Tag Archives: Photography

A 2016 suggestion for some interesting photographic sites

In 2016 Wildlife Photographer of the Year and Looking at Flowers through a Macro Lens we spoke about great photographers of the wild, people should come to know, like Leanne Cole, Dan Frugalberg, Pete Hillman, Gideon Knight, Cindy KnokeTim Laman, Rabirius,  and Purple Rays (Jonathan Udo Ndah). They all bring a different touch on the way we can look at nature. Rabirius even dares to bring his own graphic mastering to change the real view, giving it an other dimension.

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Nature’s souls go to wild spaces – Cindy Noke

Those photographers show how while other’s thrive in the social whirl, a nature’s soul will find depth of meaning {Nature’s Soul~} or may explore the relationship between nature and civilisation (like for example A Book Of Animals by Rabirius).

Even when we do have to find a small window of existence, those people have the magic touch on their fingers to show us the beauty of god’s universe. In such beautiful area the Divine Creator has given to mankind, in Bragg Creek, Alberta near both the prairies and the mountains lives also a photographer we would like to introduce to you.
Christopher Martin has an artistic background, having grown up painting and sketching.  Following university, he studied Chinese painting in Taiwan. His interested in the photographic medium came around 2000 and that has been his primary artistic direction for the past 10+ years which is not bad for us who can enjoy his third eye with which he allows himself to play with reality, to share it as he sees it or to create a version of it through long exposure, wide angles or motion blurs.  The freedom he has to photograph in so many different ways feeds his creativity and helps to drive his enthusiasm to create art.

His photography has been recognized in contests run by National Geographic, Urban Photographer of the Year, Photo District News, Photolife Magazine, Travel Photographer of the Year, World Photography Organization, Photofocus, Photography Masters Cup and others.  If you are interested in seeing a summary of some of these awards, please visit this page.

It is the city man, Arte Wolfe who inspires him. That son of commercial artists who graduated from the University of Washington with Bachelor’s degrees in fine arts and art education in 1975, has made in the short time of his photography career a remarkable testament to the durability and demand for his images, his expertise, and his passionate advocacy for the environment and indigenous culture, working on every continent, in hundreds of locations, and on a dazzling array of projects, making it possible for us to travel with him in our dreams. No wonder some of the world’s top magazines such as National Geographic, Smithsonian, Audubon, GEO, and Terre Sauvage wanted to offer their readers the magical view of this artist.

Enter Gallery

Pine Peak Toned Gelatin-Silver Print, 14×11″ Image, 20×16″ Mat – Don Hong-Oai

An other source of inspiration for christopher Martin came from the Vietnam University College of Art and studied with Long Chin-San in Taiwan before he fled by boat and came as a refugee to the United States where he resides completely within a Chinese community. Mr. Don Hong-Oai Bio got recognised at the Ansel Adams Gallery, Yosemite National Park, California in 1994 and got awards from the International Federation of Photographic Art, Switzerland and from the Chinatown Photographic Society.

Paul Nicklen, a globally acclaimed, Canadian-born photographer and marine biologist,and also a  ildlife Photographer of the Year Competition winner, was the other influencer for Martin. That Canadian photographer has been documenting both the beauty and the plight of our planet’s polar regions and our world’s oceans for over twenty years. In Europe his work is known by us mostly from the National Geographic Magazine. But he is also the is the recipient of more than thirty international awards, including the Natural Resources Defense Council’s BioGems Visionary Award for his material of several years showing the world how we need to be careful about the use of fossils, not to destroy the arctic. Born and raised on Baffin Island, Nunavut, grown up in one of the only non-Inuit families in a tiny native settlement amid the ice fields of Northern Canada, he is the right man to show how not only the Inuit are endangered but an entire animal-world. for us clearly also a photographer to follow and to see how he as  a founder and contributing photographer to SeaLegacy, can work out his plans on dedicating his efforts to shining a light into the issues, species, and ecosystems he so deeply cares about.
His photography book Polar Obsession captures up-close documentation of the lives of leopard seals, whales, walruses, polar bears, bearded seals, and narwhals, and gives a vivid portrait of two extraordinary, endangered ecosystems.

Llyn Ogwen

Transmogrify–Is That A Word? / Talacre Beach – Llyn Ogwen by Mike Hardisty

Based in the beautiful countryside of North Wales Mike Hardisty is an other artist who catches our eye in 2016, the year he has been trialling some new photography software ACDSee Ultimate and PhotoMatix {Llangelynin–A Very Small Church}. For him landscape photography forms a very important part of my life and capturing the ever changing scenery gives me a sense of discovery. For him, photography in the mountains or on the coast, experiencing changing light and weather conditions, is a continuous learning process and gives him the freedom to think and live.

For those who are stuck in a city and think there can not be a place for some green and colours they also should hear Chicago’s motto which is

Urbs Horto, or City in a Garden.

Given the amount of sprawl and environmental damage that’s occurred since its founding, the blog we like to introduce would find it hard to argue that Chicago is still a city in a garden. However, they can still have a garden in the city.

Jason gardens in Evanston, Illinois (zone 5), about one mile from the border with Chicago.

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A view of the Blue Ridge Mountains

Jason Bertkay lives with his spouse, Judy, and has two grown sons. Judy, is in charge of photographs, while Jason is in charge of plants. They also motor down the Skyline Drive in Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains,a.o..

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The Texan Crescentspot photo by “bybio” the Back yard biology

We also can find a team of a mother, retired biology professor – former biology major, nurse daughter and blogger who can offer us some nice pictures. Even though the landscape looks (and feels) arid, southern Arizona seems to be a mecca for butterflies, perhaps because of the diversity of vegetation and flowers there, and they are able to have us enjoy those and many other animals and flowers in their region.

Chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs)

An Old Friend Returns – male Chaffinch – Pete Hillman

An other photographer who let us look often at his front and rear gardens is Pete Hillman, whom we mentioned already in earlier posts. Photography is his main hobby, but he does know to use a good eye and can give us close-ups of things most people even do not notice when walking around.  He knows the way of recording the beauty and wonders he discovers within nature. Most of the species found on his site were observed in the county of Staffordshire, England, where he lives, whilst others are from around various locations in the UK.

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Foggy Autumn Road by Rebecca Gillum whose gypsy soul keeps her searching

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Winter comes early to the mountains. Rime ice covered trees in Smoky Mountain National Park. – Rebecca Gillum

From the road we also get lovely pictures from Rebecca Gillum. She knows the limitations of life and is content but is able to catch that moment in time and to present it for eternity. {So I Like Best of All Autumn} In her life she want to be willing
to be dazzled — to cast aside the weight of facts, and like Mary Oliver maybe even
to float a little above this difficult world. {To Be Dazzled}

We hope you too may be dazzled finding such nice photographs. Whilst the animals may have a well-defined hunting ground that the photographers are familiar with, they shall need patience to catch it, enabling to place that magic they saw in a moment for us to discover on a two dimensional plate.

A marmot seen on top of Mount Dana, Yosemite, ...

A marmot seen on top of Mount Dana, Yosemite, CA, USA. The road in the background is Tioga Pass Road. (Edited version of original: sharpened and curve adjustment by jjron). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Please do find to read

Get the lenses out to getting closer again

Looking at Flowers through a Macro Lens

Birds, Birds Everywhere

2016 Wildlife Photographer of the Year

8 Reasons We’re Looking Forward to Springtime Photography

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Find the interesting sites

  1. Cindy Knoke + on Pinterest
  2. Rabirius whom you also can follow on Pinterest
  3. Don Hong-Oai Bio
  4. Christopher Martin
  5. Art Wolfe
  6. Paul Nicklen
  7. Say It With A Camera – Mike Hardisty
  8. Garden in a city
  9. Rebecca Gillum
  10. Back yard biology

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Further reading

  1. In My Own Words Weekly Photo Challenge- Tiny
  2. Photography Journal Blog Weekly Photo Challenge- Tiny
  3. Weekly Photo Challenge – Small on Tiny – Celina2609’s Blog
  4. Our Own Little Walk of Fame – Aggie’s Amygdala
  5. Say Tiny! – Blog of Hammad Rais
  6. thephotoseye Tiny Thrills
  7. Another Tiny View – Rebecca Wiseman Portfolio
  8. Miss Jerz-tucky Weekly Photo Challenge- Tiny
  9. Words Like Honey Weekly Photo Challenge- Tiny
  10. deetravelssite.wordpress.com Tiny
  11. This is Another Story Color Transformation
  12. From Egg to Sheer Beauty – Micks Blog
  13. Doug Couvillion’s Photo Blog Weekly Photo Challenge- Transmogrify
  14. Sea Play Photography Weekly Challenge- Transmogrify
  15. XingfuMama My little pumpkins don’t do scary
  16. Crafting Photolog Weekly Photo Challenge- Transmogrify
  17. Mataro Photographs Halloween Transmogrification
  18. Nature & Travel Photos WPC – Transmogrify
  19. Let the Images Speak Transmogrify
  20. The Land Slide Photography Time
  21. Mr. Finch
  22. Photographs from the Edge- Review
  23. On the Hunt
  24. Take Away
  25. A Twist of Moss
  26. DX vs. FX cameras for wildlife photography
  27. Breaking It Down
  28. Of Fairytales
  29. butterflies in the desert?
  30. An Alien World #2
  31. Land of Lilliput
  32. Common Greenshield Lichen
  33. Pawpaw Sphinx
  34. This Way and That
  35. Charming smile
  36. Birds of the Texas Gulf Coast – Common Nighthawk
  37. Great Horned Owl
  38. Friday’s Frenzied Flights
  39. “I’ve Got To Tell Everybody About This!”
  40. Limb with a View
  41. Caribou in Newfoundland
  42. Even More Jelly ear
  43. Golden Tanager (Tangara arthus)
  44. A photographer’s eagle eye
  45. Into the Sunset
  46. A Dazzle of Zebra, a Journey of Giraffe and a Crash of Rhino
  47. Best Camera Trap Captures – October 2016
  48. Camdeboo – The Green Valley In The Great Thirstland
  49. Up Close!
  50. Pure Magnificence
  51. Octoberfest 2016
  52. Wild November Sky
  53. Along the Rio Grande
  54. Fotografare animali selvatici con TriggerSmart
  55. One Left For The squirrels
  56. A Highland Cow
  57. Wings
  58. Beautiful Bracken
  59. Birds at the British Wildlife Centre
  60. Supermoon
  61. Supermoon #2
  62. Drones and Machine Learning Combine to identify, protect endangered sea cows
  63. Male Kestrel
  64. Riverside
  65. First Snow of the Season
  66. Muddy Ibis
  67. Hiding Place
  68. Tiny
  69. Crazy Legs
  70. Weekly Photo Challenge: Tiny
  71. Photographer Tim Plowden gets up close and personal with forest creatures
  72. In the presence of greatness
  73. Magpie
  74. About Mites And Ticks
  75. About Grasses, Sedges And Rushes
  76. Swallow
  77. Tiny friends
  78. Junco Junkie
  79. Dark Eye with a Catchlight
  80. This Beautiful Bird
  81. Bulrush

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Filed under Nature, Pictures of the World

2016 Wildlife Photographer of the Year

By the English daily newspapers we may find The Guardian which has an eye for the way human beings fit in the universe and how we can look at what is around us. They have in the week several themes looking at a certain aspect around building up the human being and about man’s relation with his environment.

For them it is necessary that man does something seriously to avoid climate change bringing us down. Without a balanced, comparative assessment of strategies to align energy use and industry with inescapable climate action, we won’t be able to choose the best possible future. Man also has to come to see how nature is an essential part making it possible for us to live nicely.

Stretching to a full harvest

Stretching to a Full Harvest by Dan Frugalberg, talking about God Who tests us beyond our expectation but never beyond our strength.

Materialism in all its ghastly guises is pulling man down. To get them to better senses we need to show man the beauty of what is already there provided by the Divine Creator. We are pleased that there are also several bloggers on the net who appreciate what is around them and who do not want to keep it just for themselves but want to share it on their blogs which are available in a lot of countries. We can recommend a.o. Cindy Knoke, Dan Frugalberg, Pete Hillman and Purple Rays (Jonathan Udo Ndah) who present regularly an insight on what nature has to offer to mankind. On the net several dreamers with some creativity in writing, who love nature and who are feeling very close to it, can be found. One such person who enjoys life and want to share his arts with each other brings the blog Magic nature poem. He recognises that we are are surrounded by energetic creatures and writes

Humans, animals, plants, earth, universe within planets, suns, stars, moons, everything.
We are all parts of something  very big.
Everyone is a part of a very big energy.
We all seem to be seperate
But that is not true.
We are all connected by our energies.
A network consisting of our individual energies.
We fulfill the universe. {Energy #4}

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Flower ball by Magic nature poem

While the world goes around and around we have to find our position in it, making sure that we are not pulled down by the ravishing electronic speed and pushing commercial consumer society, where people live in a world, which lives faster and faster. In that world we have to stand strong on our feet, with our mind focussing on the right things. In that hectic life we do have to find moments to enjoy nature, to watch colours changing, flowers growing, animals jumping or flying around.

It is for people who want to reach their dreams, their plans that such writers and photographers may bring something enlightening. On this site we can not bring many photographs because our funds our very limited (not to say non-existent) but we would love to recommend to enjoy watching the above mentioned sites and the links we regularly offer you (our readers).

Each year the media looks at the magnitude of photo’s made and newspapers and press agencies present their photographer of the year.

Friday opened the Wildlife Photographer of the Year 52 exhibition at the Natural History Museum in London before touring internationally.

American photographer Tim Laman was named winner of the prestigious annual competition for his image Entwined Lives, showing a critically endangered Bornean orangutan in the Indonesian rainforest. The award is given for a story told in just six images, which are judged on their story-telling power as a whole as well as their individual quality.

Here you can view the winning images selected by the international jury. Wildlife Photographer of the Year champions ethical photography. Images are chosen for their artistic composition, technical innovation and truthful interpretation of the natural world > Gallery 2016

Adult and young awards

Browse the award-winning images from across the competition

Adult awards

Tim LamanTim Laman, USA
Website: www.timlaman.com

Tim is a field biologist and wildlife photojournalist with a reputation for returning from the wild with shots of nearly impossible subjects. His pioneering research in the rainforest canopy led to a PhD from Harvard University and the first of many articles for National Geographic magazine. His work has garnered numerous awards, including many in Wildlife Photographer of the Year.

 

  • Paradise performance
  • Night eyes
  • Sunrise performance
  • Banner advertising
  • Spellbinder
  • Heart-stopping show
  • The pole dancer
  • The sensitive mover
  • Entwined lives
  • When mother knows best
  • Road to destruction
  • Pursued by fire
  • Motherless

>Young awards

Gideon Knight

Gideon Knight, UK

Gideon’s interest in nature began in his garden and soon spread to his local park and further afield. From the first moment he paid attention to nature, the natural world has never failed to amaze him. He hopes to have a future in conservation as a wildlife photographer to help raise awareness through photography.

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Find also to read:

  1. Nature photography – Landscape photographers
  2. Underwater photographers –Underwater photography
  3. 2016 wildlife photographer of the year – winners in pictures
  4. Conventional thinking will not solve the climate crisis
  5. Satellite Eye on Earth: September 2016 – in pictures
  6. Environment section of The Guardian

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Further related

  1. How to Be a Professional Outdoor & Nature Photographer
  2. Conservation Photography
  3. Wildlife Photographer
  4. Wildlife Photographer – extraordinary things that happen behind the lens
  5. Rakesh Sahai – Well known Indian wildlife photographer passes away
  6. Photographing Wild Alaska and Japan’s Winter Wildlife, with Robert O’Toole
  7. Nature Photographer of the Day – John Shaw
  8. New on 500px : Wildlife Photographer by Philippe-De-Bruyne by Philippe-De-Bruyne
  9. Longtime National Geographic photographer Steve Winter explains the umbrella effect of predator preservation
  10. Joe Riis
  11. It is My Enthusiasm for Wildlife that Drew Me to Photography: Anuroop Krishnan
  12. She Married Her Stalker – Wildlife and Photography
  13. Picture Parade One Hundred and Thirty-two
  14. Picture Parade One Hundred and Thirty-Three
  15. dil aj kal camera…
  16. First Day in the Water – Wildlife Photography
  17. Infographic: How to photograph Lions
  18. Art Of Wildlife Photography with Tom Mangelsen
  19. Nature Photography Color Workflow Revealed with Christopher Dodds
  20. Night Photography – Tips for Perfecting Your Night Shots
  21. Advanced Photography: Landscapes | Landscape 101
  22. What are you looking at?
  23. Living in harmony
  24. Misleading names
  25. Tsavo Man-Eaters strike again
  26. The decline of the Red Colobus Monkey
  27. Yellowstone & Grand Tetons: A Different Perspective
  28. Vervet monkeys deserve a chance
  29. How big is the illegal wildlife trade?
  30. Charges: mock or real?
  31. Giants of the plains
  32. Highly revered, highly endangered
  33. Majestic Soarer
  34. Giddy up, Saddle Bill
  35. Pocket-sized Antelope
  36. Rock Jumper
  37. Tea and Gaur
  38. Wild Radish
  39. Meet the Slugs – Stinging Rose Caterpillar
  40. Amidst The Autumn Oak Leaves
  41. Red Bellied Marmot
  42. Common Scorpionfly
  43. Trust your future
  44. Cream Autumn Berries
  45. Moose on the Loose: Waterton Lakes National Park, Canada
  46. Yosemite National Park: Phenomenal Splendor
  47. Mangiare … a Venezia!

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Filed under Cultural affairs, Ecological affairs, Headlines - News, Nature, Pictures of the World

Looking at Flowers through a Macro Lens

For people who have not a beautiful garden or do not have the opportunity to move around and to get to a garden it is a blessing that they may find the modern tools of the computer and internet by which the world can come unto their doorstep, in case they have enough money to pay for that internet.

100mm f /2.8 macro lens

100mm f /2.8 macro lens (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

For those who look forward to see those beauties it is a blessing that there are so many photographers willing to share that what is unreachable for them. With gratitude we too want to share the macro visions and that what others can capture to portray the beauty of this miraculous world.

Thanks to all those people who allow their articles and photo’s to be reblogged and for us to give so many more people the opportunity to come to know those ‘magicians’ who can use a camera so handy.

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Leanne Cole is a Fine Art Photographer who specializes in Fine Art images of Architecture and the Environment. She has several Workshops and Services that are all designed to help you learn photography and how to use your camera to its best capabilities. Even when people can not come to her classes in Melbourne, she is providing ‘Online Photography and Editing Classes’.

When she is somewhere to share her art she uses the opportunity to make beautiful pictures which are also presented on her blog. She manages to bring the viewer in different moods by the different shades of light which may make her to create great photos. Have also a look at “Love to be by the seaside” where she shows how she can play with that light.

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We may say that

the photograph is an object resulting from a physical and chemical process

but behind the lens of the camera has to be the very good eye of an artistic person to bring magic on the two dimensional paper.

  • Also

The object has been created but before it can be experienced by a viewer, it must undergo more changes. First and foremost, it must be developed and most likely printed. Finally, it should be mounted and displayed, which provides the photograph with context. All of these additional changes can add or detract from the object in various ways, but the original information present in the photograph (artistic manipulation not withstanding) has not changed. It is still a record of what was in front of the lens when the photo was taken. {A Photograph is an Experience}

  • Most photography not anymore the exchange of chemicals, but photons striking a silicon chip and are read as an electrical signal, which gets encoded digitally.

Though digital, this is still an imprint of the light that entered through the lens. The light initiated a physical process that resulted in a representation of itself, albeit in binary code. The light gets ‘encoded’ regardless if that information is encoded in silver halide crystals or in bits. So is this the essence of a photograph, information that can be decoded into a visual medium? {A Photograph is an Experience}

  • Without the experienced and qualified eye even the most expensive digital camera is nothing.

Luckily photography is still an art-form where we do need an artist behind the lens.

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Preceding

Get the lenses out to getting closer again

The natural beauties of life

Birds, Birds Everywhere

8 Reasons We’re Looking Forward to Springtime Photography

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Find also to read:

Elohim Mar Yah showing His wonders

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Leanne Cole PHOTOGRAPHY

Last week I spent a wonderful day at the Melbourne International Flower and Garden Show. One of the things I love about going is the range of flowers that are there that you can photograph. The day was perfect for taking photos. The sun was shining and there wasn’t too much wind, sadly the weather didn’t stay that way.

{Continue Reading . . . }

macro-dahlia-mifgs-flower

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Filed under Nature, Pictures of the World, Re-Blogs and Great Blogs

MM 2-52: Second Year Anniversary

Leanne Cole finds inspiration in the city of Melbourne and travelling thoughout Victoria to take images of what she sees and making fine art images of them. She loves teaching people how to take photos, both in classes, groups and individually. You can learn how to use your camera or how to edit your photos from her.

Like us, she wants people to have a look around them and have them link to a Facebook page, a Flickr page, anywhere really, or no link, having them to do monochrome images, just for the madness of it.

Leanne Cole PHOTOGRAPHY

We made it.

Here we are two years later and we are still going. Perhaps not as strongly as we were a year ago, but we are still here.

Congratulations to everyone who has participated over the last two years, it has been wonderful seeing all the images.

From now on we will start with 3, so next week it will be MM 3-1.

pelicans-mm2-52-monochrome-anniversay

I had another image that I was going to use, a close up of a flower, but when I went to St Leonards last week I saw these lovelies and managed to get two close together. I decided they had to be my image for this special Monochrome Madness.

Don’t forget all the instructions on how to enter your own images are at the bottom of the post.  If you have entered an image then please remember to check your image in the gallery, scroll…

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by | 2016/04/08 · 2:07 pm

Get the lenses out to getting closer again

With Spring we get reminded to do things all anew. It is a new start for new life, in nature and perhaps also in our souls.

border|22x20px South Africa, Aerial view of Ch...

border|22x20px South Africa, Aerial view of Chapman’s Peak Drive. For exact location see geocode. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

We like watching beautiful sites and beautiful pictures. For those who are bounded on their wheelchair or are very limited in going places (like having limited financial means) the internet may provide them a view or window on the world. We are thankful for those photographers who want to share with us their views on this beautiful world. We do not know if they are aware that with their craft they can share the beauties of the Divine Creator His wonderworks. But at least He can use them to bring people to see that what He provides for the human beings, who can enjoy it or forget to look at it and miss a lot in their life.

For those wanting to catch the inedible beauty the world is offering it is not so easy to put it on a two dimensional piece of paper. When they want to get up close to their subject they shall need to make sure that the key elements are in focus.

Small blue green flowers WordPress site The Earth laughs in flowers writes in  Garden-photography get a little closer:

Using a dedicated macro lens you will find that only a millimetre or two from front to back will be pin sharp. If you are struggling to keep key elements in focus try shooting from a different angle and keep the background out of focus.

English: Extension tubes for SLR camera lenses...

Extension tubes for SLR camera lenses. An extension tube attaches to the body of a single-lens reflex camera; the lens attaches to the tube. Extension tubes come in various lengths and contain no glass (as the pen indicates). These use bayonet-type lens mounts. Русский: Макро-кольца для зеркальных фотоаппаратов с байонетным креплением. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In life as in photography one has to focus on the right things and look for the essentials. In life we do have to look for important matters but also have to take care to see that we do not unbalance the natural matters. Natural subjects with eye-catching textures may pull your attention for putting it on the imaginary memory. Only when we see the total picture in life we can come to concentrate on the finer details, the same with photography.

When we do not have a garden of our own we may be lucky when we can manage to see gardens caught on the little frames, squeezed a few specimens into pots to adorn front ‘patio’s’ .

View from the northern CBD towards Table Mount...

View from the northern CBD towards Table Mountain in Cape Town, South Africa. Lion’s Head is visible between the Shell and LG buildings. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Jude, the author of Travel Words, brings a a collection of her travel notes and diaries over the years, having lived in many different places both in the UK and abroad, including brief spells working as an Au Pair in Switzerland and in a Hotel in Norway followed by 12 years living in South Africa. Her childhood vision was to emigrate to Australia, but although she came close to it on several occasions she, like perhaps many of us who wanted to emigrate to warmer places. She now has her eldest son who now lives there which she is able to visit on several occasions and considering it her spiritual birthplace. Not many can be so lucky to have that opportunity.

If we are right, she also presents Small blue green macro and 60 mm a World in miniature.

You may have ea look at her sites and awe at the beauties she know to capture.

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Preceding

The natural beauties of life

Birds, Birds Everywhere

8 Reasons We’re Looking Forward to Springtime Photography

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Read also: Elohim Mar Yah showing His wonders

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Filed under Announcement, Lifestyle, Pictures of the World, Social affairs, Spiritual affairs, World affairs

Early spring butterfly

Mike Powell

Spring has definitely arrived in our area, but I was still quite surprised this past Saturday to see an Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly (Papilio glaucus) at Huntley Meadows Park—it seems so early for butterflies like this.

I chased after the butterfly several times, to the extent that you can chase something while on a boardwalk, but each time the butterfly flew away. I had more or less reconciled myself to the likelihood that I was unlikely probably not going to get a shot of this early spring butterfly when I caught sight of it again.

The butterfly landed in a muddy open area where a flock of Canada Geese had previously been feeding.  There were no flowers around from which to get nectar, so the butterfly resorted to an organic source of nutrients.

This is definitely not the prettiest shot of a butterfly that I have ever…

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Filed under Nature, Pictures of the World, Re-Blogs and Great Blogs, Uncategorized

The natural beauties of life

When we look around us we should be able to see all the beauty of nature. But many of us live in cities where we are surrounded by buildings and not much green.

The beautiful nature is given to us freely, but not many people do respect that free gift as such. We, as human beings are also not so keen to use it properly and to take into account that many after us still have to be able to enjoy as much as we did or even more. Often terrible things have to happen before we as human being want to think about what is going on or what our responsibility should be for making sure lots of people can enjoy those treasures of earth.

In many Asian countries several people are already seriously feeling the effects of the industrial revolution and the technical progress of the last two centuries. People may be happy the world advanced so much and that we do have a lot of gadgets which make life so much easier. But in many poor countries those people do not enjoy such modern domestication? Several families  by powerful storms found their riverside home destroyed already more than once. Millions have already lost more than the modest roof over their head. Millions spend their days collecting cow dung for fuel and struggling to grow vegetables in soil poisoned by salt water. They live on borrowed time in a vast landscape of river islands, bamboo huts, heartbreaking choices and impossible hopes.

Government representatives and scientists on Tuesday March the 25th opened a five-day meeting of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to finalize a report assessing the impacts of climate change on human and natural systems, options for adaptation, and the interactions among climate changes, other stresses on societies, and opportunities for the future.

The meeting, the culmination of four years’ work by hundreds of experts who have volunteered their time and expertise to produce a comprehensive assessment, was to approve the Summary for Policymakers of the second part of the IPCC’s Fifth Assessment Report, checking the text line by line.

The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) wants to achieve a stabilization of green-house gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. Such a level should be achieved within a time frame sufficient to allow ecosystems to adapt naturally to climate change, to ensure that food production is not threatened and to enable economic development to proceed in a sustainable manner.
All of us should be aware that limiting the effects of climate change is necessary to achieve sustainable development and equity, including poverty eradication. At the same time, some mitigation efforts could undermine action on the right to promote sustainable development, and on the achievement of poverty eradication and equity. Consequently, a comprehensive assessment of climate policies involves going beyond a focus on mitigation and adaptation policies alone to examine development pathways more broadly, along with their determinants.

We all should also know that we have to take a collective action because we are speaking of problem at the global scale, because most greenhouse gases (GHGs) accumulate over time and mix globally, and emissions by any agent (e.g., individual, community, company,country) affect other agents. International cooperation is therefore required to effectively mitigate GHG emissions and address other climate change issues.

Social, economic and ethical analyses may be used to inform value judgements and may take into account values of various sorts, including human well-being, cultural values and non-human values. But all people should be informed how much they themselves also can contribute to the global effect, even when their personal impact may be very small it is important that everybody does his or her own bit for the protection of the earth.
Awareness and appreciation for the environment is very important, so we should help to get others to be more concious of the importance to safeguard the earth’s future and the future of our children their children.
We would like to present a website where the beauties of nature are nicely presented but where one is not afraid to see behind all that beauty the danger of vanishing worlds. We have evolved far away form the snapshots that have served as surrogates, except perhaps for one surrogate which continues to grow, namely the extended reach of the body’s comprehension of the world.
Doing so more insistently than did other forms of mimetic representation, photography seemed to stand in for the direct, bodily experience of the individual, its lens becoming the roving eye of the beholder. Most obviously one sees this in travel and expeditionary photographs of the nineteenth century, for which skilled professionals travelled forth from Western Europe and the eastern USA to record and bring back views of sites as various as India, the American West and the Middle East. {Oxford Companion to the Body }
Photography, you could say, is the visual medium of this modern world, were events can be captured for the future, but were stories of the past can be a witness of the things human beings did or because they did not want to see, refusing to hear the signs, have been lost for the next generations.
As a means of recording, and as an art form in its own, photography pervades our lives and shapes our perceptions…

A private photobook collector and trader, living in the Netherlands, who has sold many photobooks online (Ebay.nl, Marktplaats.nl & Boekwinkeltjes.nl/Bint) and therefore has also set up a devoted website (see http://bintphotobooks.googlepages.com/)& his Blog (see http://bintphotobooks.blogspot.com/) brings us a variety of artists worth viewing.

We do know that:
“Perception is relative and selective”…If the presenter does not clarify a message, then the receiver imposes his own meaning drawing from his/her experience, needs and expectations.

On his website we can find many beautiful photographs which clearly tell a story which has to be heard by many. Therefore we also like to introduce you to it. Our world is much to important to have it been destroyed by the greed of our consumerism.

The one looking through the lens may capture a whole story in one click and make it easy for others to see that what is behind the picture. Every photographer may put his own statement in the way he looks at things. Behind the pictures may be told also a whole story and the writer of Bint photobooks may carry us away along the threads of reality which often stay hidden for those who live in the cities of the Western world.

In Kadir van Lohuizen: Putting stories into perspective for example we can learn that the celebrated Dutch photographer Kadir van Lohuizen feels that there are many big stories around the world that need to be told and that it is his responsibility to tell them in the right way. He brings us with his camera from the North to the South, from Greenland to Kiribati and Fiji, close to Australia, passing by Panama but also showing us the problems of cities in the United States, like Boston, all places where they feel the rising sees. On the net we also can find some other interesting photographs of professional photographers, like Mitch Zeissler, and non-professional photographers, who do have a very good eye, like Cindy Barton Knoke who is willing to share that what she encounters on her many travels. Having such people willing to share the beauties they managed to see others are allowed to enjoy them too, which is great. This way people who are not in good health or do not have the money or no means to make such trips to far away places can receive their dreams by such bloggers.

Having lots of people living between the structures of living quarters and offices, often confronted with the fumes, dust and pollution, they may value such beautiful countrysides, animals and by Cindy Barton Knoke also beautiful art, which give richness to the world. Those living in countries with wide fields, like in the United States perhaps do not see any sign of pollution in their region, and do think perhaps everything is exaggerated, but when they can see and hear the witnesses of those who can move around, come in different places or do scientific work, they perhaps come to believe that it is really time we do something to protect what we still have. In Belgium we are confronted with pollution and climate change nearly every day, so perhaps the Belgians do feel the urge to look for solutions more than some other citizens.

Climate-Greenland-slide-BJBO-superJumbo.jpgClimate-Greenland-slide-YDQV-superJumbo.jpg
Icebergs in a channel between Greenland’s Eqip Sermia glacier and Ilulissat Icefjord, the most active glacier in the Northern Hemisphere and so many other pictures Bint presents with his article on Kadir van Lohuizen is only showing us the figurative and literal top of the ice sheet melting as a result of climate change.

In 2012 van Lohuizen started project looking into consequences of sea-level rise in the world. Therefore he went to different regions that have been or will be affected quite soon by the rise, and researched where people will have to relocate.

The 50-year-old photographer said he started the project after visiting a delta area in Bangladesh around three years ago, where he was struck by the apparent impact of rising sea levels and noticed that Bangladesh expects to evacuate 30 million people by 2050 due to rising sea levels.

He is also aware that the issue is more urgent than most people assume

“it’s very much knocking on our doors.”

The world has waited already too long before taking the matter serious. Like in most places there has to happen something serious before people do something.

“Too often we start to think about the problem when it has happened, but not before.”

Bint writes

Aiming to raise awareness in the general audience, Kadir hoped that the message would also reach politicians and policymakers.

and gives the word to van Lohuizen who says:

“It’s going to be the biggest problem of the century. It’s not just islands disappearing but also sea water seeping into the mainland, causing soil to become saline, rendering people unable to grow crops and having more difficulty accessing clean water.”

We better make sure others get to know the beauties of nature but also show how endangered the species and our own environment is. We clearly have to share the message of the importance to keep our world in good health.

The "burning embers" diagram above w...

The “burning embers” diagram above was produced by the IPCC in 2001. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Filed under Lifestyle, Nature, Pictures of the World

Birds, Birds Everywhere

You may Look Who Came to Call on the Hummingbirds Today!, or even try to look the birds in the eye.

Cindy Barton Knoke, who can not resist taking pics of Hummingbirds,has good reasons to think birds understand more about us than we do about them. When you look at her photographs several of those animals seem to look at the world with compassion and understanding how foolish human beings can be. Many of those birds and other animals seem to have us figured out.

Many birds may be curious and willing to conquer their fear. Corvids like ravens, crows and magpies, may remember the faces of people who do bad things to them for years.

Cindy Barton Knoke writes:

Most wild birds must be quite accustomed to a human before they will let you get anywhere near them. Smart birds. Starlings like this Superb Starling are capable of understanding grammatical rules and are being studied by linguists because their vocal recognition abilities surpass those of Tamarin monkeys. {Look Me in the Eye: Birds~}

DSC09233

Acorn Woodpecker – Photography: Cindy Knoke

You can not say man of fine looks and attitudes ‘flock together’ but the eye of the (probably) patient photographer shows us that birds of fine feather flock together!The writer of the blog Cindy Knoke tells us also that the San Diego Zoo houses the largest collection of bird species in the United States and manages there to take more than one a picture-taking paradise!
Today she also seems to have enough spare time to make some nice trips where she can play with the photographic lens and can capture the incredibly rich in wild bird life.
She admits to be no expert on bird identification, but for sure I find she has a good eye for them and also a good relation with creation.

She also remembers us that Hummingbirds were revered in many native cultures.

In Peru the Aztecs carved a Hummingbird figure in stone visible from the foothills.
They believed that Hummingbirds spread life, which is certainly true, as they are major cross pollinators. Their God of the Sun and War was called Hitziloppchti {Huitzilopochtli (Aztec god)} and he was known as The Hummingbird Wizard. {I Can’t Resist Taking Pics of Hummingbirds!}

What is also interesting is to see the many colours the birds have and see how they are reflected in other things in nature and in creations made by man or even more interesting by fossilization in nature itself: Ancient Creatures & Living Jewels~

One can look at those beautiful prints made by the ‘pressure of time’, but one shall not be able to capture the essence of objects.

Lots of human beings could learn from the smart birds and other animals the Creator has provided. People should also come to understand that when they do not see how to cope any more in this life, they would do better to look at the birds and to go out in the wide and wild nature, to let themselves be carried away by the colours and the movement of the other creatures than human beings. We can learn so much from them, but they also are also able to give us so much, even when we do not give them anything.

Next day you go out in the fields, have a better look and try to find the hidden birds as well. Enjoy Natures Jewels!

And let us at the same time remember, that of nature we do know very little. And the more we learn, the more we know how little we know!!

***

Headshot of a Victoria Crowned Pigeon, taken i...

Headshot of a Victoria Crowned Pigeon, taken in Jurong Bird Park, Singapore. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Birds, Birds Everywhere

Birds, birds everywhere,
flying through the sky without care.
Reminding us how graceful life can be,
as they fly from tree to tree.
Singing so very happily.

 – Suzae Chevalier = Suzanna Christina Chevalier
(Born Suzanna Christina Chevalier on April 18,1966 in Elizabeth New Jersey. Suzae always loved to write poems as a child. Writing poetry in the dark late at night. Now as an adult she has published 5 children picture books under name Sue Chevalier, but soon to be released under Suzae Chevalier. Her children’s picture books rhyme as well. Find her children poetry at http://www.puppetpoems.com and wwww.puppetpoets.com as well as http://www.suechevalier.com http://www.purplepoems.com and http://www.razelrhymes.com. She has another poetry alias that is more popular for it has more realistic poems about life on the planet-the alias is Christina Sunrise and visit her website http://www.christinasunrise.com and on poemhunter as well. )
English: Female House Sparrow, Bairnsdale Aust...

Female House Sparrow, Bairnsdale Australia. Taken in September 2006. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Preceding articles:

God’s wisdom for the believer brings peace

The Blues Can Make You…….Happy!

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Please find also:

  1. Beeps, Cheeps & A Chuckle for Your Friday!
  2. Don’t Ever Go With Your Husband to the Barber Shop!
  3. Okay, Okay. IF I Post Any More Hummingbirds, I’ll Facilitate and Attend My Own Therapy Group for People Who Compulsively Photograph Hummingbirds!
    (For anyone who reads this and does struggle with compulsive issues, laughter is one of the best healers. Have a good laugh and please know you are far from alone. Compulsive difficulties can be very successfully treated. I recommend you look for a therapist with expertise in this area and a good sense of humor!)
  4. Some Wild Birds Around the World!
  5. The Migration is on at The Holler!
  6. Have You Ever Been Stared at by a Hummingbird?
  7. Humingbirds Visiting The Holler Today!
  8. The Baby Hummer Who Crashed Into Glass!
  9. La Lengua del Colibrí
    Although hummingbirds are at The Holler year round, the spring migration brings greater numbers of hummers to The Holler.
  10. Holler Birds Put On Their Holiday Coats for You!
  11. Feathered Tuesday:Holler Hummingbirds, Hawks, Golden Eagles (and sweet little finch!)
  12. Hummingbirds, Snapdragons & Tigertails!
  13. The Hummingbirds are Becoming Tame!
  14. The Holler Birds Said Welcome Home!
  15. Rural Resident Overfeeds Wild Birds!
  16. Eagle Owl!
  17. Anza Avian Refuge!
  18. Hawk Headed Parrot!
  19. Red Shoulders and Red Tails!
  20. Hanging Out with the Hawks Pt I (of III): Red Tails
  21. Hanging Out with the Hawks: Pt. II (of III) The Harris Hawks!
  22. The Birds of Patagonia! Wow!
  23. Patagonian Birds!
  24. The Birds Prepare for Shelter as the Moon Rises, Late in the Patagonian Night!
  25. The Glorious Birds of Australia!
  26. Pelis-Can Do…..
  27. Hhh! (Last Post on Topic for Awhile)

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Further reading:

  1. What is life?
  2. Taking care of mother earth
  3. Searching for fulfillment and meaning through own efforts, facing unsatisfaction and depression
  4. Spring Time Is Coming
  5. Tu B’Shvat, the holiday of the trees
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Filed under Knowledge & Wisdom, Nature, Pictures of the World, Poetry - Poems

8 Reasons We’re Looking Forward to Springtime Photography

Life through Lens and Melody

Ah, the changing of the seasons. For us photographers, most seasonal changes bring about opportunities to take great photos under differing conditions, and usually no change is more dramatic than the transition from winter to spring.  The world thaws into a new and color-dripped landscape, ripe for capturing its natural beauty through springtime photography.

Photo by Barbara Florczyk

Photo by Barbara Florczyk

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Filed under Pictures of the World, Re-Blogs and Great Blogs