Tag Archives: Bipolar disorder

2020 a year of having more idols but also more personal problems

The Spring of 2020 brought something new to the world which made everyone and everything coming to a standstill but brought also many to having psychological problems. At first, it seemed incredible to hear certain churches calling for their members to come to church, even when the governments asked people to avoid contact with many. Some pastors dared to go so far as telling people that if they would become infected with Corona that would be because they had not enough faith. Such saying we can only call “criminal”. Several Christian groups, mainly in Holland wanted people to believe that as faithful people would come to the service they would not be harmed because they would do what God expected from them.

Lots of people got in problem with their mind, having become pulled away from their social contacts by the lockdown. Depression, bipolar episodes, and anxiety attacks were hindermost in the running.

Because depression isn’t often discussed in churches, a great deal of misunderstanding has popped up in this year when there were so many more people with a lot of psychological problems, who could not be helped by medical staff.

We want people to believe that the first step is realising what this disorder isn’t:

“It’s not a character defect, a spiritual disorder or an emotional dysfunction. And chief of all, it’s not a choice.”

Also we want Christians to be aware that it is not, like some Trinitarian preachers wanted their flock to believe

a penalty from God.

When you do not feel well in your skin it is not that God would be punishing you because you would have done something wrong or that you would not have enough faith in Him.

We also must be aware that just because someone seems “happy,” that doesn’t mean they’re healthy or that they really would be happy. Look at the very popular Flemish influencer. Social media seemed to take more people in its ban this year. The advertising flow is drying up, so professional users of social media tell more about their concerns and they seemed for many to provide some good information. After the death of that 21 year old boy more than ever, several influencers came to understand their role in the youthgroups and to realise that good mental health is important.

This way NokNok wants to teach young people that it is normal to not always feel perfect. Staff member Eline De Decker:

“Nobody walks on clouds every day. Sometimes you get up and immediately feel that it is going to be a terrible day. Sometimes you doubt yourself or feel insecure. Or are you stressed or disappointed with friends or family. That is normal.
And that’s all okay. ”

NokNok wants to convey that message clearly and shows young people between the ages of 12 and 16 what they can do to gain more self-confidence, have less stress and go through life as positivo.

Instagram has been around for ten years, and what the app has perhaps achieved best during that period is creating the illusion that users can “work independently” via the platform. Certainly influencers, people who live off sponsored photos on their Instagram profile, are an example of this bogus self-employment.
They live off Instagram, but much more for Instagram – they tweak their entire lives to create the best photos and videos. And once their Instagram goes down, they have nothing to fall back on.

With the rise of social media, the phenomenon of fanship has changed drastically. About ten or twenty years ago, an idol was someone you idolized by hanging posters on the wall, playing CDs, maybe watching movies or TV shows. The relationship fan-
Idol was pretty one-sided: the fan was occasionally thrown a treat – a new song, a TV appearance, a message about a wedding in a gossip magazine – and he or she had to settle for that.

But with digitization, the relationship between fans and idols has turned inside out,
British sociology professor Ellis Cashmore writes in his book Kardashian Kulture, in which he examines how celebrity culture has changed in the 21st century. No longer are fans from outside looking at the world in which their idol lives – they are right in the thick of it.

Certain churches used those idols also in church and wanted to attire people to their meetings by using a lot of music and disco settings. In 2020 we saw a continuation of the pulpits shrinking and even disappearing while bands and lighting have grown. But faith does not come from music, dynamic experiences, or supposed encounters with God. Faith is birthed through the proclamation of God’s Word (Rom 10:17).

Our assurance is threatened.
Whilst certain churches kept calling their flock to the church building, others tried to bring entertaining video presentations. All that attention or focussing on those idols and entertainement made many youngsters feeling even more alone, when there was no such church meeting any more. If we associate God’s presence with a particular experience or emotion, you can ask what happens when we no longer feel it.

We search for churches whose praise band, orchestra, or pipe organ produce in us the feelings we are chasing. But the reality of God in our lives depends on the mediation of Christ not on subjective experiences.

Musicians are given priestly status.
When music is seen as a means to encounter God, worship leaders and musicians are vested with a priestly role. They become the ones who bring us into the presence of God rather than Jesus Christ who alone has already fulfilled that role. Understandably, when a worship leader or band doesn’t help me experience God they have failed and must be replaced. On the other hand, when we believe that they have successfully moved us into God’s presence they will attain in our minds a status that is far too high for their own good.

Division is increased.
If we identify a feeling as an encounter with God, and only a particular kind of music produces that feeling, then we will insist that same music be played regularly in our church or gatherings. As long as everyone else shares our taste then there is no problem. But if others depend upon a different kind of music to produce the feeling that is important to them then division is cultivated. And because we routinely classify particular feelings as encounters with God our demands for what produce those feelings become very rigid. This is why so many churches succumb to offering multiple styles of worship services. By doing so, they unwittingly sanction division and self-centeredness among the people of God.

Scripture is full of exhortations to God’s people to sing and make music to Him. Our God has been gracious to give us this means to worship Him. But it is important to understand that music in our worship is for two specific purposes: to honour God and to edify our fellow believers. Unfortunately, many Christians tend to grant music a sacramental power which Scripture never bestows upon it.

Intense relationship
Those churches who by the years focused more on the show element of their services brought their members now in a situation where the lockdown is felt more as a restriction and limitation. Some even came to find that they could not serve God any more or did not give Him the full worship they had to offer Him. The fact they felt they could not serve their God any more made them feeling very bad. Instead of making them to understand they also could worship God in their own house in their own small bubble, some churches gave them even more a feeling of guilt by keeping to tell them they should not stop coming to the church building.

Against the lonely feeling they said what’s needed was the gathering and coming to feast again for God. But what is really needed is a loving community where people are encouraged to speak up and get help. And that speaking can be done by internet meetings and help can be giving by phone calls as well as by sending material by land mail.

People should know that when fear comes into their heart, they themselves can call to God. They not only should trust on the entertaining sessions of their church.

God Loves You

The fundamental message of the Gospel is that God loves you.
Do you understand?
God loves you. No matter who you are, no matter what you’ve done or where you’ve been, God will always love you. Dr. Kenneth Hutcherson describes it like this,

No matter what kind of situation you may find yourself facing, don’t be afraid, because God will always be with you and have your best interests in mind since He loves you.  Whenever feelings of fear creep into your life, turn to God for the help you need to overcome them and successfully navigate your circumstances.  Whenever you sense God calling you to do something that requires taking a risk, move forward without fear because God will empower you to do whatever He calls you to do.

It’s Alright to Feel Sad

No one likes to feel sad. We frequently try to avoid feelings of pain, or bury them under the weight of our daily routines. But sorrow cannot and should not be ignored. Accepting our sorrow doesn’t mean we’re weak, or a failure, it means we’re human. Just look what Ethan McCarthy of Christianity Today had to say,

Our faith is predicated on sadness. As we grow in Christ’s service, we begin to recognize ourselves in Christ’s sad gaze in the icons. The sadness of Jesus exemplifies the sadness of Christians everywhere, and through it the whole world is redeemed. For the sadness of Jesus is not an ultimate sadness: the Bible also promises the end of sadness, and the wiping away of all tears: ‘Blessed are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted’ (Matt. 5:4).

After bad times better times

2020 may not have been an ideal year, but we should know there have been lots more worse years in the past. When looking at those horrible years of illnesses, pains, horrible situations and wars, we should see that we did not have it as bad as some want us to believe.

Hope is a frail thing, but it’s hard to kill. If you’ve found yourself struggling in the valleys of life, please don’t give up. Surround yourself with friends who will comfort you and mourn with you. If you’re suffering from depression, have courage and make an appointment with a doctor. Above all, remember that God loves you, and that will never change.

2020 has been a year where a lot more people had psychological difficulties. The helplines got a lot more calls. Lots of people were struggling with depression.  More than 1 in 5 youngsters this year had difficulties with the isolation brought unto them. Christians should see signs and then should come to help.

Every suicide is a tragic end to a life that’s precious to God. If you’re willing, God can empower you to help save the lives of people he loves from ending their lives before they’ve completed the lifetimes he intends for them. Here’s how you can help prevent suicide by reaching out to struggling people you know:

Recognize warning signs.

The American Association of Suicidology says that people who are at risk of committing suicide often display warning signs such as: communicating a desire to kill themselves, looking for ways to kill themselves (like seeking access to guns or medications), expressing a lack of purpose or hope in life, demonstrating dramatic mood changes, behaving in significantly anxious or angry ways, sleeping too much or not sleeping enough, feeling trapped in a challenging situation, taking reckless risks, abusing alcohol or drugs, and withdrawing from relationships with family and friends.

Listen well and offer unconditional love, like God does.

Pay attention to the troubling thoughts and feelings that people share with you. Listen carefully to what they express, and ask them questions to clarify and seek more information. If suicidal people know that you’re genuinely interested in them and that they can trust you not to judge them, gossip about them, or avoid them when they tell you something disturbing, they’ll likely open up to you. Ask God to help you love suicidal people unconditionally – like He does – and that will give them hope they desperately need while struggling with embarrassment and shame.

Pray specifically.

Let people know that they can count on you to pray for them about every specific issue they’ve shared with you. Ask God to bring them the help and healing they need, and pray in Jesus’ name against any form of evil that may be attacking them spiritually.

Give people a fresh perspective on themselves and their problems.

Suicidal people often become so preoccupied with their own failures and the problems in their lives that they blow them out of proportion. When that happens, they feel overwhelmed and can’t see how they can ever find solutions to their problems or find relief from their suffering. Mistakenly thinking that there’s no hope for them to experience better lives, they then may choose to simply end their lives. If someone tells you that she hates herself or feels like a burden on others, you can encourage her by pointing out specific ways she has enriched your life. When someone you know is distraught about a problem that seems insurmountable, you can gently and respectfully point out other aspects of her life that are positive to help her gain a better perspective. Refrain from giving unsolicited advice, which can seem judgmental to someone who is struggling. But remind your friend that there’s plenty of good in her, and in her life, despite the bad aspects that trouble her. You can also point out that every problem – no matter how severe – is temporary, but suicide is permanent. Encourage suicidal people to give themselves time to see how their problems can resolve in unexpected ways, rather than prematurely ending their lives.

Strong churches don’t “fix” depression.

Even large churches may not have the framework currently in place to deal with mental disorders. So, what’s needed?

“Healing comes from a prayerful, loving community that seeks to truly understand major depressive disorder and related conditions, and one that develops a positive response.”

Depression can feel like a huge weight that keeps pulling a Christian down again and again. Breaking free from the clutches of this disorder may seem impossible, but Margaret Ashmore (of the Association of Biblical Counselors) says that one of the most important things a sufferer can do is “the next thing”:

“So ‘doing the next thing’ might mean getting right with someone you’ve wronged, making restitution on outstanding payments, putting away once for all that website or magazine which feeds a monstrous, lustful appetite, taking back a purchase of self indulgence whose only outcome was more debt – you will have your own list. I certainly have mine. But be assured, this principle alone can take you from a shrugging Atlas with the weight of the world on your shoulders to that of renewed vigor and reviving refreshment….”

“The choices we make to obey despite our feelings or to give in to the downward pull of a fallen world filled with fallen people – mean everything.”

If you suffer from anxiety of depression, you’re not alone.

The one true source of freedom: Jesus.

People who kill themselves are trying to break free from their pain. But suicide just makes people dead, not free, and it actually causes more pain by spreading grief around to deceased people’s loved ones. Tell struggling people you know that while suicide can’t make them free, Jesus Christ can. Jesus is the way to God. He is the mediator between God and man, and having been here on earth as a man of flesh and blood, he very well knows the pains man can have to face.

No matter how difficult, certain things may look for us, when we pray to God we may find solutions to get over those difficult situations.

 

(With parts of articles by a.o. Todd Pruitt, John UpChurch, Ryan Duncan, Whitney Hopler of Crosswalk.com)

 

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Which Way?

Knowing-Not-Anonymously

I choose to sit, for awhile, on this path….

No more answers or directions, Please!
I can’t not handle more disappointments in me
I don’t want reminded of just how alone I be
It’s not a sad story but just a reality

No regrets on a more solitary life lived
No regrets on doing her best to raise her kids
No regrets on the one’s she chance’d a deeper love to give
It was given and taught to some; a tragic gift bought to live

She has learned to want not & stop all talk
Be still, amongst her thoughts, nonstop
Learning beauty in listening w/no answer[s] to share
Needing not know the answers to any known whys to care

She’s done being a mother and even a lover
She’s done tending to other’s needs for hers to please
She’s wanting her time to do as she feels the need

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Coming Out Of The Bipolar Closet

We like to introduce the online photography gallery for people affected by mental illness and share this witness which can help many people.

Every person should know that it is most importatn always to be and stay your own self, loving your self and loving the others like they are.

To free yourself from the chains and boundaries it is necessary to get rid of secrets and to dare to be open to others. They either may accept you or leave you for what you are. But in this world there are enough people and you can not be befriended with everybody, so it is better you concentrate to become befriended with those who are willing to take you as you are.

Let yourself be known, come out of the dark and let others also come out the closet.

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To remember:
  • Be open about many of your mental health challenges
  • dare to publicly discus them
  • do not hide
  • be not afraid of stigma.
  • Gain the courage to do and act
  • recognize what you have but also that it might be just one piece of your complex mental puzzle
  • We are all individuals on our own twisting journeys to mental health and wellness. 
  • Frustration, anger, guilt, shame, sadness, isolation, self-loathing, and hopelessness
  • Nothing is  hopeless.
  • Feel a shift, and realize you can choose to live.
  • Come to live with the emotional ups and downs
  • Dare to look for help
  • Stop ignoring advice and stop hiding in that damn closet
  • take your meds, see your doctors, and be more self-aware — you can actually take some control, and start moving in a positive direction. One baby step at a time.
  • There are still a few people in your life that find you worth fighting for
  • fight through this for them, and … do it for yourself
  • You are strong. You are capable. You are talented. You are worthy of a life worth living. A change will come.

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Broken Light Collective

Photo taken by contributor Danielle, a woman in her thirties from New Jersey who has suffered from a variety of mental health challenges, including severe depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, as well as traits of BPD, OCD, and ADD. Danielle is a writer, photographer, photo editor and certified professional life coach. she is also a passionate mental health advocate and the founder and director of Broken Light Collective.

About this photo: “I took this self-portrait several years ago, in the midst of a two-year major depressive episode. I had become agoraphobic and spent almost all of my time in that bed. I ate there, I started Broken Light Collective from there, and I even did my therapy from there. This photo represents sadness, fear, isolation, and hopelessness.

I have since emerged from that particular darkness. I still have moments of sadness, fear, isolation and hopelessness, but I also have moments of joy, connection, and hope.

I have been…

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To be relapsing

  • What Is Bipolar Disorder? (doylene.wordpress.com)
    Bipolar disorder is a complex disorder that’s defined by dramatic or unusual mood episodes of highs and lows. The episodes of mania and depression can range from very mild to extreme in their intensity and severity. With bipolar disorder, mood episodes can come on gradually over many days or even weeks.
  • Insights Into Bipolar Disorder (thesecretkeeper.net)
    I do not want the meds but would rather work through “talk therapy” & alternative methods to accept what comes with Bipolar. I enjoy the creative highs and experience the depressive lows and the feelings of suicidal thoughts. But I want to learn to control th behaviors and feelings.)
  • Delight in Disorder (clothedbyjesus.wordpress.com) >Delight in Disorder
    As a society or as people in general we tend to judge or fear what we do not understand.  As mentioned before this is an area that many of us cannot wrap our heads around even if we know someone who is dealing with the complications that go along with it.  This is a great book to help demystify the sickness of the mind and help us accept people who are dealing with it.
  • I’m Writing About My Bipolar Disorder While I’m Learning to Live With It (theroot.com)
    My Thing Is: I’m a teacher with mental illness who’s living proof that everyone’s fighting a battle you know nothing about. That’s why I’ve decided to tell my story.
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    When the crisis worker comes to interview me to see if I’ll be admitted or not, he asks tons of questions. Do I do drugs? Did I do drugs at the concert last night? Am I sure I don’t do drugs? No heroin, cocaine, weed, cigarettes, alcohol? I answer a confident no. My vices are not drugs; they are sex and shopping.
  • We’re All Mad Here (websterhunny.wordpress.com)
    Vincent van Gogh was famous not only for his raw talent, but also for the passionate and emotional nature behind it. Van Gogh is known worldwide as “the crazy guy who cut his ear off”. Although this act was the one that made his madness known worldwide, van Gogh had a history of mental illness and ‘emotional fits’. Today, people believe that van Gogh suffered from bipolar disorder. Van Gogh isn’t the only creative genius believed to have bipolar disorder. Winston Churchhill and Edgar Allen Poe are also believed to have had bipolar disorder. Other artistic geniuses also suffer from psychological disorders, including Joanne Greenburg – depression along with somatization disorder – and Charles Dickens – clinical depression. Certain mental disorders – such as depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, etc – are more likely to be found in the “creative types”, such as writers, artists, and musicians.
  • All About World Bipolar Day (Video) (blogs.psychcentral.com)
    For World Bipolar Day on March 30, 2014, Matthew McKenzie of London, England created a video to celebrate and inform.It shares links and information about the three organizations hosting World Bipolar Day: the Asian Network of Bipolar Disorder, the International Bipolar Foundation, and the International Society for Bipolar Disorders, as well as other information about bipolar.

    Learn more about bipolar, share, and fight stigma.

  • Bipolar disorder and those that suffer from it (followinspire.wordpress.com)
    The different types of bipolar disorder are diagnosed based on the pattern and severity of manic and depressive episodes.  Doctors usually diagnose brain and behavior disorders using guidelines from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, or DSM. According to the DSM, there are four basic types of bipolar disorder:
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    Many people suffer from depression. Whether it is drug-related or just being introverted and obsessed with people pleasing.Bipolar is more black and white…no grey in the middle. They are either manic (up and full of energy) or down to where they stay depressed for days.

    Obsession, anxiety, panic, fear of losing friends and family, all these things related to being bipolar.

    If someone you know has these symptoms, please help get them help. Because without treatment they could either hurt themselves or others

  • I’m a slander. I’m a statistic. And my mania is your cocaine high, except mine is free: Embrace Imperfection, Achieve Greatness (thebipolarbastille.wordpress.com)
    In popculture we often refer to impulsive or contrary behavior as “bipolar.” Anytime someone acts out against societal norm or the appropriate reaction, they are bipolar. It has become a term of slander to insult someone for bad behavior. And these are all completely accurate stereotypes of someone who does actually have bipolar disorder, and unfortunately for the average joe you are slandering, he doesn’t reap the benefits.
  • What is bipolar disorder? (itv.com)
    Bipolar disorder, known in the past as manic depression, is a condition that affects people’s moods, which can swing from one extreme to another. People with bipolar disorder have periods of: Depression – where they feel very low and lethargic Mania – where they feel very high and overactive Les severe mania is known as hypomania
  • Mania Symptom Profile Changes with Age (manicmuses.wordpress.com)
    When I was young, my mania was a much more physical thing.  I’m amazed my family never tried to have me hospitalized.  I think my worst manic experience came when I was 21 or so.  I clearly remember driving like a lunatic in a 25 mph zone and daring myself to crash into a tree.  I almost did it, too.  I’ll never know what stopped me but that is the point where I decided I needed help and saw a doctor.

 

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How do Other People Feel About Mental Health?

We all have the choice either to make something in our life or to let life break us.

We better choose to do something and let not fear prohibit us to take further steps. By falling and standing up we get much further than by lying down and hoping we shall get somewhere.

People who feel sorry with us are perhaps not the right people to stay in contact with or to have a nice liaison with.

People are to fast to say a person has a psychological disorder.It is not because you are not the same as the majority that you would be insane or not normal. It also does not say you have a mental illness, and when a person has a mental ilness it does not mean he or she should not have a place in our society and would not be able to do good in our society.

When a person is facing depression and anxiety this may be at a certain point in his or her life, a moment of mental disease, which can pass and should pass when the person can find the strength in making the right contacts and in starting to believe in him or herself.

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Find also to read:

  1. Fear, struggles, sadness, bad feelings and depression
  2. Anxiety’s Hold
  3. Anxiety is the gap between the now and the later
  4. When discouraged facing opposition
  5. It continues to be a never ending, exhausting battle for survival.
  6. What If you’re only driven by stress?
  7. Depression, Anxiety, Pressure and megachurches
  8. Thanksgiving wisdom: Why gratitude is good for your health
  9. Aligned
  10. Some one or something to fear #2 Attitude and Reactions
  11. Some one or something to fear #3 Cases, folks and outing
  12. Some one or something to fear #4 Families and Competition
  13. Fearing the right person
  14. Searching for fulfilment and meaning through own efforts, facing unsatisfaction and depression
  15. Come ye yourselves apart … and rest awhile (Mark 6:31)

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  • Breaking Taboo….. (nocrybabies.net)
    Of all the taboo topics in the world I think mental illness wins first place for the longest running taboo subject of all time.  We have evolved and come around in matters of sex, gender identity and homosexuality but mental illness……that’s still something most people would rather keep locked up in the dark taboo closet because it is just too uncomfortable to get in to.Mental illness is not just the crazy killer type depicted in Hollywood movies or the crazy guy on the corner yelling at the air.  Many times it something more miniscule like anxiety or depression.  Just like back in the 80’s when people thought AIDS was spread by air or touch, mental illness suffers this same ignorance, this same mis-education of sorts.

    Look around the room you are in, look around your neighborhood, look at your co-workers…..chances are at least one of the people you just scanned over has a mental illness.  Surprised?  Many sufferers are high functioning members of society but they are battling internal forces in the way their mind thinks, perceives and feels.  This does not make them scary, this does not make them unpredictable, this does not make them less of a human being, it just makes them people who have struggles the rest of us do not understand.

  • Ideology and Insanity: What is Mental Illness? (rationaloptimist.wordpress.com)
    the whole enterprise of modern American mind doctoring aims at making us a more collectivist society. That’s the import of his saying “mental illness” labeling is a guise for enforcing social conformism. Szasz maintains that for most people in mental institutions, being “treated” for “their own good” is basically a fiction for what is really imprisonment. Moreover, since Szasz wrote in 1970, there’s been a huge shift from putting mentally ill people in asylums to literally jailing them. (See this recent article in The Economist.)
  • Mentally ill people need to be helped, not hounded | Polly Toynbee (theguardian.com)
    mental health would get “parity of esteem” with physical health, but so far there is little sign of it. Instead the government has just cut the tariff paid for mental healthcare by more than it cut the tariff for physical treatments. Norman Lamb spoke at the launch of the Layard and Clark campaign in the Commons, protesting that mental health “was first to be cut and isn’t getting a fair share of attention”. Had he forgotten that he is himself a health minister who could say no?
  • “Time to change the language we use about mental health” – Gary Nunn for The Guardian (thebigmadexperience.wordpress.com)
    We’ve all had a mental, mad or manic day at work. Frustration has driven us nuts or crazy. Affectionately, we may have referred to an eccentric friend as “bonkers” or “as mad as a box of frogs”. Some people might call a day of very changeable weather “schizophrenic”. The Black Eyed Peas invited us to “get retarded”. Mental health is so ingrained in our everyday vernacular, it’s interesting to me how we now unshackle meaning, intent and potential offence caused by reinforcing negative stereotypes. I spoke to Time to Change, England’s most ambitious campaign into ending discrimination surrounding mental health, for guidance.
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    What of media outlets that have misused language about mental health?
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    If you want to be thoughtful in everyday conversation, what does Time to Change recommend? Nightingale says: “The meaning of words can change over time. ‘Manic’ and ‘mad’ are frequently used in informal conversations and, while we accept they have various meanings, they can also cause offence. Using words like ‘psycho’, ‘nutter’, ‘schizo’ or ‘loony’ to describe someone with mental health problem is certainly offensive and unacceptable. ‘Schizophrenic’ is often misused to mean a split personality, or something that’s very changeable, and usage in everyday speech contributes to the misunderstanding and stigma that there is around this mental health problem in particular, so we would advise against that.”
  • Depression in business leaders (bbc.co.uk)
    Clinical depression is an illness. Unhappiness, whether because of something that has gone wrong at work or because someone has died or divorced is quite different.”When I have clinical depression I get no pleasure out of any of the things I [normally] get pleasure out of. I lose all self-confidence and I never believe I can get out of it.”He says it is “presumptive” to think there must be an external factor – such as work – that causes an episode of depression.

    “The big question is what does cause [these episodes],” he says. “The truth is we don’t really know.” He puts it down to a combination of biological and environmental factors.

    But the mental health charity Mind says work can be the root of mental health problems. Recent research from the charity found it was the biggest cause of stress in people’s lives with one in three people describing it as very, or quite, stressful.

  • Talking About Mental Health: A Teacher’s Perspective (blogs.vancouversun.com)
    It is so meaningful for kids to meet a person who struggles with a mental illness who is doing well in life and is very much a full-functioning member of society. I think it does a lot to dispel some of the stereotypes that we have in our society about people who have a mental illness.
  • The Myths that Society Holds About Mental Illness (drdeborahserani.blogspot.com)
    It is an undisputed fact that individuals who experience mental health issues are often faced with discrimination that results from misconceptions of their illness As a result, many people who would benefit from mental health services often don’t seek treatment for fear that they will be viewed in a negative way.  The World Health Organization agrees and says that in the 400 million people worldwide who are affected by mental illness, about twenty percent reach out for treatment.
  • Anxiety – it may catch you unaware but you won’t let it defeat you! Part 2 (naomihanger.wordpress.com)
    Anxiety is not just something you get over, it takes work, time and energy and many times of falling over and having to get back up and try again. Anxiety is something that may remain a part of your life in some shape or form, but I do believe that it doesn’t have to consume your life. Anxiety may flare up from time to time depending on the situations you are faced with and there may be times when it is a daily battle but for those suffering from anxiety now with intensity and regularity I want to assure that there is hope, living a life without the constant suffocating, all consuming, debilitating monster that anxiety is possible!
  • Mental Illness Across Cultures: An Interview with Gayathri Ramprasad (thereseborchardblog.com)
    As much stigma as there lives in American homes regarding mental illness, it’s much worse in other countries. Gayathri Ramprasad grew up in Bangalore, India, where traditional Hindu culture has no concept of depression. There was no doctor to diagnose her anxiety disorder as an adolescent girl nor medicine to treat the condition.
  • Coming Out Of The Bipolar Closet (godisms.wordpress.com)
    Wonderful article from Danielle of BLC. Her strength and courage in stepping out of the darkness and into the light on BP and depression is so inspiring.
    > Coming Out Of The Bipolar Closet
    I have been open in the past about many of my mental health challenges, and yet, I had never publicly discussed the fact that I have bipolar disorder. I was helping so many other people though my advocacy and Broken Light, and yet I was still hiding. I was still afraid of stigma. A few weeks ago, I decided that I was done hiding. I published the following piece on the Huffington Post. A piece it took me over a year to gain the courage to publish. In the time since it was written, I have come to recognize that bipolar is just one piece of my complex mental puzzle, but in that moment, it felt like everything. I know many of our Collective family can empathize with parts, if not all of this piece, so I would like to share it here as well. Keep in mind that this piece represents my experience, and not necessarily everyone’s experience with mental illness. We are all individuals on our own twisting journeys to mental health and wellness.

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