Tag Archives: Holy Week

Making sure we express kedusha for 14-16 Nisan

Over a a few weeks for lovers of God, the most important days of the year shall have us to bring to remember how God provided salvation from slavery of man but also of slavery of death. Though both where installed by a covenant of bloodshed, one of the firstborns of the old world, the other by the firstborn of the new world, the second Adam.

This image was selected as a picture of the we...

This image was selected as a picture of the week on the Czech Wikipedia for th week, 2007. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Being the most set apart or holy days of the year, we should take care that our house does not get defiled by the wrong objects. In our living quarters non Jews and not real Christians should notice the typically absent are specifically “other” objects such as wicker baskets of chocolate Easter eggs and/or painted eggs and chocolate bunnies, or bacon and its smell.

Prohibited, and hence placed out of sight or otherwise rendered out-of-commission in particular times and places, are in some Jewish homes: bread and flour on Pasch/Pasach or Passover. (According to the Kitnot)

Coming closer to those special days and holy week, we can prepare ourselves for that grand memorial time. The coming days we can try to cleanse our body and soul (i.e. our full being).

We should make sure that every thing around us shall be able to embody, create, and express kedushah [holiness] by their actual presence, by a hidden presence of which one is consciously or subliminally aware, and also by the whole range of interactions to which such objects are subject or suggest and provoke. We should know that we do have to participate in the fulfilment of mitzvot, the commandments,  which should be engraved deep in our hearts.

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Preceding article

Christianity like Judaism God’s call to human responsibility

The Evolution Of Passover–Past To Present

Easter: Origins in a pagan Christ

It takes guts to leave the ruts

Reciting the Aleinu as a warning against temptation of idolatry

Commemorating the escape from slavery

The Last Supper was a Passover meal

A Single Seder, and Around the World

Thoughts on Passover

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Additional reading

  1. First month of the year and predictions
  2. Seven Bible Feasts of JHWH
  3. Holidays, holy days and traditions
  4. Remember the day
  5. Shabbat Pesach service reading 1/2
  6. Shabbat Pesach service reading 2/2
  7. Easter holiday, fun and rejoicing
  8. Why we do not keep to a Sabbath or a Sunday or Lord’s Day #2 Testimony
  9. Why we do not keep to a Sabbath or a Sunday or Lord’s Day #3 Days to be kept holy or set apart
  10. Yom Hey, Eve of Passover and liberation of many people
  11. A Passover for unity in God’s community
  12. Pesach and a lot of brokenness in the world
  13. On the first day for matzah
  14. 14 Nisan a day to remember #3 Before the Passover-feast
  15. 14 Nisan a day to remember #4 A Lamb slain
  16. 14 Nisan a day to remember #5 The Day to celebrate
  17. A Great Gift commemorated
  18. Anointing of Christ as Prophetic Rehearsal of the Burial rites
  19. A Messiah to die
  20. An unblemished and spotless lamb foreknown
  21. The Song of The Lamb #5 Revelation 5
  22. The Song of The Lamb #7 Revelation 15
  23. This day shall be unto you for a memorial and you shall keep it a feast to the Most High God
  24. Exodus 9: Liar Liar
  25. Geert Wilders wants mandatory blackface at Dutch festival
  26. Like grasshoppers
  27. White Privilege Conference (WPC) wanting to keep the press out for obvious reasons

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Further reading

  1. Equinox, Easter and the arrival of Spring in Austria
  2. Easter Eve
  3. Easter: Holiday of the devil
  4. Wordless Wednesday – Egg-straordinary Eggs
  5. Painted easter eggs
  6. Celebrating Easter in Romania
  7. Stampin Friends Easter Hop
  8. 7 Mind Blowing Facts About Easter You Probably Didn’t Know!
  9. The “Bunny Song”
  10. A holiday
  11. I got nuttin!
  12. Annual Passover Gathering
  13. 19 March 2017 Bible Reading
  14. Lenten Meditation: Never as Planned
  15. Why The Seder?
  16. Passover Stuffed Cabbage
  17. Mar 19 God’s Plan
  18. Passover is coming and the strangers in our midst need help (Part 1 of 2)
  19. Am I Ready To Hear What God Says?
  20. The Way Ahead
  21. Shabbat Ki Tisa 5777 Parashat Parah–This Is Not Bull
  22. Matzo Project 5777 Will Fulfill Your Passover Unleavened Fantasies
  23. To bean or not to bean, that is the question!
  24. For Real, How Rare Is a Red Heifer?
  25. Matzah, Matzo, Matzoh
  26. It’s time to start thinking about Pesach!
  27. Autonomy, Individualism & Sincerity, #inspired for the whole year!
  28. Jennifer Abadi’s Turkish Style Harósi 

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Living in the Wilderness

This holy week having celebrated 14-15 Nisan we had also lots of time to think about those people who were liberated but refused to see the light and kept complaining about futilities, not wanting to see the greater things.

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By not wanting to see further than the length of our nose, we also often are in the dessert, feeling more the loneliness and the cold instead of feeling the heath and seeing the sun shine.
Having had these special days to think about the love of the Most High Elohim Hashem Jehovah, we should make a commitment to remember Him more this year and to try to come closer to Him, Whom we should trust with all our heart.

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To remember or to question:
  1. do we know where we came from
  2. do we know where we are going
  3. do you think of the wilderness as a good place.
  4. wilderness is not only a place of uncertainty (not knowing where you are going), it is also the place where people encounter God.
  5. Hagar the maid servant of Sarah; Moses who fled into the wilderness after he killed the Egyptian; the Israelites when they entered the wilderness after crossing the Red Sea; they ran into the wilderness not knowing where they were going but met God and God spoke.
  6. descendants too numerous to count
  7. trust God for your daily bread
  8. God’s peace passes all understanding and keeps heart and mind in Christ Jesus
  9. Gods = cool drink of water in wilderness
  10. God’s grace = manna from heaven – it nourishes soul
  11. God’s grace gives peace
  12. God will meet you there! God will speak!
  13. Listen! Hear Him say – “my Grace is sufficient”.

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Preceding post: Getting out of the dark corners of this world

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Additional reading:

  1. What loneliness is more lonely than distrust?
  2. A Holy week in remembrance of the Blood of life
  3. Passover and Liberation Theology

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  • Jesus in the Wilderness (maranathayoga.com)
    Lent is the time of year before Easter when we remember the 40 days Jesus spent in the desert before he began his ministry. Jesus had just been baptized by John the Baptist. In Luke 4:1 it says, “Jesus, full of the Holy Spirit, returned from the Jordan, and was led by the Spirit into the wilderness.” So, newly baptized, Jesus is full of the Holy Spirit. He is led BY the Holy Spirit into the Wilderness. Most scholars feel the place called “wilderness” means what is now named the Mount of Temptation. It is in the Judean desert, in the southern part of Israel, close to the Dead Sea.During the preparation for His ministry, Jesus spent 40 days and 40 nights in the desert. He fasted and prayed.
  • The Wilderness of Sin (joshuamcelhaney.wordpress.com)
    As I read of Israel’s journey out of Egypt, I see an all too familiar scene unfold in Exodus 16. Israel has only been out of Egypt for 2 months when the Bible says that Israel found themselves in a wilderness of Sin. I am of the opinion, that once God brings you out of Egypt, you will find a wilderness of sin along your journey towards Canaan. Oh I’d love to tell you that Canaan comes immediately after Egypt, but truth be told there is a journey that must be traveled!
  • Moses Got Screwed Out Of Passover (yidwithlid.blogspot.com)
    The “instructions manual”  for the Seder is called the Haggadah, a book that contains the narrative of the Israelite Exodus from Egypt, special blessings and rituals, commentaries from the  Sages, and special Passover songs. Seder customs include drinking four cups of wine, eating matza, partaking of symbolic foods placed on the Passover Seder Plate (bitter herbs, hard boiled eggs, etc), and reclining while we eat to act as free people. In my house that is supplemented with song parodies, stupid parlor tricks (like changing water into blood) and family discussion about the meaning of the freedoms given to us by God.
  • Maundy Thursday & the Last Seder (christiannoob.wordpress.com)
    I’m not the only one who’s thought about this possible relationship. I found several articles on this same topic.

    1. Was Jesus’ Last Supper a Seder? by Jonathan Klawans (10/18/2012)
      http://www.biblicalarchaeology.org/daily/people-cultures-in-the-bible/jesus-historical-jesus/was-jesus-last-supper-a-seder/
    2. Was the Last Supper a Passover Seder? (no author name, 01/01/2001)
      http://www.bible.org/question/was-last-supper-passover-seder
    3. Was Jesus’ Last Supper a Passover Seder? by Michael J. Cook (Spring 2013)
      http://www.reformjudaismmag.org/Articles/index.cfm?id=3175

    I’m surprised I haven’t really thought about it before.

  • Sustenance for the Wilderness Journey (inkindle.wordpress.com)
    I feel like I’ve been walking in the wilderness lately, and God has sent me bread from Heaven.  The encouraging, sustaining words from some of my praying friends are strengthening me in the journey.
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    The truth is, “old things have passed away. Behold, all things have become new.” In my life it is more like they are becoming new. Praying for (him) to walk in newness of life as he draws closer to the Comforter in his pain.
  • Led into the Wilderness (wherefaithmeetsreallife.wordpress.com)
    The Judaean Wilderness is describable….but it’s also a lot like taking pictures of amazing sunsets or epic snowfalls. Never does them justice. True perspective and definition get lost in the translation both verbally and on film. At some point, the person(s) trying to do the explaining of all that grandeur will finally come to the same conclusion….for the full effect, you just had to be there yourself.
  • The History and Origins of Easter (personalcreations.com)
    Easter, which celebrates the resurrection from the dead of Jesus Christ, is a holiday actually based on an ancient Pagan ritual. Unlike most holidays, Easter does not fall on the same set date each year. Instead, Christians in the West celebrate Easter on the first Sunday after the full moon of the vernal equinox on March 21. Therefore, Easter is celebrated each year between March 22 and April 25. The exact origins of Easter are unknown, but some sources believe that the word “Easter” is taken from the Teutonic goddess of fertility and spring – Eostre. Easter has also been traced to the Latin words Hebdomada Alba – meaning white week – referencing Easter week in which white clothing is worn by people who get baptized.The Pagan ritual of the Spring Equinox is a celebration of renewed life and the change that comes with spring. This solar festival is celebrated when the length of the day and the length of the night are equal, which occurs twice a year at the spring and fall Equinox. Throughout history, this turn in the seasons has been celebrated by various cultures that had held festivals in honor of their gods and goddesses at these times of the year. Today, Pagans continue to celebrate spring and attribute the change of the seasons to the powers of their god and goddess – also portrayed as The Green Man and Mother Earth.
  • Wilderness Wanderer (istellorton.wordpress.com)
    We have a tendency to describe our emotional or spiritual state in terms of the seasons.  But a long conversation with a friend, over several cups of coffee, made me think differently.  Maybe, just maybe what we describe as a winter season is actually a wilderness experience.Physically the wilderness is a place where the climate is arid, a place of barrenness, deep distress and loneliness.  The wilderness is a hostile, potentially deadly environment and has a reputation for supporting very little life.  Spiritually the wilderness, according to Henri Nouwen is “the place of the great struggle and the great encounter”.  The wilderness was, and still is the setting for divine acts of grace, revelation, nurture, preparation and intense encounters with God.  It is a place of wonder, silence and spiritual renewal.
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    Remember that the wilderness is not your final destination, but while you are doing some wilderness wandering may you know that The Lord will guide you always; he will satisfy your needs in a sun-scorched land and will strengthen your frame and you will be like a watered garden and like a stream that never runs dry (Isaiah 58:11).
  • Parshat Beshalach: Let Them Eat Manna (acquiescere9.wordpress.com)
    In the desert the people suffer thirst and hunger, and repeatedly complain to Moses and Aaron. G‑d miraculously sweetens the bitter waters of Marah, and later has Moses bring forth water from a rock by striking it with his staff. He causes manna to rain down from the heavens before dawn each morning, and quails to appear in the Israelite camp each evening.
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    The main event of the “Giving of the Torah” at Sinai is recounted in next week’s parshah of Yisro (and also in the ensuing parshah of Mishpatim, as well as partially in Va-Eschanan, the second parshah of Deuteronomy). However, the lessons learned by the Children of Israel in All their wanderings in the Wilderness are integral parts of this same Torah, as in this week’s parshah of Beshalach, which begins to relate their encounter with the harsh reality of the Wilderness after the exuberance of the Exodus.
  • Women of the Word: Hagar (virtuousgirls.wordpress.com)
    In Genesis 16 and Genesis 21:8-21, we come across the story of Hagar. Hagar was the slave girl of Sarai (later Sarah), who was the wife of Abram (later Abraham). God had promised Abraham and Sarah that they would have a child and He would make of them a great nation. But they were very, very old and not quite sure they could bear a baby. Abraham and Sarah believed God but their faith sometimes wavered and doubt often clouded their hope.
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A Terebinth

While part of a Rabbinical studies group last year, the Rabbi was talking about the Israelites and their relationship to the wilderness. And how the wilderness has greater meaning – like most things in the Jewish culture, than just being a place where they wondered for 40 years. For the Israelites, the wilderness is this place that symbolizes that time when you know where you’ve come from but you don’t know where you’re going. And it is in that place where you encounter God. It’s that place where God comes to you and reveals Himself to you in new ways. Jordan-wilderness-e1324397675349

Over the last couple of weeks I’ve been thinking a lot about the wilderness and the journey that Terry and I are on with our kids. We are definitely in the wilderness right now. We know where we came from – we just don’t know where we are going –…

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