Tag Archives: Earth

A cry in the dark by scientists and medics

It is a well-known fact that nature influences people. From all sites of the world, scientists cried out loud to become aware of what we are doing with Planet Earth. Mother Earth also cries, but so many do not want to hear nor see.
More than 200 medical journals from around the world have written an open letter demanding that governments stop climate change.

They believe that a warming planet is the biggest threat to world health. Sound advice or over-reacting? Leave your comments.

More than 230 medical journals have put climate change at the top of the world’s health agenda as the November COP26 climate conference in Glasgow approaches. They have published the biggest joint editorial in history to warn everyone that the greatest threat to public health is failure to keep the global temperature rise below 1.5°C. The signatories include The BMJ, the NEJM, The Lancet and numerous other top journals (with the notable exception of JAMA).

The terms of the editorial are apocalyptic:

“The science is unequivocal; a global increase of 1.5°C above the pre-industrial average and the continued loss of biodiversity risk catastrophic harm to health that will be impossible to reverse.”

“Indeed,” they write, “no temperature rise is ‘safe’.”

The role of governments is fundamental, they say. “Governments must make fundamental changes to how our societies and economies are organised and how we live.” Everything has to change: “transport systems, cities, production and distribution of food, markets for financial investments, health systems, and much more”.

And it is going to be very expensive. “Many governments met the threat of the covid-19 pandemic with unprecedented funding. The environmental crisis demands a similar emergency response. Huge investment will be needed, beyond what is being considered or delivered anywhere in the world.”

Missing from the editorial are the nuts and bolts of how global temperatures will impact on health – or simply some guesstimates of how many people will die if the temperature rises 1.5°C.

Climate gadfly Bjorn Lomborg is sceptical of the claims in the letter. He points out that the number of climate-change related deaths has plummeted since 1920:

Over the past hundred years, annual climate-related deaths have declined by more than 96%. In the 1920s, the death count from climate-related disasters was 485,000 on average every year. In the last full decade, 2010-2019, the average was 18,362 dead per year, or 96.2% lower.

He concludes that “we are now much less vulnerable to climate impacts than at any time in the last 100 years. It is possible that climate change has made impacts worse over the last century … but resiliency from higher living standards has entirely swamped any potential climate impact.”

Chances are, this letter will have no impact whatsoever on climate change policy. But it might make people sicker. Experts recently warned of “an impending epidemic of mental health related disorders such as eco-anxiety, climate disaster-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and future-orientated despair.” Nothing makes people suffering from eco-anxiety more anxious than eco-doctors predicting an apocalypse.

Michael Cook  editor of BioEdge

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Health Ranger apocalypse warnings already given in 2012

In 2012 several reports of scientists warned already for a coming epidemic and several natural disasters, as flooding, earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

The Oxford University’s Future of Humanity Institute and the Global Challenges Foundation warned already several years ago that the human race was gravely threatened by out-of-control science. Science has already begun to reveal alarming unintended consequences across our planet. The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power facility, for example, still contains massive quantities of stored nuclear fuel rods — 85 times the radiation of the worst disaster in the history of nuclear power generation, 1986 Chernobyl catastrophe — and those rods are alarmingly vulnerable to an earthquake or repeat tsunami which could unleash another massive plume of radiation.

Bible students are not surprised at all, because the Book of books warns mankind of times to come and gives all the signals which mankind should come to recognise. Even when there may be several scientists who would deny global warming and the given signs from the Bible, believers in God do know God’s Plan shall be fulfilled.

Nuclear scientists had assured such disasters like Chrnobil or  Fukushima could never happen, but look nowand be aware of the amount of kilometres “no go” zone it created for decades.. Just like the scientists said “GMOs are perfectly safe” or that Roundup herbicide or medical antibiotics will never cause any unintended negative side effects. (Widespread Roundup use has now resulted in the rise of superweeds, just as medical antibiotics use has resulted in the rise of deadly drug-resistant superbugs.) (http://naturalnews.com/033195_superweeds_far…)

We should be aware that humanity has already some years ago, reached a tipping point of developing technology so profound that it can destroy the human race; yet this rise of “science” has in no way been matched by a rise in consciousness or ethics. In the light of what happens today, citizens should be aware that there are scientific people who operate with total disregard for the future of life on Earth. Several scientists scoff at the idea of balancing scientific “progress” with caution, ethics or reasonable safeguards. Unbridled experiments like GMOs have unleashed self-replicating genetic pollution that now threatens the integrity of food crops around the world, potentially threatening the global food supply.

and remarked:

brilliant scientists have obtained remarkable technical mastery but operate as hopeless infants in the realm of philosophy, ethics and wisdom.

Here’s the list of apocalyptic threats documented by Oxford scientists. Items in bold are ones he documented and published many years ago:

1. Global pandemic
2. Supervolcano
3. Artificial Intelligence
4. Extreme climate change
5. Synthetic biology
6. Asteroid impact
7. Ecological collapse
8. Nanotechnology
9. Nuclear war
10. Government collapse
11. Global economic collapse

His own list of apocalyptic threats posed by runaway science, as shown in the infographic below, was published as follows:

1. Nuclear power
2. Genetic pollution (ecological collapse)
3. Nanotechnology
4. Bioweapons (unleashing a global pandemic)
5. Atmospheric experiments (causing extreme weather)
6. Artificial intelligence
7. Particle accelerator physics experiments gone awry
8. Pollinator disruption chemicals (food supply collapse)
9. Weaponized vaccines (has already come true with covert infertility chemicals)
10. Antibiotics (rise of deadly superbugs)
11. Water pollution with deadly chemicals
12. Nuclear weapons

As you can see, the Oxford scientists left out of their list the risk of runaway superbugs caused by antibiotics, the risk of a food supply collapse caused by the loss of pollinators. Their inclusion of “ecological collapse” was focused more on pollution in general rather than genetic pollution caused by the unintended consequences of genetic engineering.

Read more:

S.O.S. – Stop Out-of-Control Science

Oxford University scientists confirm Health Ranger apocalypse warnings three years later

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Top 9 sustainability practices of nature that you should practice

Top 9 sustainability practices of nature that you should practice – by Godwin Terhemba Ihagh

We may refer to nature as the unseen power that makes all forms of life and natural activities function on Earth. Nature has been handling enormous environmental changes on Earth for about 3.5 billion years; that’s why many environmental experts say that when the Earth faces problematic environmental changes, we should observe and learn how to use nature’s methods/practices to handle such changes.

In order to sustain our mental and emotional health, and have good control over our environment, children, restaurants, homes, hotels, businesses, construction industries, and many other areas of life, we can learn and apply the incredible ways nature has employed in sustaining the variety of life on the Earth, especially in the midst of catastrophic environmental changes.

“top 9 sustainability practices of nature”:

1. Nature’s practice of relying on solar energy:

2. Nature’s practice of being diverse:

3. Nature’s practice of recycling without wasting:

4. Nature’s practice of silence:

5. Nature’s practice of never being in a hurry

6. Nature’s practice of being positive — or not worrying:

7. Nature’s practice of being flexible and fully fit: Being flexible will increase your ability to adapt and survive in any situation.

8. Nature’s practice of being selfless and caring

9. Nature’s practice of not being extravagant

Read more about it: Top 9 sustainability practices of nature that you should practice

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Come To The Quiet!

The rustling leaves want to whisper a lot to humanity. They hope that their fall song will reach some kind-hearted.

Though not many want to know or see that the surroundings where they are living in are a gift of the Divine Maker, Who has a plan for mankind but also wants us to take care of the earth and all living beings on it.

Joy Cometh In The Morning

Nancy Watching The Setting Sun 2018

COME TO THE QUIET 

 Do you hear it?Can you perceive it?The voice of God is callingRevealing bit by bitThe plan of your life laid outDoes He have to use a shout?To get the message to youExplaining all that it is about?Perhaps in all your busy waysThe quiet does not comeGod is calling you to STOPAnd know where peace is fromYou must let your words be fewTaking time to really hearKnowing God is speaking to youAnd that His Presence is so nearCome, Come to the quietSettle yourself to receiveGod is waiting to impartDirection and faith to believe!A word from the Lord in a poem as given to Nancy Young 9/21/2018 Ecclesiastes 5 "Keep thy foot when thou goest to the house of God, and be more ready to hear…for God is in heaven, and thou upon…

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Warning! Hot Weather?

JamieAdStories

Feeling the brilliant heat,

Enjoying the balmy weather,

Stop for a minute and think,

For we are getting ourselves into a tether.

This heatwave is caused by us,

So yes I’ll be making a fuss,

To me the hot weather is sad,

A reflection of all we do that is bad.

Pollution, consumption and travel,

Are putting us under the gavel,

We need to think of a way through,

Where the climate is stable but the skies are still blue.

So I agree that the hotness is fine,

But the damage it does is causing Earth to decline,

We need to get governments to start fixing this mess,

So we prevent the world becoming a desert of loneliness.

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High Recognitions . . . We must enrich the Earth with love and kindness.

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The natural beauties of life

When we look around us we should be able to see all the beauty of nature. But many of us live in cities where we are surrounded by buildings and not much green.

The beautiful nature is given to us freely, but not many people do respect that free gift as such. We, as human beings are also not so keen to use it properly and to take into account that many after us still have to be able to enjoy as much as we did or even more. Often terrible things have to happen before we as human being want to think about what is going on or what our responsibility should be for making sure lots of people can enjoy those treasures of earth.

In many Asian countries several people are already seriously feeling the effects of the industrial revolution and the technical progress of the last two centuries. People may be happy the world advanced so much and that we do have a lot of gadgets which make life so much easier. But in many poor countries, those people do not enjoy such modern domestication? Several families by powerful storms found their riverside home destroyed already more than once. Millions have already lost more than the modest roof over their head. Millions spend their days collecting cow dung for fuel and struggling to grow vegetables in soil poisoned by saltwater. They live on borrowed time in a vast landscape of river islands, bamboo huts, heartbreaking choices and impossible hopes.

Government representatives and scientists on Tuesday March the 25th opened a five-day meeting of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to finalize a report assessing the impacts of climate change on human and natural systems, options for adaptation, and the interactions among climate changes, other stresses on societies, and opportunities for the future.

The meeting, the culmination of four years’ work by hundreds of experts who have volunteered their time and expertise to produce a comprehensive assessment, was to approve the Summary for Policymakers of the second part of the IPCC’s Fifth Assessment Report, checking the text line by line.

The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) wants to achieve a stabilization of green-house gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. Such a level should be achieved within a time frame sufficient to allow ecosystems to adapt naturally to climate change, to ensure that food production is not threatened and to enable economic development to proceed in a sustainable manner.
All of us should be aware that limiting the effects of climate change is necessary to achieve sustainable development and equity, including poverty eradication. At the same time, some mitigation efforts could undermine action on the right to promote sustainable development, and on the achievement of poverty eradication and equity. Consequently, a comprehensive assessment of climate policies involves going beyond a focus on mitigation and adaptation policies alone to examine development pathways more broadly, along with their determinants.

We all should also know that we have to take a collective action because we are speaking of problem at the global scale, because most greenhouse gases (GHGs) accumulate over time and mix globally, and emissions by any agent (e.g., individual, community, company, country) affect other agents. International cooperation is therefore required to effectively mitigate GHG emissions and address other climate change issues.

Social, economic and ethical analyses may be used to inform value judgements and may take into account values of various sorts, including human well-being, cultural values and non-human values. But all people should be informed how much they themselves also can contribute to the global effect, even when their personal impact may be very small it is important that everybody does his or her own bit for the protection of the earth.
Awareness and appreciation for the environment is very important, so we should help to get others to be more conscious of the importance to safeguard the earth’s future and the future of our children their children.
We would like to present a website where the beauties of nature are nicely presented, but where one is not afraid to see behind all that beauty the danger of vanishing worlds. We have evolved far away from the snapshots that have served as surrogates, except perhaps for one surrogate which continues to grow, namely the extended reach of the body’s comprehension of the world.
Doing so more insistently than did other forms of mimetic representation, photography seemed to stand in for the direct, bodily experience of the individual, its lens becoming the roving eye of the beholder. Most obviously one sees this in travel and expeditionary photographs of the nineteenth century, for which skilled professionals travelled forth from Western Europe and the eastern USA to record and bring back views of sites as various as India, the American West and the Middle East. {Oxford Companion to the Body }
Photography, you could say, is the visual medium of this modern world, where events can be captured for the future, but were stories of the past can be a witness of the things human beings did or because they did not want to see, refusing to hear the signs have been lost for the next generations.
As a means of recording, and as an art form in its own, photography pervades our lives and shapes our perceptions…

A private photobook collector and trader, living in the Netherlands, who has sold many photobooks online (Ebay.nl, Marktplaats.nl & Boekwinkeltjes.nl/Bint) and therefore has also set up a devoted website (see http://bintphotobooks.googlepages.com/)& his Blog (see http://bintphotobooks.blogspot.com/) brings us a variety of artists worth viewing.

We do know that:

“Perception is relative and selective”…If the presenter does not clarify a message, then the receiver imposes his own meaning drawing from his/her experience, needs and expectations.

On his website we can find many beautiful photographs which clearly tell a story which has to be heard by many. Therefore we also like to introduce you to it. Our world is much to important to have it been destroyed by the greed of our consumerism.

The one looking through the lens may capture a whole story in one click and make it easy for others to see that what is behind the picture. Every photographer may put his own statement in the way he looks at things. Behind the pictures may be told also a whole story and the writer of Bint photobooks may carry us away along the threads of reality that often stay hidden for those who live in the cities of the Western world.

In Kadir van Lohuizen: Putting stories into perspective for example we can learn that the celebrated Dutch photographer Kadir van Lohuizen feels that there are many big stories around the world that need to be told and that it is his responsibility to tell them in the right way. He brings us with his camera from the North to the South, from Greenland to Kiribati and Fiji, close to Australia, passing by Panama but also showing us the problems of cities in the United States, like Boston, all places where they feel the rising seas. On the net we also can find some other interesting photographs of professional photographers, like Mitch Zeissler, and non-professional photographers, who do have a very good eye, like Cindy Barton Knoke who is willing to share that what she encounters on her many travels. Having such people willing to share the beauties they managed to see others are allowed to enjoy them too, which is great. This way people who are not in good health or do not have the money or no means to make such trips to faraway places can receive their dreams by such bloggers.

Having lots of people living between the structures of living quarters and offices, often confronted with the fumes, dust and pollution, they may value such beautiful countrysides, animals and by Cindy Barton Knoke also beautiful art, which give richness to the world. Those living in countries with wide fields, like in the United States perhaps do not see any sign of pollution in their region, and do think perhaps everything is exaggerated, but when they can see and hear the witnesses of those who can move around, come in different places or do scientific work, they perhaps come to believe that it is really time we do something to protect what we still have. In Belgium we are confronted with pollution and climate change nearly every day, so perhaps the Belgians do feel the urge to look for solutions more than some other citizens.

Climate-Greenland-slide-BJBO-superJumbo.jpgClimate-Greenland-slide-YDQV-superJumbo.jpg
Icebergs in a channel between Greenland’s Eqip Sermia glacier and Ilulissat Icefjord, the most active glacier in the Northern Hemisphere and so many other pictures Bint presents with his article on Kadir van Lohuizen is only showing us the figurative and literal top of the ice sheet melting as a result of climate change.

In 2012 van Lohuizen started project looking into consequences of sea-level rise in the world. Therefore he went to different regions that have been or will be affected quite soon by the rise and researched where people will have to relocate.

The 50-year-old photographer said he started the project after visiting a delta area in Bangladesh around three years ago, where he was struck by the apparent impact of rising sea levels and noticed that Bangladesh expects to evacuate 30 million people by 2050 due to rising sea levels.

He is also aware that the issue is more urgent than most people assume

“it’s very much knocking on our doors.”

The world has waited already too long before taking the matter seriously. Like in most places, there has to happen something serious before people do something.

“Too often we start to think about the problem when it has happened, but not before.”

Bint writes

Aiming to raise awareness in the general audience, Kadir hoped that the message would also reach politicians and policymakers.

and gives the word to van Lohuizen who says:

“It’s going to be the biggest problem of the century. It’s not just islands disappearing but also sea water seeping into the mainland, causing soil to become saline, rendering people unable to grow crops and having more difficulty accessing clean water.”

We better make sure others get to know the beauties of nature, but also show how endangered the species and our own environment is. We clearly have to share the message of the importance to keep our world in good health.

The "burning embers" diagram above w...

The “burning embers” diagram above was produced by the IPCC in 2001. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Running challenge and the City build by the Most High Maker

Through the earth there runs a challenge
Clearer than the trumpet call:
“Oh, forsake your ancient folly,
Build the Brotherhood of all.
“Seek the city that God buildeth,
City of the heart and hand,
Not beyond the grave of shadow,
Here on earth, in your own land.”

Philip Britts

Philip Britts (1917 – 1949) joined the Cotswold Bruderhof in England
shortly before the Second World War. He had studied horticulture and loved
to work in field and garden. The depth of his thought and faith, his
dedication to the common life of peace and brotherhood, and his hope of the
Kingdom of Justice found expression in his poetry through his love for
nature and hard work.

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