Tag Archives: Disrespect

Reasons Why Racial Reconciliation Should Be a Church Priority

2020 has been a year when in several countries more division was created and more hatred was spread. Therefore it is not bad to remember once more why Christians have to avoid division and should do their best to unite people.
Let us look at what an American Baptist preacher has to tell about racism in church and in a community of followers of Christ.

“Pastor, why is racial reconciliation important for our church?”

This is a question I often faced as a pastor, posed by sincere church members who wanted to grow and learn. Here are three reasons why I believe racial reconciliation should be a church priority.

1. Racial reconciliation is important because every single person was created in the image of God.

The Bible is clear that there is no other way to look at your fellow human being other than someone sculpted by the hands of a loving God (Genesis 1-2; Psalm 139). It is this idea of the imago dei that informs our ethic. This means that there is no such thing as an “other”, only humans, image bearers of their Creator.

Prejudice is fueled by sin, sin that corrupts and divides. Sin causes us to favor people who look and sound and think like we do and causes us to disrespect and diminish the value of people who don’t. Christ came to heal that sin, to tear down walls, and to bridge the divide between races.

When we work toward racial reconciliation, we are saying, by our actions, that we agree with the gospel.

2. Racial Reconciliation is important because the Church is an outpost of the kingdom.

Revelation 5 and 7 describe a scene in Heaven where every nation, tribe, and tongue gather before the throne of God. This is not just some embellishing detail in John’s vision, this is an intentional display of the unifying power of the gospel to bring together in a new humanity what sin destroyed in the Fall. This tells us that racial unity is not just a nice thing for ideal communities, but something close to the heart of God. The vision of the Kingdom in Revelation tells us, this is what God desires.

Churches that work intentionally to model diversity show the world a glimpse of what is to come in full when Christ comes. Church becomes the place where disparate people from all walks of life are united by their love for Christ and their need for grace.

Racial reconciliation is important because it is the way we love our neighbours and contribute to their flourishing.

Christians are called to seek the welfare of the city, to love their neighbors, to be an agent of gospel renewal to the communities they serve. Many of our communities are beset by racial strife and filled with people who long for unity but feel powerless to achieve it. The church has the answer in the gospel of Jesus Christ. When we intentionally cultivate a thriving and diverse community, we offer a model for the rest of the community.

Racial reconciliation is one way we love our neighbors, by empathizing with the minorities in our communities who feel marginalized and by listening to the stories of our minority Christian brothers and sisters who might feel marginalized by the American Church.

Imagine if local churches could be safe places for people from different walks of life could work through their differences, incubators of racial reconciliation. Imagine if the Church became the one place where what is envisioned in Revelation 5 and 9 actually started happening and burst through the doors and into the community?

Racial reconciliation is not an idealistic notion; it’s a gospel imperative. It is difficult, slow, risky work whose full fruits will not be seen this side of Heaven. But those who bear the name of Christ are compelled by His love to pursue it, not only as a fresh gospel witness, but also to make glad the heart of the Father.

Daniel Darling is the Vice President for Communications for the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention (ERLC). He is a regular contributor to Leadership Journal and the author of several books, including his latest, Activist Faith. He regularly blogs at danieldarling.com. You can follow him on Twitter @DanDarling.

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Preceding

Looking at an American nightmare

Diversity and Equality

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Additional reading

  1. Kingdom of God what will it be like
  2. Unity doesn’t mean uniformity

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Filed under Activism and Peace Work, Religious affairs, Social affairs

Niet klagen over egoïsme

Maar al te graag schuift men de mensen geboren in de jaren 1940 en 1950 de schuld in hun schoenen van de huidige verwende koopzuchtige en aan hebbedingen verslaafde jongeren. Wij vragen ons wel dikwijls af wat wij verkeerd mogen gedaan hebben om zulk een zelfzuchtige gemeenschap gekweekt te hebben, terwijl velen van ons juist zo begaan waren met het beschermen van een gezamenlijk goed en het onderling delen van de dingen waarbij wij toch steeds het volle respect naar alles en iedereen vertoonden.

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Voorgaande

Dirk Van Duppen over de samenleving op een kruispunt

Naar het einde van 2020

Extremisme is terug van nooit weggeweest

2020 en het onfatsoen van het grote geld

Ludwig van El

“De huidige generatie is te egoïstisch, denkt alleen maar aan zichzelf.”
En wiens schuld is dat? Ze zijn opgegroeid in een wereld waarin het de gewoonte was, om maar geld van de ene groep af te pikken om aan een andere groep te geven. Dus deze generatie heeft alleen maar krijgen gekend, en niet geven.
En zo,teelt men egoïsten.
Dus: de vorige generatie die zich op de borst klopt om hoe sociaal ze waren, neem je eigen verantwoordelijkheid maar.
En besef je eindelijk eens, dat de staat voor je karretje spannen, nooit goed uitpakt.
Het is veel wenselijker om sociale voorzieningen door de samenleving (stam van het woord sociaal) te laten regelen, aant dat levert een samenhangende bevolking op, die wèl bereid is tot geven en nemen.

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Filed under Geschiedenis, Levensstijl, Nederlandse teksten - Dutch writings, Re-Blogs and Great Blogs, Sociale Aangelegenheden, Voelen en Welzijn, Wereld aangelegenheden

Arguments about believe and About Christianity versus Atheism

If Christians believe God loves everyone, they shouldn’t argue with atheists. If atheists don’t believe in God, what’s the point of insulting Christians?

is what can be found at a voting for

Top Ten Reasons Not to Argue About Christianity vs Atheism

A diagram showing the relationship between wea...

A diagram showing the relationship between weak/strong and implicit/explicit atheism. Strong atheism is always explicit, and implicit atheism is always weak. Explicit atheism can be either “weak” or “strong”. Based on a previous chart by User:FrostyBytes, in turn based on a previous chart by User:Silence. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Naturally you could think a Christian would not make such a list, but because humankind belongs to the weak beings such things happen. No matter what people might think, as long as we are in this time system, and as long the End of Days or Last Days shall not have taken place and the Kingdom of God having become a reality, man shall stay arguing about such matters.

Christians who would call other people who do not agree with them “demons” proof that they did not understand yet the teachings of Jesus Christ. Jesus himself respect other thinkers and wants us also to respect those of an other opinion.

People also should be fully aware that “Not all Atheists disrespect religion” and “Not all Christians disrespect Atheists thinking”

Many Christians may choose a flowchart, like presents on his blog “3 simple words to say to an atheist who criticizes Christianity

arguing with atheistic criticism of Christianity

Preceding articles:

Summerholiday season time to read the Bible

Holiday making and dreaming

Home-stayers and their to do list

Genre – Playing by the Rules

The Need to Understand Genre

Get into the habit of dealing with God about everything

Great things, Voice of God and terrors

Hatred and hostility against God

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Filed under Quotations or Citations, Religious affairs