Tag Archives: Veterans

Having put lives on the line to protect the freedoms that we enjoy

 

“The veterans of our military services have put their lives on the line to protect the freedoms that we enjoy.
They have dedicated their lives to their country and deserve to be recognized for their commitment.”
Judd Gregg

 

 

English: Official photo of Senator Judd Gregg ...

Official photo of Senator Judd Gregg (R-NH). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

+

Preceding articles:

The price of freedom

May, for many a month for mothers and many celebrations

Religious celebrations in May 2016

 

2 Comments

Filed under Activism and Peace Work, Crimes & Atrocities, Political affairs, Quotations or Citations

How our governments use military charities to evade the real cost of their wars

More people should be aware of the war-machine and how governmental institutions take care enough funds may be found to ‘lard’ the fighting business.

+

To remember:

the British public will fill collecting tins for armed forces personnel.

The Charities Directory lists 276 army, 188 Royal Marines and Navy, 70 RAF and 90 ex-services (military) charities in the UK

the biggest profile with ‘Help for Heroes’.

Almost all of these charities have come into existence since 1999, the majority in the past decade.

charities to take care of soldiers after their return

responsibility, rehabilitation and care would be provided and compensation would be paid > something that the government should take responsibility for.

Looking into some of the service personnel relief charities, their relationship to the Ministry of Defence (MoD) certainly raise some questions.

Help for Heroes & Skill Force, MoD project to get ex-forces personnel into work or for new treatment centres.

obligations that society and government have to armed forces personnel “The Armed Forces Covenant.”

£37 billion annual defence spending this government cares little for the welfare of its armed forces personnel.

British public want veterans to be better supported > troubling they keep blindly giving to charity without thought for what service personnel need.

+++

Stop Making Sense

Sam Walton writes for Ceasefire Magazine:

The names of 600,000 soldiers are engraved in alphabetical order at the The Ring of Memory international memorial, in Notre Dame de Lorette, France. (Credits: AFP)Say one thing about the British public, we will fill collecting tins for armed forces personnel. The Charities Directory lists 276 army, 188 Royal Marines and Navy, 70 RAF and 90 ex-services (military) charities in the UK, and those numbers are growing every year. The Royal British Legion is by far the biggest in terms of income, with over £100m in turnover, and shares the biggest profile with ‘Help for Heroes’. Almost all of these charities have come into existence since 1999, the majority in the past decade.

However, is the government avoiding the full cost of going to war by getting these charities to take care of soldiers after their return? If a fire-fighter, nurse or other government employee was killed or seriously injured in an industrial accident at work, the government would assume responsibility, rehabilitation and care would be provided and compensation…

View original post 55 more words

Leave a comment

Filed under Activism and Peace Work, Political affairs, Re-Blogs and Great Blogs, Social affairs

Remembrance isn’t only about those who fought, but also those who refused

Too often is not seen or forgotten how much more important it would be not to take up the guns? Those who did not want to go to war are often considered as cowards, but more often they should be considered as lovers of man. Out of love for the other creations we should not kill any other creature of God without any serious reason, like killing plants and animals for food.

We also should remember those strong lads who out of their believe in God and love for their fellow man, did not want to take up weapons and kept speaking against war.
No war today can ever be justified. Other ways should be able to be found to find a solution for the ongoing conflict.

Also we should respect more those who went to the battle field but were confronted with such horror and pain that their life broke, and that they had to escape from that horror to be able to stay a human being and not becoming an animal only willing to kill anything on its way. Much more thought should be given to those courageous men who were fractured by war-violence and got shell shock and post-traumatic stress disorder.

+++

  • Old remedy provides new treatment for veterans with PTSD (kdvr.com)
    It’s an ancient remedy, that’s become a new option in treating Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, or PTSD.  Instead of prescription drugs, a Front Range clinic is taking a more holistic approach to helping local veterans.
    +
    Volunteers say their services decrease pain, anxiety and depression, alleviate symptoms of PTSD and improve sleep.  And it doesn’t just help veterans.

    “My son has had PTSD and had trouble getting back into society, and we all live in the same house, and at times it’s like walking on egg shells,” said Deborah Bailey.  Both she and her son receive treatment at the clinic.

  • PTSD: A Marine Corps Veteran’s Battle and Victory (accidentvictimsalliance.com)
    “We are on the cusp of a wave of PTSD,” says Dr. Sandro Galea after presenting a 300-page Congress-sanctioned report earlier this year suggesting the Pentagon and VA are unprepared for the impending wave of post traumatic stress disorder among troops.
  • Federal legislation ignores PTSD toll on civilians (eurekalert.org)
    Purtle found that in federal legislation introduced explicitly to address PTSD, an overwhelming majority of the language – more than 90 percent of the mentions of PTSD in these bills – showed efforts were targeted exclusively at military personnel. More than 90 percent of mentions of PTSD in the bills were likewise intended to address consequences of combat exposure.

    This emphasis does not match with the frequency of PTSD in the U.S. population.

    “Although trauma and PTSD are serious issues affecting military populations, the raw number of people affected by PTSD includes substantially more civilians simply because the civilian population is so much larger,” said Purtle.

  • New method shows progress for veteran PTSD sufferers (peoplestrusttoronto.wordpress.com)
    They fight the enemy and witness death and destruction before returning home. But sadly, the mental effects of war don’t go away for many veterans who suffer from post traumatic stress disorder.

    Vía Veterans Today http://www.veteranstoday.com/2014/10/31/new-method-shows-progress-for-veteran-ptsd-sufferers/

  • Scots children as young as five blighted by post-traumatic stress disorder after suffering abuse or witnessing catastrophic events (dailyrecord.co.uk)
    “Acute external events such as accidents and natural disasters, a range of violence-related traumas such as domestic or community violence or abuse can cause this condition.

    “It is certainly more recognised now because of a higher awareness of PTSD.”

    Statistics from health boards who responded to our freedom of information requests for PTSD cases recorded in children since 2010 make grim reading.

    Children in Greater Glasgow, Lothian and Grampian are suffering the same psychological trauma seen in kids in war-torn Gaza.

    More than half of 15 to 18-year-olds in Gaza show signs of full or partial post-traumatic stress disorder after seeing dead bodies and witnessing heavy shelling.

    In Glasgow, two children aged under 10, 21 aged 11 to 15 and 15 aged 16 to 18 were found to have PTSD.

    In Grampian, nine children were diagnosed in 2010, eight in 2011 and 17 in 2012-13.

  • Doctor who treated Siegfried Sasson ‘pioneered’ anthropology (theguardian.com)
    William Rivers, the doctor who treated officers including Siegfried Sassoon for shell shock during the first world war, and who was memorably brought to life in Pat Barker’s Booker prize-winning Regeneration trilogy, was also one of the fathers of social anthropology, according to a new book which claims his work in the field was written out of history by subsequent academics.

    Rivers is best known for his work at Craiglockhart war hospital in 1917, where he treated soldiers including Sassoon and Wilfred Owen for the condition then known as shell shock, now referred to as post-traumatic stress disorder. Rivers pioneered a humane, “talking cure” for the soldiers, as opposed to electric-shock treatment.

  • Jailed Marine released (wgntv.com)
    Tahmooressi was staying in San Diego to get treatment for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder after serving two tours of duty in Afghanistan.

Stop Making Sense

RAF Veteran Harry Leslie Smith writes for The Guardian:

‘As an RAF veteran of the second world war I know that November is a cruel month for both remembering and forgetting the cost of armed conflict. During these past few days when the light grows dim, I have stumbled around London and remembered a time when, as a young man, I witnessed our capital face death from swarms of Nazi bomber planes.

In this day and age we like to impose uniformity on our past conflicts. We see them through a nostalgic lens of wartime propaganda films in which the hero gladly sacrifices his life for a green and pleasant land. But the past is not as simple or as clear-cut as our TV presenters like to suggest during Remembrance Sunday services. For every act of unique heroism we remember, we often forget or ignore all those who, because of…

View original post 94 more words

5 Comments

Filed under Activism and Peace Work, Being and Feeling, Health affairs, Re-Blogs and Great Blogs, Religious affairs, Social affairs, World affairs

On Veteran’s Day

One of the leading poets of the First World War, Siegfried Loraine Sassoon, CBE, MC (1886 – 1967) his poetry both described the horrors of the trenches, and satirised the patriotic pretensions of those who, in Sassoon’s view, were responsible for a jingoism-fuelled war.
We may wonder what his lone protest against the continuation of the war in his “Soldier’s Declaration” of 1917 has made politicians change their ideas. Problem with human souls is that their perverted exercise of power shall continue bloodshed all over the world.

Skull 1924 by Otto Dix.

Skull 1924 by Otto Dix. Photograph: The British Museum

+++

  • Doctor who treated Siegfried Sasson ‘pioneered’ anthropology (theguardian.com)
    William Rivers, the doctor who treated officers including Siegfried Sassoon for shell shock during the first world war, and who was memorably brought to life in Pat Barker’s Booker prize-winning Regeneration trilogy, was also one of the fathers of social anthropology, according to a new book which claims his work in the field was written out of history by subsequent academics.
  • Young poets speaking up for the Great War’s ‘forgotten’ (oxfordtimes.co.uk)
    3 young people from the Leys Community Development Initiative (CDI) will perform one-minute tributes to the forgotten citizens of the war.
    +
    “The contributions of some communities in the UK and across the globe are often overlooked and this project aims to shine a light on all those who paid a price to help secure the freedoms we hold so dear today.”
  • Tower of London Poppy Tribute (serenataflowers.com)
    A red sea of ceramic poppies has been placed at the Tower of London in order to celebrate the 100th year of the First World War. So far an incredible £11.2 million has been raised for charity.

    Aptly named the Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, the piece of art will eventually see a total of 888,246 poppies in the ground to represent each and every solider that died from the UK, Australia and the Commonwealth during World War One.

  • the soldier poets of the First World War (3quarksdaily.com)
    One of the worst experiences for soldiers in the trenches seems to have been the sense that landscape itself had been dissolved and unwritten by the continuous bombardment known as drum-fire, and replaced by what David Jones called “the unformed voids of that mysterious existence”. Place, ground to stand on and comprehend, took on especial importance in a war of attrition. The places from which the war poets came, and to which they looked back, were often as bloodstained as Otterburn – Wilfred Owen’s Romano–Welsh border, Jones’s half-legendary Welsh interior, Siegfried Sassoon’s Sussex where the Normans invaded, and Rupert Brooke’s more generalized England, dulled, as apparently it seemed to him, by the long post-Napoleonic respite from direct military threat.
  • History and all its grisly facts are worth more than the illusion of memory (tphnh.blogspot.com)
    Cameron is wrong. Poppies muffle the truth about world war one
    In 1924 the German artist Otto Dix depicted a skull, lying on the ground, a home to worms. They crawl out of its eye sockets, nasal opening and mouth, and wriggle among patches of hair and a black moustache or are they growths of grass? that still cling to the raw bone.
    +
    These experiences were real, this war was real, and it means absolutely nothing to reduce it all to vague feelings of universal grief. What we owe the youth of that generation is to attend to the details of the history that caught them in its hungry jaws. We need to smell the rotting earth and gunpowder, feel the boots falling apart in muddy water, the pounding in the chest as the guns started up. The installation at the Tower is abstract, and tells nothing about that history. It is instead a representation of grief as such – a second-hand evocation of feelings about the dead.
  • The lights of the living (macleans.ca)
    The spectres of Sassoon and Owen were certainly palpable earlier this month when, on Oct. 17, nearly 10,000 torchbearers stood for an hour in complete silence along Belgium’s Western Front as part of a ceremony called the Light Front. From the town of Nieuwpoort, along the bank of the Yser river, through the hills of Ypres and Heuvelland to Mesen and Ploegsteert, thousands of people from Europe and North America came out to remember the cataclysm of human loss that began and ended on this stretch of land a century earlier.
  • 27 British People Pay Tribute To Their Relatives Who Died During World War I (buzzfeed.com)
    Thousands of people are also remembering Britain’s soldiers – and their family members – online, through a variety of messages. Here are some of them:

Shelf Talk

This is the year we commemorate the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of World War I. There is a beautiful and moving installation of poppies at the Tower of London, especially to honor the British and colonial deaths in that war.

Poppy panorama by Phil Guest via Flikr

But more generally let me say: there are not words enough to honor our veterans, nor praise great enough to mitigate their sacrifices. We grieve for those who were lost in war, we think of those who survive it, we hold those in the midst of war in our hearts today. For this day, a poem from the man who became the voice of World War I for many people, Siegfried Sassoon. Many of his poems are bleak and hard to read, but this one has always shaken me the most; that he went through war, a horrific war, and could still write something so hopeful, or at least…

View original post 109 more words

Leave a comment

Filed under Activism and Peace Work, History, Poetry - Poems, Re-Blogs and Great Blogs