Tag Archives: Falling

It´s not how you fall, but how you standup

Niet hoe je valt, wel hoe je opstaatThere is a beautiful text by Peter Handke in which he says ‘Fail calmly’. Fail, yes. Calmly, no. We did not learn that it is o.k. to fail. Let alone that we stay calm while failing. To fail calmly is an art of living, a constant balancing between trying, exercising, and daring to stumble.

Daring to stumble is showing your vulnerability.
To show that you don’t know either.
Socrates already said : ‘I know that I don’t know’.
That wisdom is centuries old .
Why is it so difficult to take away the layer of veneer?
To show who you really are, hesitating and stumbling?

Maybe it helps when we choose.
To choose to dare.
To choose to love stumbling people.
To choose to surround yourself with warm people who do not reject you when you stumble, but who on the contrary reach out.
And to offer your own hand or shoulder when someone nearly falls.

To get up and continue.
It sounds simple, but you never do it alone.
On top of your restored self confidence  you need others.
Warm, encouraging others who also believe in your ability, your resilience and your talents.

To believe in yourself is to allow yourself to stumble.
Stumble calmly, struggle to get up and accept those hands, smooth your hairs and try again.
Not how you fall, but how you get up.

BzN-Mov Without a Name-Logo_EN

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Original Dutch version / Originele Nederlandstalige versie: Niet hoe je valt, wel hoe je opstaat

Preceding article:

Searching for fulfillment and meaning through own efforts, facing unsatisfaction and depression

Using failure

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Further reading

  1. The Fallacy of Failure
  2. failing 1
  3. Failing 2
  4. Failing 3
  5. Failing 4
  6. day 122 . failing
  7. Fail Like a Scientist
  8. Failing at life
  9. Failing to Grace
  10. Failing and Flailing
  11. Fear of Failure, Failure to Risk
  12. Can I take my time?
  13. What have we done?
  14. Still not perfect
  15. 5 Ways to Fail a Class
  16. Average???
  17. Acceptance: I’m A Failure!!! But I’m Working at it!
  18. Ch-ch-ch-ch-Changes
  19. Failing Fast
  20. Failing IS Part of Our Process
  21. Throwing out the cheese
  22. Two-Facedbook
  23. Is it bed-time yet?
  24. Making it to Xmas
  25. Smart Goals
  26. Mastering the art of quitting
  27. And Endless Downward Sloping Set of Stairs
  28. 7 Things People Don’t Realize You’re Doing Because You’re Afraid Of Failure
  29. “Negative Vibes”
  30. Why?!
  31. Why I Love Failing Just As Much As Succeeding
  32. I’ve got spirit, yes I do!
  33. what should you be?
  34. Reality Check
  35. One thing about Mark Zuckerberg you never knew
  36. Designed To Fail (& Grow)
  37. Fear Of Not Flying
  38. Once bitten
  39. The Countercultural Icon, #2
  40. Motivation Monday – Fear Edition!
  41. Life is hard. Send help
  42. The sun still rises even with the pain
  43. Learn To Strike Out
  44. One year older, one year…wiser?
  45. What’s At Risk When We Choose Not To Take A Risk?
  46. 365 Days Later
  47. 5 Lessons I’ve learned from 2016
  48. It wasn’t about me.

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Filed under Being and Feeling, Movement Without a Name

To be relapsing

  • What Is Bipolar Disorder? (doylene.wordpress.com)
    Bipolar disorder is a complex disorder that’s defined by dramatic or unusual mood episodes of highs and lows. The episodes of mania and depression can range from very mild to extreme in their intensity and severity. With bipolar disorder, mood episodes can come on gradually over many days or even weeks.
  • Insights Into Bipolar Disorder (thesecretkeeper.net)
    I do not want the meds but would rather work through “talk therapy” & alternative methods to accept what comes with Bipolar. I enjoy the creative highs and experience the depressive lows and the feelings of suicidal thoughts. But I want to learn to control th behaviors and feelings.)
  • Delight in Disorder (clothedbyjesus.wordpress.com) >Delight in Disorder
    As a society or as people in general we tend to judge or fear what we do not understand.  As mentioned before this is an area that many of us cannot wrap our heads around even if we know someone who is dealing with the complications that go along with it.  This is a great book to help demystify the sickness of the mind and help us accept people who are dealing with it.
  • I’m Writing About My Bipolar Disorder While I’m Learning to Live With It (theroot.com)
    My Thing Is: I’m a teacher with mental illness who’s living proof that everyone’s fighting a battle you know nothing about. That’s why I’ve decided to tell my story.
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    When the crisis worker comes to interview me to see if I’ll be admitted or not, he asks tons of questions. Do I do drugs? Did I do drugs at the concert last night? Am I sure I don’t do drugs? No heroin, cocaine, weed, cigarettes, alcohol? I answer a confident no. My vices are not drugs; they are sex and shopping.
  • We’re All Mad Here (websterhunny.wordpress.com)
    Vincent van Gogh was famous not only for his raw talent, but also for the passionate and emotional nature behind it. Van Gogh is known worldwide as “the crazy guy who cut his ear off”. Although this act was the one that made his madness known worldwide, van Gogh had a history of mental illness and ‘emotional fits’. Today, people believe that van Gogh suffered from bipolar disorder. Van Gogh isn’t the only creative genius believed to have bipolar disorder. Winston Churchhill and Edgar Allen Poe are also believed to have had bipolar disorder. Other artistic geniuses also suffer from psychological disorders, including Joanne Greenburg – depression along with somatization disorder – and Charles Dickens – clinical depression. Certain mental disorders – such as depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, etc – are more likely to be found in the “creative types”, such as writers, artists, and musicians.
  • All About World Bipolar Day (Video) (blogs.psychcentral.com)
    For World Bipolar Day on March 30, 2014, Matthew McKenzie of London, England created a video to celebrate and inform.It shares links and information about the three organizations hosting World Bipolar Day: the Asian Network of Bipolar Disorder, the International Bipolar Foundation, and the International Society for Bipolar Disorders, as well as other information about bipolar.

    Learn more about bipolar, share, and fight stigma.

  • Bipolar disorder and those that suffer from it (followinspire.wordpress.com)
    The different types of bipolar disorder are diagnosed based on the pattern and severity of manic and depressive episodes.  Doctors usually diagnose brain and behavior disorders using guidelines from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, or DSM. According to the DSM, there are four basic types of bipolar disorder:
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    Many people suffer from depression. Whether it is drug-related or just being introverted and obsessed with people pleasing.Bipolar is more black and white…no grey in the middle. They are either manic (up and full of energy) or down to where they stay depressed for days.

    Obsession, anxiety, panic, fear of losing friends and family, all these things related to being bipolar.

    If someone you know has these symptoms, please help get them help. Because without treatment they could either hurt themselves or others

  • I’m a slander. I’m a statistic. And my mania is your cocaine high, except mine is free: Embrace Imperfection, Achieve Greatness (thebipolarbastille.wordpress.com)
    In popculture we often refer to impulsive or contrary behavior as “bipolar.” Anytime someone acts out against societal norm or the appropriate reaction, they are bipolar. It has become a term of slander to insult someone for bad behavior. And these are all completely accurate stereotypes of someone who does actually have bipolar disorder, and unfortunately for the average joe you are slandering, he doesn’t reap the benefits.
  • What is bipolar disorder? (itv.com)
    Bipolar disorder, known in the past as manic depression, is a condition that affects people’s moods, which can swing from one extreme to another. People with bipolar disorder have periods of: Depression – where they feel very low and lethargic Mania – where they feel very high and overactive Les severe mania is known as hypomania
  • Mania Symptom Profile Changes with Age (manicmuses.wordpress.com)
    When I was young, my mania was a much more physical thing.  I’m amazed my family never tried to have me hospitalized.  I think my worst manic experience came when I was 21 or so.  I clearly remember driving like a lunatic in a 25 mph zone and daring myself to crash into a tree.  I almost did it, too.  I’ll never know what stopped me but that is the point where I decided I needed help and saw a doctor.

 

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Filed under Being and Feeling, Health affairs, Re-Blogs and Great Blogs