Tag Archives: Non-christians

Migration not something to fear

With the terrorist attacks in Paris last weekend, the European Union was shocked again and the social media went as a roller-coaster shouting love and hate messages.

In most messages which tried to bring fear and hate against non-Caucasians and people of an other faith than Christendom we noticed that that’s a gross of given numbers was overestimated a lot. Many overestimate the amount of illegal citizens as well as the amount of refugees.

What does “fair” migration look like? Does protecting citizens’ rights depend upon limiting migrants’ freedoms? Or is migration actually one of the best weapons we have in the fight against poverty, injustice and social immobility – on both sides of our border?

Lets look at real ciphers:

Ten years ago, developing countries hosted 70% of the world’s refugees. In 2014 it could reach 86% of the amount of which those who reached Europe were just a very tiny percentage 4 à 5 %  of the total population of Europe.

The 49 least-developed countries – places like Chad, Malawi, and Yemen – provide asylum to 2.4 million exiles. By whatever measure you choose, the idea that the West is under siege from would-be refugees flies in the face of statistical evidence. In Pakistan, there are 552 refugees for every dollar per capita GDP; that number is 303 in Ethiopia, and 301 in Kenya. For the US, UK and Australia, the equivalent numbers are 5.4, 4.7 and 0.9.

In certain developed states we can see that people move around quite a lot to find work opportunities. This might not be so much in Belgium and Holland, but for France and other countries the locals often have to emigrate to an other place to be able to survive. Spanish, Greek and Portuguese we may find looking for work in Germany.

Most of us, if we move at all, do so within the borders of our own country – from Manchester to London, or from New York to California. In fact, we are at least six times more likely to migrate across a country (from one region to another) than we are to move across a border. There are at least 740 million domestic migrants. Few today would suggest we should restrict these migrations – in fact, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights explicitly prohibits such restrictions. But however obvious this may seem to us, your right to move within the borders of your own is relatively recent. The US Supreme Court, for instance, only definitely confirmed US citizens’ ‘fundamental’ right to ‘move at will from place to place’ across state lines in 1920.

English: Stamp of Moldova: 50th anniversary of...

Stamp of Moldova: 50th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In 2013, according to the World Bank, there were 232 million people living outside the country of their birth. This is a significant number: but it isn’t overwhelming. It means that just 3% of the world’s 7 billion inhabitants are international migrants. The real puzzle about the age of global mobility is arguably not why so many people are moving across borders, but why so many are not.

Lots of people are afraid to loose their jobs when refugees come to live and work in their country. they must see that when more people are coming to live here, there shall be a need of more housing facilities, more products to be made for the growing amount of consumers, and those coming to work here shall also contribute to the social security providing enough money to pay for the older generation which shall be able to do more in their retirement.

Until 2008, Swedish labour migration was among the most restrictive system in the developed world: trade unions ‘had, and used, an informal veto on recruitment’. Today, its labour migration system is one of the most liberal. Employers – having first advertised the job to the local EU market for 10 days – can effectively recruit any worker, for any job, from anywhere. The result? Swedish workers working for firms recruiting labour migrants earn on average 10.5% more than those working in firms that don’t. The recent rise of the far-right Swedish Democrats risks pulling apart this liberal – and successful – model for labour migration

When it comes to inequality, birthplace is destiny. In 2012, researchers at the World Bank determined that no less than 50% of our lifetime income is determined solely by the country we live in — which, for 97% of us, is also the country we were born in.  It’s a citizenship lottery – and those of us lucky enough to be born in wealthy states are automatic winners.

This means international migration is one of the only ways in which individuals can redress the arbitrary inequalities of citizenship assigned at birth. And it works – a migrant who moves from a low-income to a high-income country can expect, on average, a 15-fold increase in income — and a 16-fold decrease in child mortality rates.

Emigration is not a one-way flow: Western citizens leave their home countries too.

In 2014, at least 5.6 million British citizens lived permanently abroad. And while some of them may prefer to call themselves “expatriates”, 40% of these emigrants – an estimated 2.2 million UK citizens – are EU migrants by any other name.  That balances neatly with the 2.3 million EU migrants from other states who have come to the UK.

Did those ex-pats bring problems to the countries they moved to? Did those migrating people bring more criminality in those visited countries?

The US has experienced a 45% drop in violent crime rates since 1990. During the same period, the number of unauthorised migrants climbed from 3.5 to 11 million, and the percentage of the population who were foreign born rose from 8 to 13%. Correlation, of course, is not causation.  But it is a good indication that more migration does not translate into more crime.  And in fact, researchers from the US have similarly concluded that ‘broad reductions in violent crime during recent years are partially attributable to increases in immigration’. In the UK, immigrant “enclaves” – defined as neighbourhoods where at least 30% of the residents are immigrants – have lower levels of crime and victimisation than similar socio-economic areas without a large immigrant presence.

We must be honest and we must be sincerely looking at the reality of the migration issue.

Perhaps it would be better if more people would consider how a migration could keep a certain balance and how the refugees of today perhaps can be the solution for the problems we shall have to face when the boomchildren are going to retire.

Remember also what @Shaimaakhalil by mobilitymuse twittered today

Refugees are not the cause of violence,they are the people trying to flee it. Hope EU leaders remember that as they deal with
  • With thanks for the text-material to “Migrants and Citizens” which poses the big questions we need to be asking about immigration and inequality.

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Preceding:

What we don’t say about the refugee crisis?

Human tragedy need to be addressed at source

Real progress leaves nobody behind

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Additional reading:

  1. Built on or Belonging to Jewish tradition #3 Of the earth or of God
  2. Welfare state and Poverty in Flanders #3 Right to Human dignity
  3. Welfare state and Poverty in Flanders #8 Work
  4. Economic crisis danger for the rise of political extremism
  5. Refugee crisis, terrorist attacks and created fear
  6. Europe’s refugees just follow the ancient routes for the peopling of Europe in the Neolithic
  7. Is ISIS a product of American in-action or a product of direct action
  8. Islamophobic hate crimes rise in UK following terror attacks
  9. Paris attacks darkning the world
  10. Trump brand of migrant demonization #1
  11. Trump brand of migrant demonization #2
  12. Europe and much-vaunted bastions of multiculturalism becoming No God Zones
  13. Wrong ideas about religious terrorism
  14. State and attitude of certain people to blame for radicalisation
  15. The world Having to face a collective failure
  16. Can We Pay The Price To Free Humanity?
  17. Bringing into safety from Iraq and Iran

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Further reading

  1. Welcoming the Refugee – Choosing to Walk Away from Fear
  2. Feelings on Refugees, Post-Paris Attacks
  3. The other side
  4. So many women stand waiting behind fences…
  5. The Migration of the Irish to Newport in the 1800’s.
  6. America, the Not So Promised Land – The New York Times
  7. Walter Noteboom’s Emigration Record from the Netherlands
  8. San Marino and Paris
  9. Beach Bound
  10. Poll: Third of Jewish Israelis favor urging Arab Israeli emigration
  11. The Feld family – part two
  12. Dithane and Doodlebugs
  13. Jews Leave Europe as Arab-Muslims arrive
  14. Armenia’s independence generation
  15. Leaving on a jet plane, don’t know when I’ll be back again!
  16. Moving Home, Moving On
  17. Looking for emigrants from the Rhineland?
  18. I Need to share…
  19. Hello from the other side…

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Filed under Activism and Peace Work, Crimes & Atrocities, Economical affairs, Headlines - News

Not making yourselves abominable

In Egypt, Joseph resisted temptation to adulte...

In Egypt, Joseph resisted temptation to adultery at great personal cost. Image from the Vienna Bible, 1743 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

God has always called His people to holiness:

Lev 11:43-44 The Scriptures 1998+  (43)  ‘Do not make yourselves abominable with any creeping creature that creeps, and do not make yourselves unclean with them, lest you be defiled by them.  (44)  ‘For I am יהוה  {Jehovah} your Elohim, and you shall set yourselves apart. And you shall be set-apart, for I am set-apart. And do not defile yourselves with any creeping creature that creeps on the earth.

1Pe 1:13-16 The Scriptures 1998+  (13)  Therefore, having girded up the loins of your mind, being sober, set your expectation perfectly upon the favour that is to be brought to you at the revelation of יהושע  {Jeshua} Messiah,  (14)  as obedient children, not conforming yourselves to the former lusts in your ignorance,  (15)  instead, as the One who called you is set-apart, so you also should become set-apart in all behaviour,  (16)  because it has been written, “Be set-apart, for I am set-apart.”

Sanctification is a state of purity, set apart from defilement and dedicated to God and His service. This includes keeping our bodies from fornication (sexual immorality).
To do that, Jeshua calls on us to refuse the “passion of lust” that generates sexual sins and reminds us that which proceeds out of the man, that defiles the man.

Mat 5:27-29 The Scriptures 1998+  (27)  “You heard that it was said to those of old, ‘You shall not commit adultery.’  (28)  “But I say to you that everyone looking at a woman to lust for her has already committed adultery with her in his heart.  (29)  “And if your right eye causes you to stumble, pluck it out and throw it away from you. For it is better for you that one of your members perish, than for your entire body to be thrown into Gehenna.

Mar 7:18-23 The Scriptures 1998+  (18)  And He said to them, “Are you also without understanding? Do you not perceive that whatever enters a man from outside is unable to defile him,  (19)  because it does not enter his heart but his stomach,1 and is eliminated, thus purging all the foods?” Footnote: 1Mt. 15:20.  (20)  And He said, “What comes out of a man, that defiles a man.  (21)  “For from within, out of the heart of men, proceed evil reasonings, adulteries, whorings, murders,  (22)  thefts, greedy desires, wickednesses, deceit, indecency, an evil eye, blasphemy, pride, foolishness.  (23)  “All these wicked matters come from within and defile a man.”

Though living in this world we should not be conformed to this world, but be transformed in the newness of our mind, so that we may demonstrate what is the will of God: what is good, and what is well-pleasing, and what is perfect.
We should be an example to others, who have to see a difference of living between us Christians and non-Christians. Many in the world can not master their feelings. We should work on it and make best efforts to gain control over our bodies by renewing our minds.

Rom 12:2 The Scriptures 1998+  (2)  And do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind, so that you prove what is that good and well-pleasing and perfect desire of Elohim.

By living up to the renewal of our mind, that you we know experimentally what the will of God is, we can live in a pure condition according the Law of God and as such presenting ourselves to God as his worthy children, showing the world we are set apart or being holy.

Doing which is good and acceptable and perfect in the eyes of God we can use our bodies in holy ways that honour God.

Our choice to have pure love, good sanctified relationships, no escapades in our sexual and spiritual life not only honours God but shows our respect to our partner and those around us.

On the other hand, those who do not know God live to satisfy their fleshly lusts. By doing so, they dishonour themselves and God.

We as Christians are called out of sin’s defilement to be holy and pure in mind and body.

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Preceding articles:

Part of a great team but also of gender discrimination

Reactions against those of the other sex

Leaven

What Does The Bible Say About….Fornication?

 

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Additional reading:

  1. Subcutaneous power for humanity 2 1950-2010 Post war generations
  2. A Living Faith #1 Substance of things hoped for
  3. No man is capable of self-improvement on his own
  4. Christian values, traditions, real or false stories, pure and upright belief
  5. Object of first woe
  6. Gainsayers In Apostolic Days
  7. Male domination and tyranny giving opportunities to defile the Name of God
  8. Looking for True Spirituality 5 Fruitage of the Spirit
  9. WWJD
  10. Belonging to or being judged by
  11. Follower of Jesus part of a cult or a Christian
  12. Nazarene Commentary 1 Corinthians 6:15-20 – Flee from Immorality
  13. Hebraic Roots Bible 1 Corinthians 6:15-20 – Flee fornication and be joined to our Master

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Filed under Lifestyle, Religious affairs, Social affairs