Tag Archives: Emigration

Grounded

Daily we are surrounded by bad news-stories via the media (television and social media). All those terrible stories can weaken us and manage to bring fear to many (for no obvious reason, because they live far away from the trouble).

Often it is better to detach because it is not possible to live day to day if you spiral into all in the grief in the world. We have to be conscious about it, but may not close our eyes and ears for the beauties that are around us. And for sure there can be found a lot of beauty, even in the smallest thing.

Each of us can help to give others a feeling of safety and comfort in their own surroundings, accepting the wide variety of cultures that can go together anyway.
A person can not love the others without loving himself first and without wanting to share with others.

Today we can see that the fear for the unknown brings many to choose for extreme right wing political groups, which make use of the fear for other people and cultures, and bring the immigration in a wrong exaggerated light. Immigration, by the way, has been there for ages. It is nothing new. Every generation has come to know about some migration.

When we are willing to learn more about the world we and others live in we shall understand the different positions better and come to accept certain things much easier.

When each person is willing to come closer to the other, and is willing to open his mind to come to understand the other better, by willingness of openness of mind and heart the little environment we live in can change, but like a domino falling can bring something bigger changing too.

Let us always remember that a spiritual shaking is always safer than a real earth shaking.

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To remember

All through life when times get tough, when things start to run away with us or when things start to get too much we often hear the advice

“stay grounded.”

  • to balance us, to remind of something solid, something steady

how exactly do we stay grounded when we can’t even trust the ground we walk on?

  • on a little Greek island = best + worst moments of humanity play out on a daily basis => difficult to stay grounded

Facebook safety check icon > pictures of Parliament + London Bridge > horrors + pictures of frantic families trying to trace their missing children

  • a family connected by love
  • memories of places we love
  • distract ourselves from terrorism on our doorsteps with the escalating rhetoric of nuclear war between North Korea and the US?
  • watch white supremacists march the streets
  • ongoing refugee crisis on shores of Italy + Greece
  • hundreds of lives still lost in the Mediterranean
  • hundreds of lives trapped in camps + detention facilities > endless wait for asylum in Europe.

=> pretty hard to stay grounded

=> have become so desensitized

= not go to denial but keep our heads?

  • most important thing = not buy into all the hate.
  • majority of people = kind + loving
  • fear + when we are really scared => ignorance can lead to some pretty extreme standpoints on issues we never really felt too strongly about before.

== to stay grounded we need to start learning more about the world we live in + we need to discover how we can make change.

Stand together, show love where you find hate and don’t let fear win.

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Preceding

Going on holiday is… silence in your head

Summer holiday time to knock and ask, and time to share

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Additional reading

  1. Uncertainty, shame and no time for vacillation
  2. What is life?
  3. Immigration consternation
  4. Would you run
  5. Mountains of information, disinformation and breaking away
  6. Fearmongering succeeded and got the bugaboo a victory
  7. Fear of failure, and fear of the unknown
  8. I Am Not Alone – By: Kari Jobe
  9. Emotional pain and emotional deadness
  10. The soul has no rainbow if the eyes have no tears
  11. Not fear or dread or blind compulsion
  12. Can We Pay The Price To Free Humanity?
  13. The chosen ones to fear or not to fear
  14. Whom Shall I Fear (God of Angel Armies) by Chris Tomlin
  15. Prayer has comforted us in sorrow

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Further reading

  1. What Makes Me Bern about Fear
  2. Fear
  3. “… Fears…”
  4. Worry and Fear
  5. Fear, Surprise, Relief, What’s Next?
  6. Courage is not an absence of fear…
  7. What Fear Can Do To You.
  8. The Power Fear Holds Over Us
  9. Overwhelmed
  10. Anxious And Worried? Pray!
  11. Celebrate Victories Daily
  12. Change
  13. Face Your Fears | Choose Joys
  14. Italy: Migrants from Riace are to be resettled
  15. Criminalization of aid puts migrant lives at further risk
  16. Migration: 416,000 more people moved to Germany than emigrated
  17. After the Crisis? Reflections on Migration Governance
  18. Turkey slams developed nations over migration issue
  19. The migration which is changing the demography of India : The illegal migrants of Bangladesh
  20. The Year of Immigration theme seeks to create a renewed sense of community in College Park
  21. Szijjarto rejects the UN Migration compact
  22. Thousands flee due to crisis, Brazil deploys army to Venezuela border
  23. Parliament condemns the Sargentini Report
  24. Crosses Erected For Thousands Of Dead Immigrants Who Never Reached American Dream – Desert Graves

From Greece With Love

All through life when times get tough, when things start to run away with us or when things start to get too much we often hear the advice “stay grounded.” We are told to “keep our feet on the ground” to balance us, to remind of something solid, something steady that can help bring us down from those dizzying heights that challenging times can take us to. But what happens when that safety net fails, when you can no longer trust the earth to keep you steady?

Recently I experienced a rather nasty earthquake which has left this question playing on my mind. When we live in a world of such uncertainty, how exactly do we stay grounded when we can’t even trust the ground we walk on?

But this idea of losing trust in your surroundings goes further than a shift in tectonic plates, for me personally anyway. Over…

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Filed under Activism and Peace Work, Being and Feeling, Crimes & Atrocities, Lifestyle, Political affairs, Re-Blogs and Great Blogs, Reflection Texts, Social affairs, Welfare matters, World affairs

Anti-Semitic pressure driving Jews out of Europe

It can not go unnoticed, since a decade lots of Jews feel the pressure of the growing anti-Semitism and an aversion against the Divine Creator. Some even feel like it is again as in the 1930ies and the fear is great that Jews could be experiencing the most difficult situation they have encountered since the end of World War II.

Portrait de Francis Kalifat

Francis Kalifat, Président du Cirf

The Conseil Représentatif des Institutions Juives de France is fully aware of the bad situation and the 11th president of it looks at the present situation with Argus eyes. For him the Western world may not neglect the reason why we can see such a record emigration by Jews from France.

For him the year that lies before us is one full of challenges.

I hear pre-conceived ideas and dogma along with populist statements from some, and totalitarian reactions from more radical minds.

he says, looking at our society which is suffering and facing a climate of mistrust. Many French people are afraid or angry and democracy is on the back foot. According to an IPSOS survey taken in November last year, 32% of French people think that other political regimes would be equally effective. They long for a world of times gone by, looking for scapegoats and sweeping changes. This want to find a guilty one we can find back at several occasions in the past and today in many countries all over the world where the far right is gaining popularity.

Racist and anti-Semitic comments creep up out of the sewers, meeting an indifferent response or emerge from the online echo chamber of Facebook friends. And where there are disgraceful comments, there is always someone ready to laugh, offer approval or justification.

remarked Francis Kalifat, the Crif President at a speech at the annual Crif’s dinner 2017, where he said

When I take a step back, I am struck by a profound realisation: those in France who have a problem with Jews and Israel almost always have a problem with democracy, the rule of law and individual liberties. And vice-versa.

Ilan Halimi

Ilan Halimi (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Following the murder of Ilan Halimi in 2006 and the massacre at the Ozar Ha Torah school in Toulouse in 2012, anti-Jewish hatred once again reared its ugly head in France on 9th January 2015 and thus reinforced the feeling of solitude and abandonment that had started to engulf the Jewish community.

Partly because of anti-Semitic violence that included hundreds of anti-Semitic incidents annually in recent years, and dozens of physical assaults, lots of Jewish brethren ans sisters found it wiser to look for other pastures.

Since 2012, attacks on Jewish targets by French Islamists in France and Belgium claimed the lives of 12 people. Last year, roughly 8,000 French Jews left for Israel — the highest number on record for any year, which made France for the second year straight Israel’s largest provider of newcomers.

We heard already of certain quarters which got French names, because so many French people came to settle over there. According to figures seen by AFP in total, 40,000 French Jews have emigrated between 2006 and the end of 2016.

“The aliyah (the act of moving to Israel) of French Jews has been significant over the last decade,”

said Daniel Benhaim, who heads the Israeli-backed group in France, and agreed that insecurity had been a “catalyst” for many Jews who were already thinking of leaving.

The French Jewish community is the biggest in Europe and is thought to number around 500,000 people. In the 1970ies there where also a lot of Jews in Antwerp, but their number has decreased a lot.

Bruxelles rue des Minimes 21.jpg

The Jewish Museum of Belgium, between the Sablon in central Brussels and Brussels South, pictured in 2009

The Jewish communities form the Benelux and France were shocked in 2006 by the kidnapping and brutal anti-Semitic killing of a young Jewish man, Ilan Halimi, in the Paris suburbs, which was followed by a shooting in a Jewish school in the southwest city of Toulouse in 2012.
Two years later on 24 May 2014, in Brussels a gunman opened fire at the Jewish Museum of Belgium, killing four people. Three died at the scene; a fourth was taken to the hospital and died on 6 June. The attack is being investigated as terrorism by Belgian authorities. Several more threats followed on Belgian as well as on French Jewish sites, often coming from people having links with radical Islamists. By those terrorists many youngster felt called to do horrible things, not even afraid to carry loads of bombs from one place to another. Home made bombs but also professional weapons switched hands easily, to bring fear and terror in name of Allah.

Emblem of  United Nations Arabic: الأمم المتحدةSimplified Chinese: 联合国French: Organisation des Nations uniesRussian: Организация Объединённых НацийSpanish: Naciones Unidas  It also did not help that the problems of the settlers in Israel and the relationship between Israeli and Palestinian governement did not progress in the good direction. The anti-Israel resolution of the UN being considered by Israel as a “no” to the possibility of peace. Israel having the impression the UN gave a sign to continue on the path of terrorism and incitement.

Since the attacks of November 2015 the West of the European continent came to realise that it is the whole of our society has come under attack. It is not just any more about Jews, Israel, Christendom, Belgium or France but the citizens their culture, freedom, way of life and world view.

All French people are now aware that they are at threat and we are slowly but surely regaining our position on the national stage. We have always been vigilant and concerned and now we continue to be so. We remain alert and know that we are still the preferred target of Islamist totalitarianism. Today, we are no longer indifferent targets.

said Francis Kalifat.

Some now may have come to think it is more a battle against Islam. they should know fighting against Islam is as wrong as fighting against Judaism or Christianity. the world has to see it are just a few extremists who make life difficult for a whole group of people. Because the Brussels attacks of March 22, 2016 and later the Marseille and Nice attacks the governments focused Islamic terrorists and people where more afraid of such further terrorist acts. This made that 2016 saw a net drop in anti-Semitic acts and threats: a 58% reduction compared with 2015, though anti-Islamic acts also dropped by the same amount.

Kalifat warned that nevertheless, anti-Semitism remains at a historic high. Jewish people, who represent under 1% of the population, remained a focal point of over 30% of all reported racist acts committed in France throughout 2016, being subject to 335 anti-Semitic acts and threats.

The tell-tale signs of anti-Semitism never seem to be far away.

Probably less Jews where victims of harassment because the Jewish quarters had everywhere soldiers patrolling. The increased police patrols also made lost of place less vulnerable, which can also be seen in the lesser amount of robberies.

Leaders of French Jewry may have expressed both relief over the defeat of the far-right candidate Marine Le Pen in the presidential elections and concern over her receiving more than a third of the vote, they may not forget that those 11 million voters for the extreme right party can perhaps be only part of the many right wingers who would love all Jews and Muslims out of their ‘Catholic’ country.

Joel Mergui, the president of the Consistoire, was very fast to react on Sunday evening in a statement by his group, which is responsible for providing religious services to Jews to say he was happy with the result of Emmanuel Macron being elected president,

“which constitutes a veritable relief for all our nation and for the Jewish community of France”.

Chief Rabbi Haim Korsia, who is employed by the Consistoire, also spoke of his satisfaction from the vote. But in his statement, Korsia also referenced concerns over the support shown to Le Pen and those who would like to ban wearing Jewish and Muslim religious symbols in public, ritual slaughter and the provision of pork-free meals in school cafeterias, like they also have done in Belgium.

The ban for the religious symbols in the Belgian state schools is idiotic, because state-schools should just show they are free of any religious bias and that they are open to all sorts of religion. That ban is already some years in use by several Belgian schools and recently some complaints where made that elderly homes and prisons still provided pork-free meals. at first there was only a ban on ritual slaughter in private homes by ordinary citizens, but from 2017 onward there shall be a total ban of ritual slaughter in Belgium, which shall make it very difficult for religious Jews, Muslims and certain Christians to have kosher or halal meat from the own country. As long as importation would not be a problem, work of it can made that way, but it will also undermine the countries own economy.

Kalifat, who has lobbied intensively in favour of Macron in recent days, wrote optimistically on Twitter that everything starts now.

And that is what we can hope for … that a new start is made to bring non-Jews to come to understand why certain regulations are so important for the Jewish community, who want to put God’s mitzvot above the laws of man.

Also it is getting time that non-Jews come to see that there is a difference between secular (or apikorsim) – political Jews and religious Jews, who want to live according to the Law of God.

We only can hope that the new French president shall make work to bring Europeans of all sorts of religions together to live in peace and that he with the European Unions also shall try to get both parties Israel to come to negotiate directly in order to reach a point where they can live side by side in peace and security. All parties involved should recognise that as well as for Jews, Christians and Muslims, all having their faith build on the same root, our patriarch Abraham, that for all of them Jerusalem is a holy place. Real lovers of God, be them Jews, Christians or Muslims do know that Jerusalem in the end shall become the capital of the world. Therefore the lovers of God should also stimulate their politicians to get the political groups around the table to find a good solution for reconciliation and lasting peace.

I would love to see that all shall be able to come to believe that big picture Mr Kalifar wished to reiterate

that Israel is a democracy, a State respecting the rule of law and a country of freedoms. It is a democracy which has held 5 general elections since 2003 and now counts 13 Arab members among a total of 120 in the Knesset. This State, which respects the rule of law, is also home to a Supreme Court and judges whose independence is renowned and rulings are just.  It is a country where all are free to practice or change religion, or indeed not to follow one at all. It is a country where Jews, Christians and Muslims are afforded access to their holy sites within the ancient city of Jerusalem.  June 2017 will see the 50th anniversary of that freedom. Previously, and for centuries, Jews could do no more than dream of and pray for as much.

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Preceding

Kindertransport

Apocalyptic Extremism: No Longer a Laughing Matter

Seeds from the world creating division and separation from God

What to do in the Face of Global Anti-semitism

The Rise of Anti-Seminism

If you’re going to be a hater, make sure you’ve done your homework.

Dr. Miller looking at Jews in France

Bringers of agony, Trained in Belgium and Syria

Bruxelles Ma Belle

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Please read also:

  1. January 2015 Île-de-France attacks
  2. November 2015 Paris attacks
  3. At the closing hours of 2016 #1 Looking down at terror
  4. Jewish Museum of Belgium shooting
  5. Knife-trust in democratic sore back
  6. Brussels bombings
  7. Mediterranean bloodshed
  8. 2016 Nice attack
  9. 14 Year Old With Sack Full of Bombs Seized in Belgium
  10. Danny Dannon Complete Smackdown of the Anti-Israel UN Resolution
  11. Another 5,000 Jews quit France for Israel
  12. ‘French Jews experiencing worst situation since 1945’
  13. January 27 – 70 years ago Not an end yet to genocide
  14. Hamas the modern Philistines
  15. 25 Orthodox rabbis issued a statement on Christianity
  16. The American clouds of Anti-Semitism
  17. Donald Trump after declining numbers of people victimised for their religion managed to increase the numbers again
  18. Incidents of hate have become commonplace in the U.S.A. anno 2017
  19. Beware of Jews
  20. French Jews worried over Le Pen’s success in presidential vote’s 1st round
  21. Natan Sharansky (Jew) : There is no future for Jews in France
  22. French Jews ‘relieved’ Macron won but worried over Le Pen’s electoral gains

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Other articles of interest

  1. The Day France Refused To Surrender
  2. France Says “Non”
  3. Far-right nationalism is dealt a second blow, as Le Pen is defeated in France
  4. What does the French Presidential Election Tell Us?
  5. Make Ready the Elysian Fields: Globalization Wins French Election Thanks To Worst Turnout in 50 Years
  6. Macron Wins In France
  7. Macron wins French election, but Marine Le Pen wins a contest for legitimacy
  8. the sixth republic
  9. Open borders, migrant mayhem, c’est la vie!
  10. The French Elections – What Now?
  11. The French Election in Under 2 Minutes
  12. Emmanuel Macron Wins French Presidency
  13. France’s Le Pen to reform National Front, create ‘new political force’
  14. Macron Beats Le Pen In French Election | EU Leaders Rejoice | Is France
  15. Nigel Farage Discusses Le Pen’s Defeat in French Election
  16. Nigel Farage: Le Pen will be French president in 2022. 8th May 2017
  17. UMD Students Weigh in on French Election
  18. Notes From Underground: Au Revoir, Marine Le Pen
  19. The Quint: Macron Expresses Gratitude After Becoming France’s New President
  20. Listen: Dr Myriam Benraad speaks about the election of Emmanuel Macron
  21. Macron’s French win: Viva la dance!
  22. Le Pen loses to Macron in the French Presidential election
  23. Attacks on Holocaust survivors and pogroms in post-war Poland – a lecture by Dr. Edyta Gawron of Jagiellonian University
  24. The New Leader Of France’s National Front Questioned The Existence Of Nazi Gas Chambers
  25. Marine Le Pen’s party president, holocaust denier
  26. The One Lesson of the Holocaust
  27. Israel Indicts US Hacker Linked To Threats To Jewish Centers
  28. Mugwump! – Election News In Brief
  29. Multiculturalism and the Jews
  30. There are more anti-Semitic posts on Twitter than Facebook, Instagram and YouTube combined
  31. Jews Are Still the Biggest Target of Religious Hate Crimes
  32. FTAC – Tip to the KGB’s Amplification of Middle Eastern Anti-Semitism
  33. It’s Hard Helping You When You Are Anti-Semitic, Among Other Things
  34. FTACT: Anti-Semitism and the Displacement of the Medieval Mode by a Developing Modern World
  35. Anti-Semitic Acts In Massachusetts More Than Doubled In 2016Keith Preston: US using anti-Semitism excuse to cover up growing opposition to Israel
  36. B’nai Brith records highest number of anti-Semitic incident in Canada in 2016
  37. Israel’s New Cultural War of Aggression
  38. Report: The link between the election of Donald Trump and resurgent anti-Semitism is now undeniable
  39. Democratic Party Stands By Complicit As Violent, Anti-Semitic NYC City Council Candidate Rises
  40. American Media Discriminate Against Jewish, For Muslim Single-Sex Pool Mark Regev at SOAS: a victory for free speech
  41. Fighting Back Is the Best Way to Combat Antisemitism on College Campuses
  42. UNESCO to fire another volley at Israel – on Independence Day
  43. Memorializing terror victims, Netanyahu urges Abbas to stop funding

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Filed under Crimes & Atrocities, History, Political affairs, Religious affairs, World affairs

Migration not something to fear

With the terrorist attacks in Paris last weekend, the European Union was shocked again and the social media went as a roller-coaster shouting love and hate messages.

In most messages which tried to bring fear and hate against non-Caucasians and people of an other faith than Christendom we noticed that that’s a gross of given numbers was overestimated a lot. Many overestimate the amount of illegal citizens as well as the amount of refugees.

What does “fair” migration look like? Does protecting citizens’ rights depend upon limiting migrants’ freedoms? Or is migration actually one of the best weapons we have in the fight against poverty, injustice and social immobility – on both sides of our border?

Lets look at real ciphers:

Ten years ago, developing countries hosted 70% of the world’s refugees. In 2014 it could reach 86% of the amount of which those who reached Europe were just a very tiny percentage 4 à 5 %  of the total population of Europe.

The 49 least-developed countries – places like Chad, Malawi, and Yemen – provide asylum to 2.4 million exiles. By whatever measure you choose, the idea that the West is under siege from would-be refugees flies in the face of statistical evidence. In Pakistan, there are 552 refugees for every dollar per capita GDP; that number is 303 in Ethiopia, and 301 in Kenya. For the US, UK and Australia, the equivalent numbers are 5.4, 4.7 and 0.9.

In certain developed states we can see that people move around quite a lot to find work opportunities. This might not be so much in Belgium and Holland, but for France and other countries the locals often have to emigrate to an other place to be able to survive. Spanish, Greek and Portuguese we may find looking for work in Germany.

Most of us, if we move at all, do so within the borders of our own country – from Manchester to London, or from New York to California. In fact, we are at least six times more likely to migrate across a country (from one region to another) than we are to move across a border. There are at least 740 million domestic migrants. Few today would suggest we should restrict these migrations – in fact, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights explicitly prohibits such restrictions. But however obvious this may seem to us, your right to move within the borders of your own is relatively recent. The US Supreme Court, for instance, only definitely confirmed US citizens’ ‘fundamental’ right to ‘move at will from place to place’ across state lines in 1920.

English: Stamp of Moldova: 50th anniversary of...

Stamp of Moldova: 50th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In 2013, according to the World Bank, there were 232 million people living outside the country of their birth. This is a significant number: but it isn’t overwhelming. It means that just 3% of the world’s 7 billion inhabitants are international migrants. The real puzzle about the age of global mobility is arguably not why so many people are moving across borders, but why so many are not.

Lots of people are afraid to loose their jobs when refugees come to live and work in their country. they must see that when more people are coming to live here, there shall be a need of more housing facilities, more products to be made for the growing amount of consumers, and those coming to work here shall also contribute to the social security providing enough money to pay for the older generation which shall be able to do more in their retirement.

Until 2008, Swedish labour migration was among the most restrictive system in the developed world: trade unions ‘had, and used, an informal veto on recruitment’. Today, its labour migration system is one of the most liberal. Employers – having first advertised the job to the local EU market for 10 days – can effectively recruit any worker, for any job, from anywhere. The result? Swedish workers working for firms recruiting labour migrants earn on average 10.5% more than those working in firms that don’t. The recent rise of the far-right Swedish Democrats risks pulling apart this liberal – and successful – model for labour migration

When it comes to inequality, birthplace is destiny. In 2012, researchers at the World Bank determined that no less than 50% of our lifetime income is determined solely by the country we live in — which, for 97% of us, is also the country we were born in.  It’s a citizenship lottery – and those of us lucky enough to be born in wealthy states are automatic winners.

This means international migration is one of the only ways in which individuals can redress the arbitrary inequalities of citizenship assigned at birth. And it works – a migrant who moves from a low-income to a high-income country can expect, on average, a 15-fold increase in income — and a 16-fold decrease in child mortality rates.

Emigration is not a one-way flow: Western citizens leave their home countries too.

In 2014, at least 5.6 million British citizens lived permanently abroad. And while some of them may prefer to call themselves “expatriates”, 40% of these emigrants – an estimated 2.2 million UK citizens – are EU migrants by any other name.  That balances neatly with the 2.3 million EU migrants from other states who have come to the UK.

Did those ex-pats bring problems to the countries they moved to? Did those migrating people bring more criminality in those visited countries?

The US has experienced a 45% drop in violent crime rates since 1990. During the same period, the number of unauthorised migrants climbed from 3.5 to 11 million, and the percentage of the population who were foreign born rose from 8 to 13%. Correlation, of course, is not causation.  But it is a good indication that more migration does not translate into more crime.  And in fact, researchers from the US have similarly concluded that ‘broad reductions in violent crime during recent years are partially attributable to increases in immigration’. In the UK, immigrant “enclaves” – defined as neighbourhoods where at least 30% of the residents are immigrants – have lower levels of crime and victimisation than similar socio-economic areas without a large immigrant presence.

We must be honest and we must be sincerely looking at the reality of the migration issue.

Perhaps it would be better if more people would consider how a migration could keep a certain balance and how the refugees of today perhaps can be the solution for the problems we shall have to face when the boomchildren are going to retire.

Remember also what @Shaimaakhalil by mobilitymuse twittered today

Refugees are not the cause of violence,they are the people trying to flee it. Hope EU leaders remember that as they deal with
  • With thanks for the text-material to “Migrants and Citizens” which poses the big questions we need to be asking about immigration and inequality.

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Preceding:

What we don’t say about the refugee crisis?

Human tragedy need to be addressed at source

Real progress leaves nobody behind

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Additional reading:

  1. Built on or Belonging to Jewish tradition #3 Of the earth or of God
  2. Welfare state and Poverty in Flanders #3 Right to Human dignity
  3. Welfare state and Poverty in Flanders #8 Work
  4. Economic crisis danger for the rise of political extremism
  5. Refugee crisis, terrorist attacks and created fear
  6. Europe’s refugees just follow the ancient routes for the peopling of Europe in the Neolithic
  7. Is ISIS a product of American in-action or a product of direct action
  8. Islamophobic hate crimes rise in UK following terror attacks
  9. Paris attacks darkning the world
  10. Trump brand of migrant demonization #1
  11. Trump brand of migrant demonization #2
  12. Europe and much-vaunted bastions of multiculturalism becoming No God Zones
  13. Wrong ideas about religious terrorism
  14. State and attitude of certain people to blame for radicalisation
  15. The world Having to face a collective failure
  16. Can We Pay The Price To Free Humanity?
  17. Bringing into safety from Iraq and Iran

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Further reading

  1. Welcoming the Refugee – Choosing to Walk Away from Fear
  2. Feelings on Refugees, Post-Paris Attacks
  3. The other side
  4. So many women stand waiting behind fences…
  5. The Migration of the Irish to Newport in the 1800’s.
  6. America, the Not So Promised Land – The New York Times
  7. Walter Noteboom’s Emigration Record from the Netherlands
  8. San Marino and Paris
  9. Beach Bound
  10. Poll: Third of Jewish Israelis favor urging Arab Israeli emigration
  11. The Feld family – part two
  12. Dithane and Doodlebugs
  13. Jews Leave Europe as Arab-Muslims arrive
  14. Armenia’s independence generation
  15. Leaving on a jet plane, don’t know when I’ll be back again!
  16. Moving Home, Moving On
  17. Looking for emigrants from the Rhineland?
  18. I Need to share…
  19. Hello from the other side…

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Filed under Activism and Peace Work, Crimes & Atrocities, Economical affairs, Headlines - News

What we don’t say about the refugee crisis?

The migrant crisis “risks bursting the E.U. at its weak seams,” said Stefano Stefanini, a former senior Italian ambassador now based in Brussels.

“It’s more dangerous than the Greek drama and more serious than the Euro, because it challenges fundamental European accomplishments and beliefs.”

When Europe is not able to proof to its citizens that it can control who is entering the European Union and we shall have more attacks on our society like last weekend in Paris than we shall have a bigger problem.

In the future we shall have to face emigration for other reasons than just the political ones, because our environment is changing so much that certain areas on this globe shall be unable to provide enough life chances for any living being (man, animal and plant).

We must calculate that also environmental factors often force people to migrate, to move from one country or region and settle in another, due to climate change, land degradation, and the lack of jobs in urban cities. The economical emigration shall not lessen in our society but become a reality also for people living in the Euro zone, having to look for work in other countries than the country of origin or birthplace.

The United States of America as well as Russia also shall have to take into account such change in local circumstances and having people moving around in their own state, just to find the right work or to have a decent income to be able to survive.

At the same time to avoid internal problems, because of the differences between locals and migrating people, in the education system it has to be build in that people shall have an open attitude for other cultures, traditions and faiths. To get social integration the minds of all have to be prepared to be open minded and to respect freedom of speech, thought and religion.

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Eritrean Semhar Haile reflecting on what’s missing from media coverage of the refugee crisis, and on how simplistic representations perpetuate old stereotypes about the global south.

Screen-Shot-2015-09-03-at-14.24.12-884x559refugee crisis’ =  one of the most talked about topic at the moment.

Western mass media’s attention to the ‘crisis’.

Fundamental reason for the displacement of refugees.

underlying reason for increasing displacement of many Eritreans

Often refugee crisis blamed on ‘ineffective states’ + states with an ‘authoritarian’ nature + lack of democracy > makes perfect sense to remove these ineffective or ‘failed’ states => in reduce flow of refugees from global south to north.

accusing ‘ineffective’ states as sole reason for displacement= simplifies various complex reasons leading to displacement.

ignoring legacy of colonialism, neo colonialism, global neoliberalism, + increasing inequalities

many structural causes of displacement often overlooked + environmental factors

Reutersglobal + domestic inequality increasingly widening

economy weakens day by day => not having the luck to survive through remittances = left behind.

important to have a wider understanding of the global political economy, and its role in the increasing mass displacement.

reason for displacement >refugee status > well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion => if displaced due to wider structural causes = almost impossible to grant refugee status ==> reproduce ‘the right story’ = to gain refugee status

Ali Farzat
Ali Farzat

 

Preceding articles:

Human tragedy need to be addressed at source

Poster: Please help the refugees

Real progress leaves nobody behind

Swallowed in the Sea but belonging to earth

The natural beauties of life

How to make sustainable, green habits second nature

Vatican meeting of mayors talking about global warming, human trafficking and modern-day slavery

Republican member of Congress from Arizona to boycott pope’s address over climate change

++

Additional reading:

  1. A smile of Steel and Moving forward in the European Union
  2. Science, 2013 word of the year, and Scepticism
  3. USA Climate Change Action Plan
  4. Greenpeace demands scale up of ecological farming
  5. Vatican against Opponents of immigration
  6. Three pillars of sustainable development, young people and their rights

+++

Further reading:

  1. Migrant Boat Overturns Near Greek Island, at Least Nine Dead
  2. Why Climate Change Skeptics & Evolution Deniers Joined Forces
  3. Teacher Outcry at Students Detention
  4. bleeding heart
  5. America’s Response to the Paris Attacks is Deplorable.
  6. Paris, in Retrospect
  7. Her name….Mother of Exiles
  8. Reflections of an Agnostic Regarding the Current Crisis
  9. Welcoming the Refugee – Choosing to Walk Away from Fear
  10. Should Canada stop bringing in Syrian refugees because of the Paris attacks? Experts say no.
  11. What Malcolm Tucker and the Refugee Crisis have taught us all.
  12. Polish Patriots Marched Against The Muslim Invasion
  13. Get Real
  14. Key Republicans Call for Suspending Syrian Refugee Resettlements
  15. Why Can’t We Take Out These Bastards CNN Reporter Asks Obama
  16. If You Are Going To Watch This – Be Prepared To Be Blown Away #ParisAttacks #PrayForSyria ISIL
  17. Gay Man Fears Mass Muslim Immigration
  18. Syrian refugees: Quebec immigration minister says security won’t be compromised
  19. Myth of Islamophobia after #ParisAttacks
  20. Shorter Obama; Feckless Again
  21. Feelings on Refugees, Post-Paris Attacks
  22. Helga Zepp-LaRouche: We Need A Public Debate On The Real Interests Of All Nations
  23. After Paris attacks, Syrian refugees shunned in U.S. over terror fears
  24. Should We Even Get Involved? (refugee crisis thoughts, pt.1)
  25. Prepare for war
  26. Brussels Connection Under Spotlight After Paris Killings
  27. In Justin Trudeau’s ‘Canadastan,’ you get arrested for speaking out against Muslim terrorist attacks in Paris
  28. Polish football fans send clear message to muslims and islam
  29. And now what?
  30. Wholeness that knows no end
  31. A Hotel runned by refugees
  32. Children of Men
  33. World leaders warn – it has begun: Welcome to World War III
  34. Governor Rick Snyder: No more Syrian refugees in Michigan
  35. The other side
  36. The Meaning of Paris
  37. A clarification
  38. #ParisAttack Gives France The Opportunity Send Troops Into Syria After Fake Passport Found
  39. Paris attacks: Passport linked to terrorist complicates Syrian refugee crisis
  40. ISIS IS a problem but it ain’t the only one
  41. Now Confirmed French Government Knew Extremists Before Attack
  42. Solidarité: The Paris Attack and the Refugee Crisis
  43. Be Not Afraid
  44. Syrian Refugee Crisis
  45. It’s the Muslims Who Suffer
  46. Major Intelligence Failures By French Security Before #ParisAttack

+++

Becoming adult

Semhar Haile reflects on what’s missing from media coverage of the refugee crisis, and on how simplistic representations perpetuate old stereotypes about the global south.

Screen-Shot-2015-09-03-at-14.24.12-884x559

The ‘refugee crisis’ is one of the most talked about topic at the moment. In fact, many people only learnt about the existence of certain countries such as Eritrea due to Western mass media’s attention to the ‘crisis’. The Wall Street Journal dedicated a whole article on Eritrean refugees currently residing in Ethiopian refugee camps. The article, titled African Dictatorship Fuels Migrant Crisis, tries to understand the underlying reason for the increasing displacement of many Eritreans, and it attempts to look at the crisis from various perspectives, by interviewing refugees and some Eritrean government members. The article concludes by identifying the ‘Authoritarian State’ as the fundamental reason for the displacement of refugees.

Balanza (1)The above conclusion is not new. Often the refugee crisis is blamed on ‘ineffective…

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