans/Remembrance Day everyone
  83. We will remember them – British Legion service
  84. Satire in the saddest of times
  85. Appreciation on Remembrance Day
  86. Watercolor: Remembrance Poppies
  87. My first post– about the Last Post
  88. To remember you have to know
  89. For the Fallen ~ Robert Laurence Binyon
  90. Remembrance Sunday
  91. Poppy politics
  92. World War I Memorial, Part Two
  93. Warriors Day
  94. The Tale of Two Poppies
  95. CyPix: Ames Ambulance Unit
  96. Wilfred Owen (1893-1918), stiched portrait, finished
  97. Veterans Day: An Origin Story
  98. The Teenage Soldiers of WWI
  99. Four Places to Discover World War I History
  100. Was fashion responsible for the outbreak of the First World War?
  101. What Soldiers Read
  102. Veterans Day And Remembrance Day Are Marked Across The Globe

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  • The Eight Birmingham brothers who served in World War One – and all came home (birminghammail.co.uk)
    Birmingham has a proud tradition of answering the call from King and Country in both World Wars. Huge sacrificeswere made. Justine Halifax tells the heart-warming – and heart-breaking tale of Corporal James Fair, his eight sons, grandsons, and great grandsons, who all served in the forces.“The last of the fighting Fairs is dead” – is how the passing of the eighth son of Birmingham’s Corporal James Fair was reported in the Birmingham Mail’s predecessor newspaper 60 years ago.
  • Armistice Day 2014: We remember them – 100 years on (dorsetecho.co.uk)
    The 1st Battalion would have a long andeventfulwar – all of it on the Western Front. From the start, they were present when the BEFfirstencountered the German Army at Mons and through the long and exhausting retreat that followed, via another clash at LeCateau.In the following year, they experienced one of the first poison gas attacks at Hill 60, on the Ypres Salient.They then suffered appalling casualties at Authuille Wood on July 1, 1916 – the notorious first day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • The Road to Ypres (oup.com)

    We have celebrated the fumbling British skirmishes at Mons and Le Cateau in late August, but largely forgotten the French triumph at the Battle of the Marne which first stemmed and threw back the German wheeling attack through Belgium into Northern France under the Schlieffen Plan. We have already bypassed the spirited Franco-British attempts at the Battle of the Aisne in September to take the Chemin des Dames. The Race to the Sea was under way: the British and German Armies desperately trying to turn their enemy’s northern flank.

    Throughout, the performance of the British Expeditionary Force has often been exaggerated. Imaginative accounts of Germans advancing in massed columns and being blown away by rapid rifle fire are common. A rather more realistic assessment is that the British infantry were steadfast enough in defence, but unable to function properly in coordination with their artillery or machine guns. The Germans seemed to have a far better grip of the manifold disciplines of modern warfare.

  • Still bearing the scars of war, the beautiful landscapes which were once the scene of some of World War One’s bloodiest fighting (dailymail.co.uk)
    The collection, called Fields of Battle-Lands of Peace 14-18, form an open-air exhibition featuring 60 freestanding photographs, each measuring 1.2 metres (4ft) by 1.8 metres (5ft 10in).
  • Liveblogging World War I: October 20, 1914 The First Battle of Ypres (delong.typepad.com)

    Strategically located along the roads leading to the Channel ports in Belgian Flanders, the Belgian city of Ypres had been the scene of numerous battles since the sixteenth century.  With the German failure at the Battle of the Marne in September 1914 and the subsequent Allied counter attacks, the ‘Race to the Sea’ began.

    This so called race ended at the North Sea coast after each army attempted to outflank the other by moving north and west.  This area of Flanders, described by one historian as having the dreariest landscape in Western Europe, contained the last gap through which either side could launch a decisive thrust.

    By October 1914, the Allies had reached Nieuport on the North Sea coast.  The Germans, as a prelude to General Erich von Falkenhayn’s Flanders Offensive, captured Antwerp and forced its Belgian defenders back to Nieuport, near Ypres.

  • World War One Cardiff council fallen remembered on roll of honour (walesonline.co.uk)
    Those who worked for Cardiff City Council and lost their lives in World War One were remembered in the council’s roll of honour. Jessica Flynn looks at the formal roll held at Glamorgan Archives
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    With hundreds of names on the list, each have their own personal story. Many were normal working class people going about their lives in the city before the war changed their futures.
  • The History of Remembrance Poppies (serenataflowers.com)
    Published in 1915, the poem “In Flanders Fields” by John McCrae uses thisimage as a symbol of the way that the poet’s comrades fought and gave their lives in battle.Its hugely powerful sentiment inspired two women who went onto be responsible for our wearing of the poppy today.In the USA after having read the poem, Moina Bell Michael started to sell poppies to raise funds for ex- servicemen. Later in 1921 the idea was taken up by Madam Guerin who sold countless poppies to raise money to regenerate areas of France that had been most severely destroyed during World War One.

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Filed under Activism and Peace Work, History, Political affairs, Religious affairs, World affairs

If Peace Should Be Peaceful

If Peace Should Be Peaceful

Someone, whose name I remember not,
Held in high esteem by friend and foe alike,
Said, ‘ There is no good war, neither bad peace.’
How true! How obvious! It seemed
at first glance.
But then, peace also is not peaceful at times.
Peace! Peace! Peace!
All peoples, of all ages
All creatures of all orders
And philosophers throughout the ages,
Sang, extolled, and praised and sought it;
It was preached from church altars,
It was taught from podiums in halls of world gatherings.
But peace has not always been peaceful.
Peace, much desired, much sought after, as it is;
Is abhorred, derided and avoided just as much.
For peace also needs to be peaceful.
And for peace to be so peaceful we need to build on peace.
If peace should be peaceful, it must needs be peaceful.
And this- possible only when people are at peace with themselves-;
Because, as it were, one cannot give what he hath not.
(‘nemo dat quod non habet’) .

– Isaias Yemane
English: Second Floor, Northwest Gallery. Mura...

English: Second Floor, Northwest Gallery. Mural of Peace by Gari Melchers. Library of Congress Thomas Jefferson Building, Washington, D.C. Cropped from the Library of Congress digital version using the GIMP. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Filed under Activism and Peace Work, Being and Feeling, Poetry - Poems