Tag Archives: Mental Disorders

Coming Out Of The Bipolar Closet

We like to introduce the online photography gallery for people affected by mental illness and share this witness which can help many people.

Every person should know that it is most importatn always to be and stay your own self, loving your self and loving the others like they are.

To free yourself from the chains and boundaries it is necessary to get rid of secrets and to dare to be open to others. They either may accept you or leave you for what you are. But in this world there are enough people and you can not be befriended with everybody, so it is better you concentrate to become befriended with those who are willing to take you as you are.

Let yourself be known, come out of the dark and let others also come out the closet.

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To remember:
  • Be open about many of your mental health challenges
  • dare to publicly discus them
  • do not hide
  • be not afraid of stigma.
  • Gain the courage to do and act
  • recognize what you have but also that it might be just one piece of your complex mental puzzle
  • We are all individuals on our own twisting journeys to mental health and wellness. 
  • Frustration, anger, guilt, shame, sadness, isolation, self-loathing, and hopelessness
  • Nothing is  hopeless.
  • Feel a shift, and realize you can choose to live.
  • Come to live with the emotional ups and downs
  • Dare to look for help
  • Stop ignoring advice and stop hiding in that damn closet
  • take your meds, see your doctors, and be more self-aware — you can actually take some control, and start moving in a positive direction. One baby step at a time.
  • There are still a few people in your life that find you worth fighting for
  • fight through this for them, and … do it for yourself
  • You are strong. You are capable. You are talented. You are worthy of a life worth living. A change will come.

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Broken Light: A Photography Collective

Photo taken by contributor Danielle, a woman in her thirties from New Jersey who has suffered from a variety of mental health challenges, including severe depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, as well as traits of BPD, OCD, and ADD. Danielle is a writer, photographer, photo editor and certified professional life coach. she is also a passionate mental health advocate and the founder and director of Broken Light Collective.

About this photo: “I took this self-portrait several years ago, in the midst of a two-year major depressive episode. I had become agoraphobic and spent almost all of my time in that bed. I ate there, I started Broken Light Collective from there, and I even did my therapy from there. This photo represents sadness, fear, isolation, and hopelessness.

I have since emerged from that particular darkness. I still have moments of sadness, fear, isolation and hopelessness, but I also have moments of joy, connection, and hope.

I have been…

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National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month

National minority Mental-health-awareness-month JulyJuly is National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month, and health officials are using it to call attention to some surprising figures.

In many economical thriving countries a lot of problems occur by people who would like to be different or would love to have their dreams become reality.

Issues in Mental Health Nursing

Issues in Mental Health Nursing (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Lots of people think the United States of America is the best place to be happy and successful. But that country, like the West-European countries is not the place where many people seem to feel they have a healthy mind.

One in five American adults will battle some sort of mental health issue in their lifetime, according to the Department of Health and Human Services. While that may seem high, the data is even more staggering when it comes to minorities.

Hispanic high school girls are 70 percent more likely than their white counterparts to attempt suicide.

Whites are more than 50 percent more likely than Blacks to receive prescriptions to treat depression and other issues.

Asian women are the leading victims of suicide among senior citizens.

Mental Health Awareness Ribbon

Mental Health Awareness Ribbon (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The challenge for mental health professionals trying to curb those statics is overcoming long-held stigmas that have kept certain groups from seeking the help they need.

There are still a lot of stigma’s around mental health. Stigmas, limited access to care, and social and economic stresses are among the factors that keep some minorities from treating or even acknowledging mental illness.

There are multiple things we need to do to bring greater awareness to minority mental health:

  1. Build awareness
  2. Remember services are difficult to locate
  3. Remind clinicians and mental health professionals to be culturally competent
  4. Understand that:
    • Many cultures lack knowledge about mental illness or see it as taboo
    • Lack support from their own culture to seek services
    • Do not trust opposite cultures helping them
    • Struggle with gender bias

Read more here or check into this great research article published on the topic.

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To be relapsing

  • What Is Bipolar Disorder? (doylene.wordpress.com)
    Bipolar disorder is a complex disorder that’s defined by dramatic or unusual mood episodes of highs and lows. The episodes of mania and depression can range from very mild to extreme in their intensity and severity. With bipolar disorder, mood episodes can come on gradually over many days or even weeks.
  • Insights Into Bipolar Disorder (thesecretkeeper.net)
    I do not want the meds but would rather work through “talk therapy” & alternative methods to accept what comes with Bipolar. I enjoy the creative highs and experience the depressive lows and the feelings of suicidal thoughts. But I want to learn to control th behaviors and feelings.)
  • Delight in Disorder (clothedbyjesus.wordpress.com) >Delight in Disorder
    As a society or as people in general we tend to judge or fear what we do not understand.  As mentioned before this is an area that many of us cannot wrap our heads around even if we know someone who is dealing with the complications that go along with it.  This is a great book to help demystify the sickness of the mind and help us accept people who are dealing with it.
  • I’m Writing About My Bipolar Disorder While I’m Learning to Live With It (theroot.com)
    My Thing Is: I’m a teacher with mental illness who’s living proof that everyone’s fighting a battle you know nothing about. That’s why I’ve decided to tell my story.
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    When the crisis worker comes to interview me to see if I’ll be admitted or not, he asks tons of questions. Do I do drugs? Did I do drugs at the concert last night? Am I sure I don’t do drugs? No heroin, cocaine, weed, cigarettes, alcohol? I answer a confident no. My vices are not drugs; they are sex and shopping.
  • We’re All Mad Here (websterhunny.wordpress.com)
    Vincent van Gogh was famous not only for his raw talent, but also for the passionate and emotional nature behind it. Van Gogh is known worldwide as “the crazy guy who cut his ear off”. Although this act was the one that made his madness known worldwide, van Gogh had a history of mental illness and ‘emotional fits’. Today, people believe that van Gogh suffered from bipolar disorder. Van Gogh isn’t the only creative genius believed to have bipolar disorder. Winston Churchhill and Edgar Allen Poe are also believed to have had bipolar disorder. Other artistic geniuses also suffer from psychological disorders, including Joanne Greenburg – depression along with somatization disorder – and Charles Dickens – clinical depression. Certain mental disorders – such as depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, etc – are more likely to be found in the “creative types”, such as writers, artists, and musicians.
  • All About World Bipolar Day (Video) (blogs.psychcentral.com)
    For World Bipolar Day on March 30, 2014, Matthew McKenzie of London, England created a video to celebrate and inform.It shares links and information about the three organizations hosting World Bipolar Day: the Asian Network of Bipolar Disorder, the International Bipolar Foundation, and the International Society for Bipolar Disorders, as well as other information about bipolar.

    Learn more about bipolar, share, and fight stigma.

  • Bipolar disorder and those that suffer from it (followinspire.wordpress.com)
    The different types of bipolar disorder are diagnosed based on the pattern and severity of manic and depressive episodes.  Doctors usually diagnose brain and behavior disorders using guidelines from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, or DSM. According to the DSM, there are four basic types of bipolar disorder:
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    Many people suffer from depression. Whether it is drug-related or just being introverted and obsessed with people pleasing.Bipolar is more black and white…no grey in the middle. They are either manic (up and full of energy) or down to where they stay depressed for days.

    Obsession, anxiety, panic, fear of losing friends and family, all these things related to being bipolar.

    If someone you know has these symptoms, please help get them help. Because without treatment they could either hurt themselves or others

  • I’m a slander. I’m a statistic. And my mania is your cocaine high, except mine is free: Embrace Imperfection, Achieve Greatness (thebipolarbastille.wordpress.com)
    In popculture we often refer to impulsive or contrary behavior as “bipolar.” Anytime someone acts out against societal norm or the appropriate reaction, they are bipolar. It has become a term of slander to insult someone for bad behavior. And these are all completely accurate stereotypes of someone who does actually have bipolar disorder, and unfortunately for the average joe you are slandering, he doesn’t reap the benefits.
  • What is bipolar disorder? (itv.com)
    Bipolar disorder, known in the past as manic depression, is a condition that affects people’s moods, which can swing from one extreme to another. People with bipolar disorder have periods of: Depression – where they feel very low and lethargic Mania – where they feel very high and overactive Les severe mania is known as hypomania
  • Mania Symptom Profile Changes with Age (manicmuses.wordpress.com)
    When I was young, my mania was a much more physical thing.  I’m amazed my family never tried to have me hospitalized.  I think my worst manic experience came when I was 21 or so.  I clearly remember driving like a lunatic in a 25 mph zone and daring myself to crash into a tree.  I almost did it, too.  I’ll never know what stopped me but that is the point where I decided I needed help and saw a doctor.

 

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