Tag Archives: Language

What makes you following Christ and Facebook Groups

When we look at the world around us we do find an incredible amount of people who are flying each other in the hairs about controversial versions about their religion and faith.

After the Nazarene master teacher had experienced all of his trials on earth, his impalement and resurrection, we find one of his close friends writing words from above – a final message from Jesus his Father’s side in Heaven to those who are to follow him. Somehow we come to see that the curses in Eden on the earth and mankind are reversed by the end of Revelation and that the dreams and visions in the book of Daniel are confirmed and expanded upon.

  • Many of the signs and symbols in Revelation are in fact used in the rest of Scripture so you will find them de-mystified! This means that the message of the book becomes accessible and valuable to you as the Lord Jesus intended his servants to find it. {Revelation Steps}
Who Would Jesus Bomb?

Who Would Jesus Bomb? (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In recent times we have heard a lot about religious groups fighting against each other. All the news about bombings or terror acts, are not exactly a sign for us that there would be soon a condition of real peace. On several Facebook platforms one can find people calling each-other names and using a language which may belong to small frustrated kids and uneducated poor of mind adolescents, though seemingly it would be adults using such ordinary and awful words. Often those speaking at those many platforms or Groups do a lot of damage to the religious group they think they are defending. By their attitude they do so much damage to those groups because can come to believe that those Muslims and Christians are really such hate mongers.

It makes many wonder who might be those who follow the prophet Jesus and those who follow the prophet Muhammad. There are even guys who say the other have no right to claim Jesus, one part saying because he is a Christian and belongs to the Christians only, the other part saying he is a Muslim and belongs to the Muslims. Both groups seemingly to forget that the Nazarene Jesus his real name is Jeshua and was a devout Jew (belonging to the Essenes like his mother Miriam/Mary/Miryam/Maria) and not a Christian.

When those claiming that man from God use such abominable language one may wonder how they can call that man, who was s preacher of peace, as their example and their name bearer?

The Nazarene preacher also asked his followers to unite and to have peaceful fellowship, companionship, and a sense of belonging. One would think those claiming to be Christians to become part of a family, which works together, and looks after all members’ needs: spiritually, materially, and socially (1 Cor 12). When looking at what goes on on many Facebook Groups we do get the opposite impression. Instead of finding people who show their love for each-other and want to help each-other in building up their faith, we can find quarrelling (even nearly fighting) people who do not seem interested in forming a Christian family where it is a place of fun, friendship, and (as with all families) falling-out-and-making-up-again! It more often looks like one enters a battlefield.

Looking at those Groups we only can wonder what makes some of those people calling themselves Christian or Muslim. We also wonder what their real intention might be at such forums; If they think to converse others with the way they are speaking they are totally on the wrong site of the road, and do have no idea about preaching and trying to win people for their camp.

Hearing them speak it also seems to turn more around their own ego and we can not get the impression they ever would like to convince the other what the first and foremost benefit of following Jesus might be, because they concentrate most on blowing fire and showing their hate for the other. Perhaps they think it shall be of a personal benefit for them by threatening other thinkers and other believers!

Clearly lots of those on several Facebook Groups their life is not about surrender to a God-focused life, with all the sense of purpose that brings (1 Cor 10:31). But for outsiders and we should let insiders also know that, this allows Christians to recognise and, in a sense, embrace the futility of life (Ecc 2:11) but also how people behave, how they act and speak, should give others an impression how much they want to be a child of God and in how far they do succeed to become really under that Most High God His Wings.

Let us remember

Peace and forgiveness. Life can be troubling, and Jesus offers us safe harbour, forgiveness of sins, and certainty in an uncertain world (Psa 103:12, Isa 43:25, Col 1:13-14). {Weighing the costs and benefits of discipleship}

And let us know exactly where the boundaries of human decency are and how a person of God, be it a Jew, Christian or Muslim must stand and how to behave.

As human beings created in the image of God we should show to be a worthy image of That Most High Elohim. In case Christ would have still been in his grave he would probably would have turned around many times.

We should be aware how important it is to show others in which way we want to be under Christ and want to be under God. As human beings living in a mixed world, an amalgam of people of all sorts of races and ideas, we should know that there have to be certain rules and regulations to provide a sense of security and a way for living together in peace.
When Peter asked Jesus how many times he should forgive, offering a generous 7 times, Jesus’ response would have taken him aback I expect (490 times – Matt 18:22). Clearly, this wasn’t a quota of forgiveness – Jesus’ point is that our capacity to forgive should be without limit, just like God’s (Isa 43:25-26, 1 John 1:9). And to forgive so much there has to be a place for an open mind too, and today there are too many who show they are only willing to have a very limited mind with only place for their thought and no other visions.

When looking at several Christian Facebook Groups we can only question where where does all the teaching of that master teacher Jesus Christ leaves those so called Christians in living out their Christianity?

Are boundaries useful at all in terms of our fellowship, worship, and services? There is certainly some guidance in the Bible to suggest that boundaries can be useful in some of these areas – but where we choose to set them may be more a product of our cultural context than absolute ‘right’ or ‘wrong’. {Boundaryless God}

English: Copied from http://en.wikipedia.org/w...

Worldreligion (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Please read also:

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Preceding

Daring to speak in multicultural environment

Several Christians fail to recognise the Chosen ones of God and are not taking on a Christian attitude

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Additional reading

  1. Are you looking for answers and Are you looking for God
  2. Notification and news feed for Facebook users

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Further reading

  1. Gods & religion
  2. Good Without God, or Elite Background
  3. Islamic State Answers Pope Francis: Ours Is a Religious War and We Hate You
  4. 10,000 church members leave the Church of Denmark in 3 months amid atheist
  5. ISIS wing claims responsibility for Minnesota mall attack in U.S.
  6. Assholes are Overrated
  7. Chechnya’s Jewish community is angry at Israel… but doesn’t seem to exist
  8. The Storms of Life
  9. no one can answer, but the Lord
  10. The Olympic Trials of Life…By Faith And Not By Sight by Ciera Rankin
  11. In All Things, Give Thanks
  12. After the Storm
  13. He Lifts Me
  14. Gladness in trials
  15. The list of wars
  16. Revelation: The Sixth Trumpet.
  17. Is a Religious War in Europe Imminent?
  18. Iraq: Suicide Bomber Strikes At Crowd at Prophet Mohammad’s Grandson Event (Arbaeen) — Islamic State Suspected
  19. Contention 62 (Eleventh Contentions)
  20. Honor Authority…
  21. The Whole Truth (Almost)
  22. Can we not be civil and simply disagree?
  23. Bias, and Disagreeing with Something
  24. How to respectfully talk about deep disagreements
  25. What, we agree? Compatible issues in a disagreeable world
  26. The more ignorant a person is the more his disagreement increases
  27. Reflections on ‘Why I am not an Atheist’
  28. How Should I View Others Who Serve the Lord Differently Than I Do? – CCC Discover

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Filed under Knowledge & Wisdom, Lifestyle, Religious affairs, World affairs

A World Made of Sentences

We can talk and talk, and for that we use sentences. We order words and do hope the one opposite us, listening to us can understand us.

We try to bring our knowledge into the open, and try to convey others of thoughts. All of our knowledge about anything we try to construct in any language known to us and can only be found in sentences.

Without language there is no knowledge (at least of the common type) about anything. {A World Made of Sentences, Part I: Sentences and the Perception or Reality}

We have our feelings when we see things. Those feelings we like to express and therefore we use our body language and the spoken language. It is just not for nothing, but has often a serious meaning for us to be able to express ourselves.

We should realize

Language does not act like a mirror, reflecting to us a perfect depiction of reality, it acts like a filter, it makes us see reality in particular ways. The way language is constructed and the popular usage of language at any given time in history and in any given culture on earth will create a different perception of what is real. {A World Made of Sentences, Part I: Sentences and the Perception or Reality}

does not see reality as it is. He writes

I see reality as an American male at the beginning of the 21st century sees it. Some of what I am seeing may be objectively accurate, much of it may not be. And I think it is very, very important to know the difference. That is why the contemplation of the relationship between our perception of reality and language is so important. If knowing what is real is important to us then we have to deconstructed how our current perception is being shaped by the sentences in our heads. {A World Made of Sentences, Part I: Sentences and the Perception or Reality}

We are often confronted with the problem that we are not good enough in expressing ourselves with words, placing one letter after the other in a certain order.

many of us who have tried to share our mystical revelations with others have found the language we commonly use woefully inadequate for the job. Many, many people have ventured out into the further reaches of human experience only to find fewer and fewer people that they can share that experience with. The language we have is just not adequate to allow us to share the mystery that has grabbed a hold of our hearts. {The Language of We-Mysticism}

How often do we not find that the language we are used to is too specific, too rigid and to literal and when we try to express ourselves with it the listener sometimes may understand it differently than we wanted it to come over. We have grown up with one or an other language and got it rooted in our current level of thinking. Constantly it is being fed and continually words come and go, some even changing of meaning (by time).

So many of us would love that our feelings are expressed so clearly that nobody can misunderstand them.

Our goal is not to speak about our experience, but to give our experience a voice. We are not looking at our experience and describing it. We are allowing that experience to take us over and speak through us so that even we are amazed at what comes out of our mouths. When this direct communication happens in more than one person simultaneously a spontaneous process of divine discourse unfolds. The higher mind … now has control of the conversation. It is thinking out loud though the voices of the individuals. It is spiritual improvisation of the highest order.   {The Language of We-Mysticism}

Please do come to find out how looks at language and thinks

Our language conditions our perception. It shapes the way we see things.

… Language chops reality into distinct pieces and creates distinctions. The distinctions that exist in any given language are those that are important for the people using that language. Our languages have evolved to organize and optimize human perception and human behavior. If circumstances change, or if you change your circumstances, the language you had before may no longer be optimal. In fact, your old language may have become a detriment. {A World Made of Sentences, Part I: Sentences and the Perception or Reality}

When we begin to suspect how much language might be influencing our perception of reality our fundamental conception of what is real and true starts to unravel. Have we been wrong to assume that language is an accurate reflection of reality? Is there even a ‘reality’ out there to be reflected back to us in the first place? In our journey toward deeper truth even these assumptions must be dragged into the illuminating light of inquiry.{A World of Sentences, Part 2: Language and the Reality of Reality}

Continue reading:

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Further reading

  1. Let’s talk about language (and this bird)
  2. Language, Learning and Logic
  3. Language Matters: Communication at The Heart of Successful Collaboration
  4. An emic exploration to language barriers
  5. Economy of language, Eros, meaning, the public, and its problems
  6. What’s your voice vibes?
  7. Turn to the Webster’s
  8. Some skepticism
  9. #36alive 194: 5 Reasons To Learn A New Language Today!
  10. Words
  11. What is disrationalia?
  12. Descriptivists vs. Prescriptivists
  13. English Grammar in Ruins
  14. British schools: kids, commas, and tests
  15. Queers, language and the nature of reality
  16. Japanese Notes – how to express a position in Japanese?
  17. Body language
  18. World Leaders May Lie, but Their Body Language Tells All

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Filed under Being and Feeling, Cultural affairs, Knowledge & Wisdom

Trans-ability and Identity and Political correctness

Man likes to put a label on everything; The last few years they have done very difficult about that. since the 1980ies politicians and several pressure groups have been doing difficult about certain names given. This made that today for mentioning certain groups of affected people we can not even use one singular word any more but have nearly to use a whole phrase to denote about whom we are talking. In many cases the word which were made because one word would have been offensive has now become a not to be used word itself.

Two poor disabled Tanzanians in Dar es Salaam ...

Two poor disabled Tanzanians in Dar es Salaam city on Eid day. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Some ideal examples is the word for a brown coloured person, once to be called ‘black’ than “neger” or ‘nigger’ than, ‘negro’, ‘negress‘ or ‘African/American/(European) black person‘, ‘negride’ or ‘negroid’ and when “kleurling” or ‘coloured’ was not any more allowed to be used people had to search for other ways to describe or talk about some one with an other skin colour or with an other tan.

The same for those who are not of the original place, which in the past could be called “non-locals” a “foreigner” or  “allochtoon” (“allochttones”), but that last word has become a jinx not to be used any more. Even “stranger” may not be used and some find “immigrant” also offensive for all those who enter now the country. (Nobody dared to use the old word “alien”, but perhaps it once could return again. – joke)

Today the problem also arises by people who have a certain disorder or a handicap. In English that may be an offensive word for denoting  what until now was called a ‘person with a physical or mental  disability’, but this may not be said either today. We can find already people who shiver  when the word “disabled” is used. As such one could say

 He lost his leg when he was ten, but learnt to overcome his handicap.

It was considered that when something happened to a person which caused to weaken a person or got him so gravely damaged, or had the person diminish, as in quality:

an injury that impaired hearing/seeing/walking

English: Handicap sign , Dryden, Ontario, Canada

Handicap sign , Dryden, Ontario, Canada (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The handicap or impairment, disability, disorder, defect, ailment, afflictioninfirmity, disablement, for many was or is considered so negative that except affliction, they may not be used any more, and handicap may only be used for  the advantage or disadvantage in a sportsgame.

a contest, esp a race, in which competitors are given advantages or disadvantages of weight, distance, time, etc., in an attempt to equalize their chances of winning

or in Golf the number of strokes by which a player’s averaged score exceeds the standard scratch score for the particular course: used as the basis for handicapping in competitive play {The Free dictionary Encyclopedia on ‘handicap’}

Some people are against the words handicap and disabled. Some would take up the larger cause of having become “differently-abled” rather than being disabled. But that “play on words” has not been all welcomed, as some consider it offensive.

The question is for many is a person in the quality or state of being infirm. Infirmity implying that the person would be personal failing:  foible. Many start considering when speaking about a disabled person or some one in infirmity this would or should mean one considers that person like having something negative or bad; a negative or bad affection, ail, ailment, bug, complaint, complication, condition, disorder, distemper, distemperature, fever, ill, illness, disease, malady, sickness, trouble one does not want to be confronted with. and there lies the problem. It is more from the user of the word, the person looking at the person who is not like him, that we can see the issue being in the ego of that person, his selfishness not willing to come to be confronted with something which has a connotation with something negative or bad which also could come over him or her. It is more that when using such word it could become to him or her as well as a contagion, contagious disease; contagium, infection; attack, bout, fit, spell; debility, decrepitude, feebleness, frailness, lameness, sickliness, unhealthiness, unsoundness, unwellness, weakness; malaise, matter, pip; epidemic, pest, pestilence, plague.

We have come to live in a time and society where there is no place at all for feebleness and frailness, or infirmity. Physical weakness or debility, frailty is totally shunned. One does not want to see or to be confronted with people with a quality or state of being infirm; feebleness or weakness.

Those who use the words “differently abled” often see the terms “disabled” or “disability” as potentially hurtful or offensive. Today for many it is a taunting to use “Dis” which means “not,” and includes a negative look at some one or something. So calling someone “dis-abled” must mean that a person is “not-able” or even “unable to do anything,” “incapable of ever doing anything functional or useful or desirable either by others or by themselves,” and therefore, it is wrong to call people disabled. There are people who find we could talk about challenged, differently abled, or exceptional people, but for sure should never speak about impaired or incapacitated people, but they do not like the use of ‘disabled‘ either, though this was just a few years ago the clear preference in contemporary American English for referring to people having either physical or mental impairments, with the impairments themselves preferably termed disabilities.

more recent coinages such as differently abled or handicapable tend to be perceived as condescending euphemisms and have gained little currency. · The often-repeated recommendation to put the person before the disability would favor persons with disabilities over disabled persons and person with paraplegia over paraplegic. Such expressions are said to focus on the individual rather than on the particular functional limitation, and they are therefore considered by many to be more respectful. See Usage Note at handicapped. {The Free dictionary on ‘disabled‘}

De Kreupelen- The Cripples, Pieter Bruegel, 1568

Taking the “negative” term to mean a negativity over the whole line is what brings us in problems. Lots of people can not see the “dis” or “not” does not have to be a “non” over the whole line but can denote part of the matter, partly not able to do certain things, instead of not at all being able to do things. In Bible-translations the words ‘crippled‘ and ‘lame‘ came under discussion and like ‘maimed‘ they are not considered appropriate any more to be used. And many do not want to use the word ‘mutilated‘ either for damaged people. at the moment nobody has yet given objection to the word ‘bedridden‘, but with the amount of elderly bounded to the bed this can perhaps soon change.

All that what we call ‘political correctness’ is going to make life so much difficult. Why not call the things by their name and allow to have many synonyms be used by all people? It are those who see something bad in it who have a negative mind, and not the other way round.

Writer, dreamer, activist/organizer, and speaker/educator Lydia X. Z. Brown writes

Speaking from a purely objective standpoint, we as humans are all differently abled from one another. Some people are better at math than other people. Some people are better at public speaking than other people. Some people are better at cooking or even remembering to cook than other people. Some people walk and some do not, and of those people who do walk, not everyone walks in the same way. {How “Differently Abled” Marginalizes Disabled People}

This is something we do have to accept and have to live with. We as human beings do have to accept that we all may be different, though we are all created in the same image of God. In each of us is something which is a high quality and something of lesser quality. We have all our good and our bad points.

Today with the political correctness we can see that many have become afraid to use a certain word because some may come to implement an other meaning to it than they or some may become offended by the use of such word. By looking for a language that seems intended to give the least amount of offence, especially when describing groups identified by external markers such as race, gender, culture, or sexual orientation. No wonder the concept of political correctness has been discussed, disputed, criticized, and satirized by commentators from across the political spectrum and from the cultural and social field, because such looking for new words and doing away with accustomed words shall make it in the end impossible to just use one word or one term. Altering language usage can change the public’s perceptions and beliefs as well as influence outcomes but also contributes to the idea that one or an other word would be bad to use and has to be considered as offensive, and giving the idea to people that in the past those whoo used such a word had such twisted mind as the people who use that word today in the negative sense.

Those people who press to change the use of certain words are often people who themselves desire to eliminate exclusion of various identity groups based on language usage and or would love to target certain groups to reach their goal to exclude or include certain groups of people. We also may not forget that language also reveals and promotes our biases and that people are eager to make use of it to give their opinion over others.

Many people may forget that their word itself may be not the ideal word and would have a lot to be against it. that is proven by the words ‘neger, ‘niger’ and ‘negro’, when once this was seen as the more polite form to denote a dark skinned person it became a term of abuse and a nickname not to be used.

Today we see also that several people prefer to use the term “differently abled” for some one who does not look to have the same qualities as the mainstream citizen. The term “differently abled” used to refer to an individual disabled person is euphemistic. The intentions of the demander of another word may be polite or genteel. But often they do not manage with their mild, indirect, or vague term for one that is considered harsh, blunt, or offensive to find a resolute solution which can hold for many years. With the new term, proposed today we also find it is borderline cutesy and it diminishes the actual experiences of disabled people.

It suggests that the term disability should be uncomfortable and therefore should be avoided. What this does is further increase stigma against disabled people by discouraging discussion about disability and what it means to be disabled.

rightly writes an autistic and multiply otherwise neurodivergent and disabled, queer, asexual-spectrum, genderqueer/non-binary and sometimes read as feminine, and transracially and transnationally adopted east asian person of color from China (into a white adoptive family) person by the name Lydia X. Z. Brown, who also works to examine and challenge the privilege and power she holds as someone raised with middle and upper-middle class money privilege, a U.S. citizen and native English speaker, fairly light-skinned and mostly able-bodied (as hearing, sighted, and walking), raised in a deeply religious and engaged Christian community, educated in a private college and now in law school. She also has a fellow autistic activist/attorney who blogs at Silence Breaking Sound, and is mostly known in autistic/neurodiversity community for their work at the intersection of youth, disability, and queer/trans rights and justice.

Français : Tournoi Ultimate Fauteuil Handicap ...

Tournoi Ultimate Fauteuil Handicap International Nantes (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Wanting to put labels on everybody and on everything is something which has always been. Though in the past is was considered to be labelling people whilst now lots of people say they do not want to label people and therefore want to get rid of all possible connection of labelling.

using the term “differently abled” to refer to disabled people actually reinforces the idea that there is one normal way to be human — that there is one normal way to move, one normal way to communicate, one normal way to sense, one normal way to feel, one normal way to learn, and one normal way to think. It does not perform its intended purpose of suggesting that all people are different and that this is okay.

writes the author of Autistichoya.

R.H. (Rusty) Foerger who was born to immigrant parents in certain countries would be looked at with askance. Only because he was not originally belonging to that place where he lives know he would be looked at with disapproval, suspicion, or distrust. Raised by a widow since he was 15 months old after his father died in a car crash in rural Alberta he once more had a negative point for others when confronted with him. Over 30 years ago he met an East Indian woman with whom he serves as marriage mentors and teachers in their local church, where they have raised their now three adult children.

Having been been a lay pastor, teacher, missionary and mentor for over 30 years he recently retired after 33 years as a senior officer from the fire service, where, for most of his career, Rusty worked with families with children who set fires. (You can follow his writing on his blog called “More Enigma than Dogma” to explore “the enigma of our worth” and a prayer blog he curates titled, “Curriculum of the Spiritual Life.”

In his  previous occupation, on occasion he worked with burn survivors who would tell their story to allow students to emotionally grasp the outcomes of fire and burns gone wrong. He came to the conclusion that

Many burn survivors (survivors are adamant about not being called “victims”- since they continue to survive their burns) endure their burn injuries due to no fault of their own, but nevertheless have something to say about pain, burn prevention, and the permanent change to their lives. {Trans-ability and Identity}

In this day and age where we have so many cars on the roads and so many machinery at workplaces we are able to find lots of people who were confronted by the dangers of traffic and by the danger of those electronic monsters which do not stop when human flesh enters their big mouth.

Fires have always been part of human fears. Always there have been lives lost, but also people who could survive though in terrible conditions.

The person who tried to come to rescue when fires broke out has now entered the third third of life and is becoming aware of the role of elders today

“to enlarge spiritual vision, being devoted to prayer, living in the face of death, as a living curriculum of the Christian life” (Dr. James M. Houston).

He who is a life long and life wide learner who seeks to: *decipher the enigma of our worth *rescue from the agony of prayerlessness *integrate spiritual friendship, found burn survivors massively brave and fortified by surviving the initial burns, and the ongoing tortuous burn treatments – among the most painful a person can tolerate.

Burn survivors are not changed merely in appearance by their full thickness epidermis burns; their lives have changed relationally, and in ability. {Trans-ability and Identity}

He confesses that he too find it difficult to keep up with political correctness and the reasons for changing terms.

On the surface, innocently enough, the idea of promoting “differently-abled” was to focus on abilities that are “there” rather than those that are “not.” Thus organizations like the Excel Society state their vision as “Enriching Lives by Enabling Potential.” The word “able” plays into a lot of the thinking in order to “enrich” peoples’ lives. {Trans-ability and Identity}

He continues

In these days of our massive identity crises, in comes the new phrase and phenomenon of being “transabled.” Sarah Boesveld explains more in her article, Becoming disabled by choice not chance:

‘We define transability as the desire or the need for a person identified as able-bodied by other people to transform his or her body to obtain a physical impairment,’ says Alexandre Baril, an academic who will present on ‘transability’ at the Congress of the Social Sciences and Humanities at the University of Ottawa.

It is breathtakingly irrational for “abled-bodied” persons to deliberately “dis-able” themselves under the misbegotten notion that they are “trans-abled.” Surely this stretches the boundaries of identity beyond any sensible limits. And what can be said for doctors’ whose ethic somehow allow them to amputate limbs of able-bodied persons? Did they miss that class on the Hippocratic Oath?

Boesveld reports that “Researchers in Canada are trying to better understand how transabled people think and feel. Clive Baldwin, a Canada Research Chair in Narrative Studies who teaches social work at St. Thomas University in Fredericton, N.B., has interviewed 37 people worldwide who identify as transabled.”

Baldwin insists that ‘We have to move away from pathologyzing people and appreciating the very real distress [transabled people] experience…’

Some of his study participants do draw parallels to the experience many transgender people express of not feeling like they’re in the right body. Baldwin says this disorder is starting to be thought of as a neurological problem with the body’s mapping, rather than a mental illness…

He suggests this is just another form of body diversity — like transgenderism — and amputation may help someone achieve similar goals as someone who, say, undergoes cosmetic surgery to look more like who they believe their ideal selves to be. {Trans-ability and Identity}

When referring to groups of people, there is nothing inaccurate with saying that within the group, each person is differently abled. This is true regardless of how many able or disabled people are in the group. It looks that today many people are afraid to be confronted with the reality of not everybody being the same or coming from the same background.

In 2015 Rachel Dolezal, the now infamous civil rights activist, made headlines in June because she misled people about her race. She identified as black, even though she is not of African-American descent. As a child she was a pale, straight-haired blonde, but then  her hair was dark and tightly woven, and her skin deeply tanned.

Hillary Crosley Coker, who describes herself as a light-skinned black woman, on Jezebel wrote

“You can fudge how people may see you … but you’re still born of your parents’ racial makeup, and Rachel Dolezal’s is Czech, Swedish, and German.”

For in her opinion,

“ethnicity isn’t something one can really move in and out of physically or mentally.”

Margaret Wente of The Globe and Mail wrote

These are funny times. Anyone who substituted “gender” for “race,” and said those things about Caitlyn (née Bruce) Jenner, would have been denounced from the rooftops as a hate-spewing bigot.

Instead, Ms. Jenner was lionized for her bold, courageous embrace of her true identity. No one dared accuse her (in the elite media, at any rate) of masquerading as a woman. Race may not be malleable, but obviously gender is. Enlightened people have decided that if a man feels like a woman, he’s a woman. {Race and gender: I feel therefore I am}

The whole race and gender matter made us in France and Belgium, as teachers, security officers and/or social workers not to call parents by the title ‘father’ or ‘mother’. Somebody in charge of a community  may be accused for being offensive or not willing to accept the liberty of gender when using those old familiar words for those who are at the head of a family … or should we say “where” at the head of a family.

Some may look at the want of being of an other sex to be something wrong or not appropriate, an illness or disfuntion in the brains or consider it as a disability. Others consider suchpeople wanting to change themselves as people who want to take on a disability.

The author of “the best of social justice” (blog), who wants to write about transability and self-identifies as being “disabled in some way,” looks at the

The Tumblr Transabled (who) sit on the internet and moan about how the disabled have things so much easier, and how we’re so lucky to be actually disabled. {Why “transabled” is bull}

notes that

most of the people claiming to be transabled choose deafness, blindness, or paralysis. All of those things can be romanticized, and I suspect that is part of the problem. I have not seen a single person claiming to be transabled in terms of depression, chronic pain, postural orthopedic tachycardia syndrome, or any other non-romanticized illness. I have never seen a transabled person whine about catheters, shots, pills, or literally anything else that affects people who are legitimately disabled. They have this view of disability existing on its own; they don’t see/think about the medical bills, inaccessibility, and condescension that is part of being disabled, and they can not say that they do because those are things they haven’t faced. The condescension and irritation leveled at the transableds is not the same thing as the anger and pity the disabled face every day. “People in wheelchairs are a drain on society” is a pretty common view. {Why “transabled” is bull}

She writes rather sardonically:

So, other than the perceived romanticism of certain disabilities (which I think of as Helen Keller Syndrome [sic]), why do people want to be disabled?

Part of it, I think, is Tumblr’s environment. Everything has a label on Tumblr. There are so many different types of romantic and sexual attraction I can’t keep up, and romanticism/sexuality isn’t alone. People label themselves with phobias, mental diagnoses, phobias, sexuality, sensuality, romanticism, gender, sex, pronouns, age, MBTI types, literally anything they can think of to make themselves seem interesting. It’s a constant strange contest

The overlabeling phenomena has led to what some call ‘special snowflaking’, whereby people feel the need to peacock every bit of their deviation from the norm in order to gain attention. It’s become almost a Strangeness Olympics, with points added for difference and docked for similarity. This is not being who you are, it’s announcing that YOU ARE SPECIAL! {Why “transabled” is bull}

How common are specific disabilitiesAll should know that disability is something to be avoided as much as possible, and when somebody is limited by what he or she can do with her body and/mind, there should be looked for ways to integrate in the contemporary working society.  Still we do have to consider a misfortune when people have something which the majority of the population would not consider a ‘normal’ thing. When a person is or has become disabled, it is something to be dealt with. It is not something to be coveted or pitied. Disability is part of who we are, but it is not something we chose to be. Who would choose to be depressed, or in constant pain, or in a body that refuses to obey commands, or who would love not being able to hear or to see? Though not feeling to be in the right body we would never consider to be a form of disability however it is also ‘not being able to be’ something or some one.

In that respect we should allow all people to be what they want to be and to give full respect in whatever they might choose to be and surely to consider a person who got something bad over him or her to see him or her as a full being, yet not able to do everything like lots of people would love it, still able to do lots of things and some even much better than those who we call able citizens.

How people look at those who are different is something which has to be learned from childhood. Therefore it is not bad that the industry takes this in account.

It is not bad more and more we can also find in toys puppets which have no arms or legs or who show some deformity in their body. In April 2015 after UK journalist Rebecca Atkinson noticed the lack of disability representation in toys she established #ToyLikeMe® and hoped crowdfunding would help to reach the necessary goals to be productive enough.


Rebecca had spent nearly 20 years working in TV production and print journalism (including Children’s BBC) and had always been interested in the way these industries represent disabled people, but this was the first time she had noticed the lack of representation in the toy industry. She called on some fellow mothers, and with their help, launched #ToyLikeMe on Facebook and Twitter to call on the global toy industry to start representing the 150 million disabled children worldwide. Read the full story in a Guardian newspaper article here.

 

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Previous articles

Why I’m Angry

The Real ‘Choice’

Lessons I have learned

A quadruped amputee not stopped from wanting to achieve her dreams

I will not be defined

Though disabled in the eyes of society able to do great things

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Additional reading

  1. New articles for October 2011
  2. Living with some type of physical disability in the U.S.A.
  3. A boy named Lou

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Further related articles

  1. Political Correctness: Mission Impossible?
  2. The Sick, Our Everyday Heroes
  3. Delivering a Diagnosis
  4. Much in the capital city eludes the physically challenged
  5. Brands for a cause: Maltesers
  6. Mum adapts dolls to have disabilities so that ALL children can have toys that are ‘just like them’
  7. Our Most Notable and Favorite Disability Articles for the Week Ending January 6, 2017
  8. Don’t Forget…
  9. I’ve Moved
  10. Meet Houssaine: The Story of a Disabled Tourist Guide
  11. Its Own Kind of Joy
  12. The Things They Don’t Want To See.
  13. January 13, 2017-Lessons from a Disabled Cat
  14. Just Connie’s Year #12 : Dance Class!
  15. My Vision….not really knowing
  16. Letters To My Countrymen
  17. Melania Trump, Astrosplained

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