Tag Archives: Passover rituals

Stuck in Mitzrayim looking at an exodus out of slavery

Today’s guest-speaker looking at Psalm 37 knows that there are times in our lives when we are called to speak up and let our voices be heard, but also times to be silent.

The psalms of David may sound great in our ears and get us carried away in service showing our love for God with exuberance. There may be deep darkness in our world, but we lightening candles hear that music that has the power to awaken the light.

“I will praise Thee, O Lord, among the people; I will sing unto Thee among the nations.” (Psalms 57:9 KJ21)

Today’s rabbi writes

Music has the power to bring people together, singing in harmony, but the music of much of the Middle East these days is not an inviting melody.

Thomas Fuller

17th century British scholar, preacher Thomas Fuller

An old proverb of uncertain origin goes, it’s always darkest before the dawn. A version of this first appeared in print in 1640 in a travelogue by the English theologian and historian Thomas Fuller entitled, A Pisgah-Sight Of Palestine And The Confines Thereof.

How sad that he wrote this when traveling through Israel; and that more than 370 years later, the dark clouds still loom over much of the region. {Psalm 57}

Therefore in these darker days of the time coming closer to the end times, we should shed the light and show others which great event and which hope we are remembering the coming days.

Now we have come to a time to thank God and to sing for Him. A time to show our thankfulness that he liberated His chosen people and was willing to provide a marvellous future, a Kingdom to come, with a Holy Land where there shall be no slavery any more to whatsoever and where there shall be peace.

Today’s guest-speaker knows

A Seder table setting

A Seder table setting (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

that there are Jews who do not have a Seder or celebrate Passover by putting away the bread and cereal and other leavened grain products for eight days in favor of matza. No matter what you do for Passover, I encourage you to take the holiday experience, especially the Seder, seriously. {Divre Harav/Words from the Rabbi – April, 2015}

It is a period we may not let pass unnoticed. The Divine Creator demanded it to be a special time until the eternity.

The critical element of the Passover Experience is not the elaborate food eaten for dinner at the Seder, but rather the thought that goes into preparing food without leavening and the symbolism behind it. One common take on hametz, leavening, is that it symbolizes the ego. The opposite of hametz, matza, symbolizes humility. Passover can be seen as an exercise in reducing the ego and developing a humble attitude towards caring for others.

The critical element of the Seder is not the brisket or the matza ball soup, but rather the retelling of the story of the Exodus, with the focus on how that story moves us to see and address oppression in the world around us. {Divre Harav/Words from the Rabbi – April, 2015}

Now has the time come to stand still by those old stories of men and women who had to work hard and did not see any way out of slavery. Time to wonder how are relation with God is and if there are no sins hindering or to impede a good relationship. Today there are still many forms of slavery going on. But we should know that the Elohim promised a Messiah and that always all promises of god become a reality.

We should trust the Most High and study the Torah, letting us inspire and build up our personality.

Perhaps at the proper candle-lighting time, before candle-lighting doing the 4 questions and 4 children and singing songs, you too may tell the story of Pesah in a very abbreviated way.

In keeping with the mishnah’s instructions to tell the story from degradation to redemption, we basically tell the story by reading the key passages of the Hagaddah from Deuteronomy 26:5-8, reciting the plagues, the teaching of Rabban Gamliel and the beginning of Hallel. {Divre Harav/Words from the Rabbi – April, 2015}

It is a moment to be humble and to share the many goods we have with others. Time to put ourselves aside, to think about God’s people and to give praise to the Most High.

When we do feel lonely and blocked in this material world, where we see so many slave to material goods and to money delivering jobs, we can think of the capital Mitzrayim.

The Hebrew word for Egypt is Mitzrayim, a word that connotes narrow places  (probably taking its name from the fact that the fertile part of Egypt is a narrow strip of land on either side of the Nile).  In a metaphorical sense, when we are stuck in Mitzrayim, we are living our lives in a constricted place. We are stuck inside a narrow box.  Pesah is the time to look at the narrow box in which we are living, look at those behaviors which keep us stuck in a rut, and free ourselves. {Stuck in a Rut? Pesah Tells You to Get Unstuck!}

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Preceding articles

Seven lights or basic emotions

How to Live Beyond the Ordinary

Psalm 37 Humble inheriting the earth

Thoughts on Passover

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The Last Supper was a Passover meal

English: Passover Seder Table, Jewish holidays...

Passover Seder Table, Jewish holidays עברית: שולחן הסדר, Original Image Name:סדר פסח, Location:חיפה (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Too often Christians do forget rabbi Jeshua wanted to conclude the study time of his disciples as a seudat sium or concluding meal after the intensive 3 years of going around discussing the Holy Scrolls.

Intentionally this preparation meal was to show the offering of a new unblemished lamb and offering the world symbols for a new world of which Jeshua is the first new born, the 2nd Adam or the first of the New Creation.

By his demand to break the bread in remembrance of him the world was given a new sign for the doorpost, bringing liberation to all people who are willing to accept Jeshua as the sent one from God.

The apostles bring us a good report of what happened on the day Jesus asked to prepare everything to celebrate Passover. At the gathering taking in remembrance why we have to celebrate Passover those present thought Judas was going to buy something for the group for Passover.

The importance in this “Last Passover” narrative, like nelson says,

  is Yeshua saying of the cup after supper

“This cup is the new-quality covenant in my blood, the one being poured out in behalf of you.”

Now; Messiah is our Passover:

1Corinthians 5:7 “YOU-purge-out the old leaven, in-order-that YOU-might-be (a) new lump, according-as YOU-are unleavened-breads.

For even our passover was-sacrificed, Messiah. v8 So-that let-us-be-keeping-the-feast not with old leaven neither with leaven of-malice and of-evil, BUT with unleavened-breads of-sincerity and of-truth.” Hallelujah!

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Please do find additional reading for this most important weekend of the year:

  1. Most important weekend of the year 2016
  2. 1 -15 Nisan
  3. Yom Hey, Eve of Passover and liberation of many people
  4. This day shall be unto you for a memorial and you shall keep it a feast to the Most High God
  5. 14-15 Nisan and Easter
  6. Days of Nisan, Pesach, Pasach, Pascha and Easter
  7. Getting out of the dark corners of this world
  8. A Holy week in remembrance of the Blood of life
  9. Around the feast of Unleavened Bread
  10. The son of David and the first day of the feast of unleavened bread
  11. Day of remembrance coming near
  12. A new exodus and offering of a Lamb
  13. Observance of a day to Remember
  14. Jesus memorial
  15. Holidays, holy days and traditions
  16. Seven Bible Feasts of JHWH
  17. High Holidays not only for Israel

  18. White Privilege Conference (WPC) wanting to keep the press out for obvious reasons
  19. First month of the year and predictions
  20. Entrance of a king to question our position #2 Who do we want to see and to be
  21. Death of Christ on the day of preparation
  22. A Great Gift commemorated
  23. Shabbat Pesach service reading 1/2
  24. Passover and Liberation Theology
  25. Seven days of Passover
  26. Kingdom Visions of Rainbowed angel, Lamb in Mount Zion
  27. Kingdom Visions of God’s judgements and Marriage of the Lamb
  28. The Song of The Lamb #2 Sevens
  29. The Song of The Lamb #7 Revelation 15
  30. Why we do not keep to a Sabbath or a Sunday or Lord’s Day #3 Days to be kept holy or set apart
  31. Easter holiday, fun and rejoicing
  32. Like grasshoppers
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  34. Who Would You Rather Listen To?
  35. Focus on outward appearances
  36. After darkness a moment of life renewal
  37. Deliverance and establishment of a theocracy

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A Single Seder, and Around the World

Every year we do come a little bit closer to the end-times, the moment when the Elohim thinks it is right to bring world-peace forever and have the Messiah rule on earth from Jerusalem. As long as we are not yet there, we all can try to come closer together and share the common love in the image of the Maker.

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In this story:

A chance to experience the Passover rituals

Passover story and the various and sundry customs of the holiday.

Passover story works perfectly with this ultimate hope and dream = most particular of our narratives, recalling the moment when God took us from slavery to freedom.

The Haggadah text reminds us:
on the night of Passover each person is obligated to see him or herself as if he or she had actually been a slave and personally redeemed by God.

It is the most universalistic of our stories. > doesn’t every person yearn to be free?  Isn’t freedom the most fundamental human right?  And doesn’t each person – regardless of faith, color, country, gender – deserve to be free, treated with dignity and respect, and seen as a creature created in the image of God?

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The Human Side of the Coin

Last night I had the privilege of conducting a ‘learning’ seder at St. Timothy’s School, a 182 year old local prep-boarding school for girls.  We’ve been doing this pre-Passover seder for many years now.  It gives the girls, many of whom are not Jewish, a chance to experience the Passover rituals.  Each table has a seder plate, complete with bitter herbs, haroset, a roasted bone (OK, they use a chicken wing bone!), an egg, and matzah.  We go through the ’30 minute Haggadah’ in about 20 minutes, and then the school serves the girls a fairly traditional Passover dinner, to included brisket and matzah stuffing.  The school does a fabulous job of promoting religious pluralism, and there is a genuine respect for different faith traditions and perspectives.

This was clearly evident just from the table I was sitting at.  I shared my meal with a Christian girl from Nebraska, a…

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Filed under Activism and Peace Work, Being and Feeling, Re-Blogs and Great Blogs, Religious affairs