Tag Archives: Environmental Impact

Seeds to be planted soon

Last month was perhaps cold for many, but when we look at the calendar to plant things we can see that it is a great time to start planning what vegetable varieties will be grown in the garden. Having the flue now I am remembered of those who should have planted them end of January. Loving lots of green and colours in the garden I also know that now is a great time to get your spring flowers germinating and ready for spring! There are many different varieties of annuals and perennials with different grow times, which need your attention to grow times so that your flowers are ready to be planted after last frost. Below are some good varieties to start in January for a last frost in March and April!

For those who want to plant vegetables February is the month, though the cold does not seem to invite us to come outdoors.

Beans at the CIAT gene bank in Colombia, which...

Beans at the CIAT gene bank in Colombia, which has just sent its latest consignments of seeds for conservation at the Global Seed Vault in Svalbard, Norway. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

When we choose our seeds or plants it is important that we look at them not being ‘festered’ with. Man has come to love to play for god and to create all new sorts of plants. Genetically manipulated plants are something we should avoid at all cost.

When people muddle with the plants we can see the disastrous consequences.  Last Summer the harvest did show her grim face in Dunklin County where conveyor belts teem with peaches inside the packing facility at Bader Farms, where fruit is prepared for shipment from its Bootheel source to stores across a nearly 500-mile radius were seriously worried.

Of the 900 acres of peach trees that fill Bill Bader his orchards, some have limbs that are almost entirely defoliated, while countless others have tufts of leaves that are crinkled and yellow, or remain green but are full of holes.

“That’s why you come out here and look at them early in the morning, ’cause you don’t wanna think about them at night,”

Bader said, surveying a field of peach trees.

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Preceding

Seeds of promise

A bird’s eye and reflecting from within

Commemorating the escape from slavery

You’re Lighter Than Air~

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Additional reading

  1. World Agenda for Sustainability
  2. Forbidden Fruit in the Midst of the Garden 4
  3. Necessity of a revelation of creation 5 Getting understanding by Word of God 3
  4. Engaging the culture without losing the gospel
  5. Picking Stones
  6. Testify of the things heard
  7. Chemical warsite and Pushing king of the South

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Further reading

  1. Missouri Peach Farmers Threatened by Pesticide Drift
  2. Dicamba may threaten Missouri peach farm
  3. When to Start Your Seeds
  4. Seed calendar – What to plant now
  5. Seeds… how do they grow?
  6. Vegetable Gardening Know-How : Germination Temperatures & Times
  7. How to grow heirloom tomatoes from seed
  8. The Secret of germination That No One is Talking
  9. AboutGermination shelf
  10. Germination table coming together
  11. Inventory of WIP seeds
  12. Efficient planting, or notEffects of plant growth regulators and NaCl on early developmental stages of Striga hermonthica -IJAAR
    Don’t bother washing the hatPerfect Partners: Oaks & SquirrelsTime to Bloom!
  13. Beautiful yellow daffodils
  14. Hoping against hope
  15. Lightness of being
  16. The perfect soil!
  17. Good Soil (by Gail Ramesh)
  18. Good Soil (by Table Field Farm)
  19. Good soil (by Tokyo Purple girl)
  20. Good Ground, Bad Ground
  21. The Forty-Second Letter: The Basil Metaphor
  22. Success
  23. The Little Things
  24. sometimes the seed falls into good soil…
  25. Ungrateful Me
  26. Organic Fruit: Sermon for June 26, 2016
  27. Produce a Huge Harvest
  28. Sowed on Good Soil—Parable of the Sower
  29. Thorny ground
  30. Die to sin and grow: Analogy between you and a seed
  31. Longing to Stay Thirsty
  32. Women are important to Jesus

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Filed under Ecological affairs, Headlines - News, Health affairs, Nature, Religious affairs

Looking at man’s closest friend

When we look at those who walk on the street we can find many more people who start looking like a lot of people from over the Atlantic Ocean.

Every October 24, thousands of events all around the United States of America bring Americans together to celebrate and enjoy real food and to push for improved food policies. On that day they have a ‘Food Day‘ which has to inspire Americans to change their diets and their food policies. Nutritionists generally recommend eating a wide variety of foods; however, some groups of people survive on a very limited diet whilst others think they need to eat as much as possible of all sorts of stuff.  The theme for 2016 was “Toward a Greener Diet.”

That Greener diet is something what lots of Europeans should be looking too and why they were afraid for the American trade agreements. But having heard the bad news Donald Trump becoming the president, Europeans will have less fear they have to come to accepting the genetically manipulated products and seeing TTIP not going through.

But back to the four legged friends. Today we want to present Bailey who is a basset who likes sustainability and his boss Hannah who is a writer who likes bassets.

Like for human beings we can see that their four-legged friends often also could use some specific allowance or selection of food, esp prescribed to control weight or in disorders in which certain foods are contraindicated.

As a dog, that basset may not have a whole lot of food options

–it’s dry, brown meat-flavored bits day in and day out (with the occasional apple slice or piece of dropped chicken thrown in there). {Jump on the Local-motive!}

Fritz (Marcus Ampe his Shetland Collie)

Fritz (Marcus Ampe his Shetland Collie)

My Shetland Collie (Fritz) also to be happy with his dry brown crackly little bits of three different brands (two per day, at night always the same brand) and around the end of year some extra special health food to calm him down for the fireworks

Sometimes we can see the look in our dogs face

Why not for me?

He looking jealous for us, human beings, having an endless choice of nice looking dishes and great smelling products.

We ourselves do keep to as much as possible natural products and not much meat or fish. Our dog receiving more meat, dried lamb and dried chicken with his dried vegetables, every day, and when, in the season, we eat some wild meat (wild boar, roe deer, deer and pheasant) he is happy to receive some ‘real’ pieces of cooked meat (a big treat).

Like we try to limit the ecological footprint Bailey’s boss is also aware of the urgent need to look at where we get our food from.

Living in Asheville

There are about 1,000 reasons to choose local food when you can (that’s 7,000 in dog reasons), but I’ve got some napping to do in this lovely autumn sunlight, so I’ll give just a few of them here. {Jump on the Local-motive!}

I wonder how Baily was settling in to watch the outcome of this presidential election which could some of the European tummies turn around. Though on their site it was noted

Something to ponder–why is it so many candidates don’t list their views on the environment? Is it that they don’t care? Is it that it’s not important enough to voters for them to feel the need to do it? {America! – Great debate} (I love the picture of the dog with the Gaelic ale by her article)

Baily who likes sustainability also loves apple slices, like my dog, and sleeping on the couch. But mostly he wants to talk to you about sustainability. So perhaps it is not bad those from far away would also give him an ear and listen how he’s going to tell all about different sustainability projects happening in his town – greenways, community gardens, eco-houses, all kinds of great stuff.

And with every post I’ll share an easy sustainability tip that you can do right away. {I’m Bailey…}

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Carnivore Bailey who can hardly preach vegetarianism, but wants to shed a light on his and the humans their way of eating and handling nature

Being a very health-conscious basset he is well aware of the average American diet which is contributing to obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and other health problems – problems that land them in the hospital and cost Americans more than $150 billion per year.

Now having a man coming to steer the nation, who himself is not one of the leanest, but wants to have the American products on the first line, he and we can wonder how he is going to tackle all the pollution, the emission of the US companies he want to stimulate their production.

That other ‘carnivore’ becoming president who does not like to listen to others perhaps also listens to Bailey who knows that

a meat-heavy diet takes a terrible toll on the environment.

On the basset’s wise site you can find that he/she has written

Cattle on a pasture in Germany

about before, large-scale agriculture has a huge carbon footprint, and livestock farming is particularly hard on the environment. Four-fifths of the deforestation across the Amazon rainforest (where some of my more exotic cousins like the capybara and the golden lion tamarin live) could be linked to cattle ranching. Factory farms where pigs and other livestock are kept in very tight quarters can produce as much sewage waste as a small city (that’s a lot of poop!). On those farms they use lots of antibiotics to keep the animals healthy, but using those antibiotics creates antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria – bad news for humans and bassets.{Happy Food Day!}

More than half of the Shetland catch by weight...

More than half of the Shetland catch by weight and value is Mackerel. Shetland Islands Council (2010) pp. 16-17 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

For the better or the worse, the Americans and the rest of the whole world shall have to face a new president of the United States of America, who made his money by not being conscious about the environment and not willing to have an eye for the welfare of humans let withstand animals, so curious how Bailey and other animals in that world which made their choice these last few hours, shall look at the next coming four years, though at his first speech after it was known he would be the next president he mentioned

“two, three of four years”

whilst others in the past spoke about

my first term

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Find Baily and his boss her voice at: SustainaBailey

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Preceding articles

How to make sustainable, green habits second nature

What would you do if…? Continued trial

Building a low-carbon world: the sixth industrial revolution

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Additional reading

  1. Ecological economics in the stomach #1 Alarmbell
  2. European Guidelines and Low Carbohydrate Diets for Diabetes
  3. Organic Food
  4. Royals, mini busses and environment
  5. Wolves left in the cold

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Further reading

  1. Education | Result of Seminar, Food Day
  2. For the Love of Food
  3. For the Love of Food
  4. At the Fall/Winter 2016 Table
  5. An Apple A Day
  6. Nine and ten, begin again!
  7. An Ecological Footprint in Context
  8. Making the regenerative city
  9. What China’s Monumental Move to Cut Meat Could Mean for the Future of our Planet
  10. A startling result
  11. Walk this way …
  12. How You Can Reduce Your Ecological Footprint
  13. Regulars Complain About Popular NYC Restaurant’s Plan To Go Vegan – Why The Owner Doesn’t Care
  14. Food Technology That May Save The Planet: Plant Based Protein
  15. Don’t Want To Be A Vegan? Make One Change… Veggie Burgers
  16. Footprint Calculator – Global Footprint Network
  17. Help Save 45,000 Wild Horses From Being Killed
  18. Homemade = Less Money & Less Waste
  19. Environmentalist on a Budget
  20. A Step in the Right Direction: OTF “How Big is your Ecological Footprint?” Lesson Plan Review
  21. If Everyone Lived in an ‘Ecovillage’, the Earth Would Still Be in Trouble
  22. US Elections November 2016
  23. Is This Real Life?
  24. Donald Trump Crashes Hillary Clinton’s Presidential Dream After Historic Election Victory
  25. What have children learnt from the US election?
  26. Trump: Europe’s nightmare? Maybe we should take a breather.
  27. What Trump’s win means for the rest of the world
  28. How we can respond positively to the result of the Presidential election

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Filed under Ecological affairs, Health affairs, Political affairs

Building a low-carbon world: the sixth industrial revolution

To avoid destroying our relationship with the planet > need to make radical changes + revolutionise way we use energy + the type of energy we use.

 

Lord (Nicholas) Stern = former Chief Economist of the World Bank + Professor of Economics and Government at the London School of Economics + well known author of ‘The Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change’ published in 2007  > led the way in explaining the economic theory of climate change + author of the acclaimed book A Blueprint for a Safer Planet: how to manage climate change and create a new era of progress and prosperity, published in 2009.

5 industrial revolutions so far: mechanisation of textiles; steam; electricity and steel; automobiles; information technology (still going) + now we need an energy industrial revolution (the 6th revolution).

we have to achieve a decarbonised economy by 40 years from now.

Carbon energy consumption = destroy our relationship with the planet, if we don’t carry out radical changes to the way we use energy + the type of energy we use from now on.

  • At the current rate, the planet’s temperature might rise by 5 ˚C or even more by the end of this century, i.e. to levels not seen before on Earth for at least 30 million years.
  • Conceptual science predicted and measured GHG in the atmosphere long before now and there’s evidence that El Niño and La Niña events are more frequent now.

we need to make radical changes to the way we use energy and the type of energy we use, everywhere in the world and in every sector = Energy efficiency easiest way to start.

if we fail in managing climate change, we will fail to stop poverty

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Preceding articles

It’s a New Year!

Here and Now
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Dr Vera Lucia Barbosa's Environmental Blog

Nicholas-Stern_160x166 To avoid destroying our relationship with the planet, we’ll need to make radical changes and revolutionise the way we use energy and the type of energy we use. Are policies and people in networks and communities what will ultimately make it happen? I wrote this blog four years ago, when I was the editor for Environmental Impact and as such attended the Annual Dorchester Lecture, which was delivered by Lord Stern, at the Dorchester Abbey, Oxfordshire.

Lord (Nicholas) Stern is a former Chief Economist of the World Bank and he is a Professor of Economics and Government at the London School of Economics. He is well known as the author of ‘The Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change’ published in 2007 and which led the way in explaining the economic theory of climate change. He is also the author of the acclaimed book A Blueprint for…

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Filed under Ecological affairs, Economical affairs, Lifestyle, Re-Blogs and Great Blogs, Uncategorized, World affairs