Tag Archives: Boys

the infinity of you

An ode to all mothers and reason enough to make of every day a thanksgiving day.

The Lonely Author

n00264011-t

While sipping wine and listening to soft Latin jazz and samba, I thought of the great love women/mothers provide unselfishly with no boundaries. Sadly, it often goes unappreciated. I truly believe it is difficult for any man to truly reciprocate the endless love & warmth their lady truly deserves.

This poem evolved from those thoughts.

.

the infinity of you

.

The little boy in me
stands before the immense
universe of your poetry
Where metaphors are constellations
and your deep verses
are remote galaxies
Your words travel beyond
time and space
forever eclipsing me
like a lonely particle of love
For you are my sun
I, your loyal moon
a small bewildered child
forever admiring
the infinity of you

.

.

This Thursday I will be volunteering at a local Soup kitchen helping to feed the homeless for Thanksgiving. Thus, I needed to make my second post of the…

View original post 2 more words

Leave a comment

Filed under Being and Feeling, Poetry - Poems, Positive thoughts, Re-Blogs and Great Blogs

Study says highlighting gender leads to stereotypes

When parents are trying to let their kids figure out who they are they have to be careful not to let them hear their biased ideas. Some parents may have such ‘blocked ideas about gender roles‘ that they may impose their ideas of boys and girls roles, way of behaviour, clothing onto their kids.

It becomes more difficult when a person lets his or her parents know they are not feeling right in their skin and do want to have a different body. In case parents see their kids playing other roles than they themselves would be appropriate for the kid they have, they themselves may also become someone who can push the child into an other role. In such instance they have to be careful not to push them falsely or prematurely into decisions about being transgender.

” It’s precisely their presence in a liminal space between clearly defined end points that creates discomfort.”

When parents want to try to help keep their kids from being “different” and “standing out”, they themselves do have to accept the choices the kid itself makes and should give it full support, helping it to find its way in this difficult matter of “Who am I” “What do I want to be” “How may I feel”.

No matter which sex our kids have or want to be, they should feel they have equal rights and are equally accepted as fulfilling youngsters, receiving the time to develop and grow to worthy equal adults.
When “our boys and girls would like to stand out because of their excellent dance, drawing, or sports skills rather than because they look different” we are on the right way of showing society that everybody is created in the image of their Creator and equal in the eyes of God.

+

Find also:  When Teachers Highlight Gender, Kids Pick Up Stereotypes where the study found that in classrooms where boys and girls line up separately — and even in settings where teachers say things like, “Good morning boys and girls” — children express more stereotypes about gender and even discriminate when deciding who to play with.

“The children in these classrooms expressed less interest in playing with children of the other sex,”

said developmental psychologist Lynn Liben of Pennsylvania State University, who conducted the study with graduate student Lacey Hilliard.

“Not only in surveys, but we also observed kids playing in free playtime, and there was a significant drop in the amount of time children in those classrooms were seen playing with children of the other sex.”

+++

  • Louisville, KY school votes to protect transgender rights (mydoorsign.com)
    “We have a responsibility to provide appropriate accommodations for transgender students,” said Thomas Aberli, principal of J.M Atherton High School. He added “this policy is something that really demonstrates our ability to respond to the needs of diverse students. Atherton was the best place for something like this to happen.”
    +
    The Department of Education’s recent guidance issued in April has accelerated the transgender rights cause in schools under Title IX. A proud Atherton alumni and director of policy at the National Center for Transgender Equality in Washington D.C., Harper Jean Tobin sees students and administrators standing up for transgender protections as an increasing trend, for better or for worse.

    This year, 13 other states joined California in issuing a non-discrimination policy for the transgender students in school including the ability to use restrooms and  play on sports teams that match their expressed genders.  Numerous districts, from Salt Lake City and Kansas City to Knoxville, Tennessee, and Decatur, Georgia, have adopted similar protections.

  • Pastors rise up to challenge same-sex bathrooms (mobile.wnd.com)
    Rev. Dave Welch, founder of the U.S. Pastor Council, is leading a petition drive for a citywide referendum on the ordinance, charging the will of citizens is being ignored.The City Council’s approval prompted a mass exodus from the session of local black pastors who had come to speak against the ordinance.

    “It was clear that enough council members had decided to vote with Annise Parker’s personal agenda over the clear will of the people and basic decency in this act of thumbing their nose at respected black clergy who represented all of us,” he said.

    “Our only way of showing that we understood what had happened and to respond effectively was to vote with our legs,” he said.

  • Transgender Activist Wants All Children Born Genderless (personalliberty.com)
    The left-leaning publication Slate published an article Thursday that offers unsettling insight to the primary goal of some militant LGBT activists: Defining every child as genderless from birth.

    In “Don’t Let The Doctor Do This to Your Newborn”, Canadian transgender activist Christin Milloy describes “infant gender assignment”— which means defining a baby as a boy or a girl based on basic biology— as some insidious practice that “might just be Russian roulette with your baby’s life.”

  • Activists call for gender equality revolution (dailystar.com.lb)
    “It is perfectly natural for the future woman to feel indignant at the limitations posed upon her by her sex. The real question is not why she should reject them: The problem is rather to understand why she accepts them,” wrote French writer and feminist Simone de Beauvoir in her book The Second Sex in 1949. For Lebanese feminists Hayat Mirshad and Alia Awada – wearing white T-shirts with the logo of Fe-Male, the non-profit organization they co-founded – this could not ring more true. The dynamic duo have been indefatigably championing women’s causes over the last few years, and explained to The Daily Star that the way to impose change was to revolt against injustice.“If you call yourself a feminist, and you do not believe that there needs to be a revolution, you need to change,” said Mirshad, 25. “The patriarchal society did not ask for permission when it controlled us and oppressed us, so we should not ask for permission to revolt against it.”
  • Slate: Don’t Let the Doctor Assign a Gender to Your Newborn (str.typepad.com)
    Remember when I said that we should expect more attempts to erase the differences between men and women, and that the conflict in our culture over sexuality is, at root, a disagreement over “whether human nature is something in particular or a sea of possibilities bound only by what we can imagine for ourselves”?

    Well, Slate has kindly illustrated that for me in its article “Don’t Let the Doctor Do This to Your Newborn”:

  • Gender Progress Ends Where Pinkification Starts (dissidentvoice.org)
    Boys and girls inhabit two separate worlds whose boundaries are created by the relentless onslaught of commercialism. The toy industry didn’t create gender segregation, but it certainly perpetuates and reinforces it by planting a link between gender and career choice in the minds of young children. The messages sent to toddlers through colours, wording and images remain the same across the board: while girls are encouraged to focus on their appearance and partake in nurturing activities, boys are veered towards more active pursuits. Let Toys Be Toys, a UK-based lobbying group, is advocating label-free marketing and sorting according to themes and interests rather than gender. Created in 2012 by a group of parents galled by the stereotyping of children’s toys, the grassroots movement has already persuaded numerous retailers to make the change, including Boots and Tesco. Let Toys Be Toys campaigner Joanne Watts sheds some light on the group, its goals and the challenges that remain.
  • The Quiet Clash Between Transgender Women And Drag Queens (thinkprogress.org)
    Hillz’s point is at the center of the conflict, because Drag Race is a show that is not about being transgender but that clearly has implications for transgender people — a particularly vulnerable population. People who identify as transgender report incredibly high rates of discrimination across their lives, including in employment, housing, health care, education, and police interactions. The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Program’s recent study found that 72 percent of all violent crimes against LGBTQ people in 2013 targeted transgender women, who also made up 67 percent of LGBTQ homicide victims. One of the most alarming statistics, that 41 percent of transgender people have attempted suicide — compared to just 1.6 percent of the general population — reflects the mental health consequences that result from this discrimination, harassment, and violence.
  • What’s stopping the spread of gender-neutral restrooms? (mydoorsign.com)
    A report by Media Matters collates opinions from 15 experts who unanimously quash the popular theory that trans people are a threat in public, gender-neutral restrooms as baseless and “beyond specious.” The expert group from 12 states includes law enforcement officials, government employees, and advocates for victims of sexual assault.

    In reality, trans people run a higher risk of being attacked in a restroom. Those in the middle of a transition, those who do not transition by choice, those who cannot afford transition, genderqueer, and those who do not live as either male or female are at the highest risk for attack. These people don’t identify with the socially-accepted societal genders and may fear using either single-gender restroom.

 

Pink Is for Boys

Parents with gender-fluid kids often work with schools, churches, and other institutions to use alternatives to gender for organizing kids in the classroom. Rather than dividing kids by boys and girls, use birth months or sneakers vs. sandals, or some other arbitrary distinction or characteristic. Sometimes schools are willing (and even grateful for the tip, which had often never occurred to well-meaning teachers to be problematic). Other times, schools are really uncomfortable with any implied ambiguity of gender. The same feelings are expressed that commenters here often report feeling:

*Why do you have to make such a big deal about it – are you just trying to attract attention, or letting your kid attract attention to him/herself? *Is this spoiling – no one student should get to throw a wrench in the cogs of the school day for everyone else. *Aren’t kids this age too young to even be thinking…

View original post 383 more words

5 Comments

Filed under Being and Feeling, Health affairs, Re-Blogs and Great Blogs

Happiness mapping and getting over gender mapping

For years people did believe that it was important to mark the differences between boys’ and girls’ because they would have different brains, and therefore the two should be taught differently, and possibly separately.

Developing back to such a trend may be dangerous, enabling again creating a trend, which can have damaging consequences – not only in classrooms, but at home and work.

Such claims may often be made on the basis of isolated brain imaging studies that have not been replicated, and in some cases have found to be wrong.

Studies have shown that the differences between the sexes are either non-existent or they are so small so as to be of no practical importance in, for example, an educational setting.
Dr Cordelia Fine presented also such an argument in 2013 at the Australian Council for Educational Research Conference in Melbourne on the brain and learning, where she said that males, for example, are often described as having a “spotlight brain” that processes information such as language in one hemisphere, while girls are supposed to have a “floodlight brain”, using both sides of the brain.

Fine says everyone is a mix of masculine and feminine qualities and there’s no fixed way in which the qualities line up.

“So being good at maths doesn’t make it more likely that you’ll be more aggressive, for example,” she says.

“That’s not to say that biological sex doesn’t make a difference in terms of the brain, brain development, or brain responsiveness, but it does undermine the idea of the male brain and the female brain.”

As part of this idea of a more interconnected female brain, females are supposed to have a larger corpus callosum, the thick band of neurones that connect the two hemispheres.

She says while older smaller studies support these differences, the bulk of more recent data has found otherwise.

+

Additional reading:

  1. Equal?
  2. Welfare state and Poverty in Flanders #3 Right to Human dignity
  3. Poverty and conservative role patterns
  4. Milestones for women ordered
  5. Women their education and chances to become a parliamentary
  6. Gender connections
  7. A bird’s eye and reflecting from within
  8. Father and motherhood
  9. Father counterpart of the mother
  10. Women, conservative evangelicals and their counter-offensive
  11. Dignified role for the woman
  12. Cosmina Craciunescu looks on Positivism
  13. 30 things to start doing for yourself – #6 is vital.
  14. Subcutaneous power for humanity 4 Not crossing borders of friendship
  15. Thirst for happiness and meaning
  16. We all have to have dreams
  17. Happiness an inner state
  18. The business of this life
  19. The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands

+++

 

  • What’s stopping the spread of gender-neutral restrooms? (mydoorsign.com)
    Last year, Philadelphia introduced a pro-LGBT bill that was touted as “the next iteration of civil rights and freedom in the United States.” The bill aims to provide equal rights to the trans community and Mayor Michael Nutter hopes that with this new law, Philadelphia might become “the most LGBT-friendly” city in the world. As part of the new legislation, new or renovated city-owned buildings are required to include gender-neutral bathrooms in addition to traditional men and women’s restrooms.

    In a positive response to transgender students’ complaints of harassment or discrimination, more than 150 colleges and universities have created gender-neutral bathrooms on campus.

    Whether to construct each restroom separately on the basis of socially accepted genders, or to create one restroom that is open for all, is still under debate. Some universities have taken the middle ground, and have built another gender-neutral restroom apart from the already existing gender-segregated ones.

  • Sexing the Brain Part 2: Function, Anatomy, and Structure (psychologytoday.com)
    My previous post, “Sexing the Brain (Early Days)” considered the early approach to consider sex differences in terms of perceptual asymmetries. That post ended on McGlone’s (1980) conclusion that men were more lateralized than women, supporting Levy’s (1971) hypothesis. This conclusion was as definite as it could get in 1980. However, McGlone could not quantify the sex differences.

    From this perspective, my contribution to this debate came in the form of a meta-analysis that quantified the magnitude of sex differences in perceptual asymmetries. In my 1996 meta-analysis (Voyer, 1996), I considered measures of perceptual asymmetries in the visual, auditory, and tactile modalities and provided some support for Levy’s hypothesis.

  • Langton and Dupre try to unconfuse journalists about minds, brains, and gender (leiterreports.typepad.com)
    if the mind is the brain, any mental difference will be a brain difference. Suppose there are some actual mental differences between men and women, whatever their prior causes. (Hard to imagine training up half of humanity one way, half another, without creating some differences between them.) There will then be some neural differences. Suppose you have two televisions, whose images are different. You call in the technician, who trumpets the discovery that they differ in their pattern of pixels.
  • Delusions of Gender: How Our Minds, Society, and Neurosexism Create Difference (sciencebookaday.wordpress.com)
  • Getting in a Tangle Over Men’s and Women’s Brain Wiring (wired.com)
    You may have heard there’s a new study that claims to have found that men’s and women’s brains are wired differently. Published in the respected journal PNAS, the researchers based at the University of Pennsylvania used a technique known as diffusion tensor imaging to plot the brain wiring maps of 949 people aged 8 to 22. Ragini Verma and her colleagues said their results showed “fundamentally different connectivity patterns in males and females.”

    Specifically, they reported that men’s brains had more connectivity within each brain hemisphere, whereas women’s brains had more connectivity across the two hemispheres. Moreover, they stated or implied, in their paper and in statements to the press, that these findings help explain behavioral differences between the sexes, such as that women are intuitive thinkers and good at multi-tasking whereas men are good at sports and map-reading.

  • Brain Mapping Gender Identity: What Makes A Boy A Girl? (kiramoorescloset.wordpress.com)
    An article written by Susan Scutti and posted at the Medical Daily reports on a study published last year which explores the extent to which brain anatomy is associated with gender identity.
    +
    The degree to which one identifies as male or female has a profound impact on one’s life. Yet, there is a limited understanding of what contributes to this important characteristic termed gender identity. In order to reveal factors influencing gender identity, studies have focused on people who report strong feelings of being the opposite sex, such as male-to-female (MTF) transsexuals.
  • So my mushy head is ‘hardwired’ for girly things, is it? If this is science, I am Richard Dawkins | Suzanne Moore (theguardian.com)
    Brain - computer image

    Is female inferiority located in individual brains or in culture? Photograph: SMC Images/Getty Images

    If you cut my head in half, out would spill sugar and spice and all things nice, obviously. The part of the brain that does parking would be small, but the part that organises cupcakes and friendship would fizz like sparkling rose. Because I am a girl whose mushy head is “hardwired” for girly things.

    As ever, when I see the latest stuff on gender differences in the brain, I feel that I am barely female. Some parts of my brain have gone rogue. But before anyone gets out a soldering iron to rewire me, let’s um … think about it.

  • Gender gap a scientific myth, says psychology expert (guardian.co.uk)
    “Avid readers of popular science books and articles about gender may well have formed the impression that science has shown that the path to a male or a female brain is set in utero, and that these differently structured brains create essentially different minds,” says Fine, whose book is published in the UK this week.

    “These cultural lores, which in popular hands can become nothing short of monstrous fiction, are standing in the way of greater sex equality – just as measures of skull volume, brain weight and neuron delicacy did in the past”.

  • Gender and Sexual Diversity (dissidentvoice.org)
    The recent article by Robert Jensen, “Some Basic Propositions about Sex, Gender, and Patriarchy,” espouses concepts that both reflect and perpetuate cissexism and transphobia. Jensen correctly anticipates that readers will recognize much of his article as unabashedly transphobic. He reacts by preemptively dismissing any such observations as mere “tactics.” In the third to last paragraph he writes, “Labeling a radical feminist position on these public policy issues as inherently “transphobic” or describing radical feminist arguments on the issues as “hate speech” are diversionary tactics that undermine productive intellectual and political discussion. A critique of an idea is not a personal attack on any individual who holds the idea.”
  • From the comments, more on LBGT as deserving of respect (marginalrevolution.com)
    If it turns out you are born “different” in these ways (I’m not even sure what are the right words to use to cover all the relevant cases), what is the chance that your social structure will be supportive?  Or will you feel tortured, mocked, and out of place?  Might you even face forced institutionalization, as McCloskey was threatened with?  Most likely things will not go so well for you, even in an America of 2014 which is far more tolerant overall than in times past, including on gay issues.  Current attitudes toward transsexuals and other related groups remain a great shame.  A simple question is how many teenagers have been miserable or even committed suicide or have had parts of their lives ruined because they were born different in these ways and did not find the right support structures early on or perhaps ever.  And if you are mocking individuals for their differences in this regard, as some of you did in the comments thread, I will agree with Barkley Rosser’s response: “Some of you people really need to rethink who you are.  Seriously.”

Marcus Ampe's Space

When we look at the different societies in this world we notice that everywhere people are looking for the same answers and trying to find the best of luck and happiness.

Happy girl 5 Happy girl 5 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

We could have a look at those people around the world and see how much their ideas about happiness co-inside. We could use a scale from 1 to 10 to let them allow to give a rate for them feeling sad, happy, or somewhere in-between in their lives. Such scores could allow us to evaluate whether members were less or more happy as changes took place in their environment or surroundings.

An other way, certainly for places where people are not so literate or can not write, is to let them draw three faces – sad face, moderate face, and happy face. When present at the evaluation and the person is not…

View original post 2,044 more words

4 Comments

Filed under Being and Feeling, Health affairs, Re-Blogs and Great Blogs, Social affairs