Tag Archives: Asylum

Grounded

Daily we are surrounded by bad news-stories via the media (television and social media). All those terrible stories can weaken us and manage to bring fear to many (for no obvious reason, because they live far away from the trouble).

Often it is better to detach because it is not possible to live day to day if you spiral into all in the grief in the world. We have to be conscious about it, but may not close our eyes and ears for the beauties that are around us. And for sure there can be found a lot of beauty, even in the smallest thing.

Each of us can help to give others a feeling of safety and comfort in their own surroundings, accepting the wide variety of cultures that can go together anyway.
A person can not love the others without loving himself first and without wanting to share with others.

Today we can see that the fear for the unknown brings many to choose for extreme right wing political groups, which make use of the fear for other people and cultures, and bring the immigration in a wrong exaggerated light. Immigration, by the way, has been there for ages. It is nothing new. Every generation has come to know about some migration.

When we are willing to learn more about the world we and others live in we shall understand the different positions better and come to accept certain things much easier.

When each person is willing to come closer to the other, and is willing to open his mind to come to understand the other better, by willingness of openness of mind and heart the little environment we live in can change, but like a domino falling can bring something bigger changing too.

Let us always remember that a spiritual shaking is always safer than a real earth shaking.

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To remember

All through life when times get tough, when things start to run away with us or when things start to get too much we often hear the advice

“stay grounded.”

  • to balance us, to remind of something solid, something steady

how exactly do we stay grounded when we can’t even trust the ground we walk on?

  • on a little Greek island = best + worst moments of humanity play out on a daily basis => difficult to stay grounded

Facebook safety check icon > pictures of Parliament + London Bridge > horrors + pictures of frantic families trying to trace their missing children

  • a family connected by love
  • memories of places we love
  • distract ourselves from terrorism on our doorsteps with the escalating rhetoric of nuclear war between North Korea and the US?
  • watch white supremacists march the streets
  • ongoing refugee crisis on shores of Italy + Greece
  • hundreds of lives still lost in the Mediterranean
  • hundreds of lives trapped in camps + detention facilities > endless wait for asylum in Europe.

=> pretty hard to stay grounded

=> have become so desensitized

= not go to denial but keep our heads?

  • most important thing = not buy into all the hate.
  • majority of people = kind + loving
  • fear + when we are really scared => ignorance can lead to some pretty extreme standpoints on issues we never really felt too strongly about before.

== to stay grounded we need to start learning more about the world we live in + we need to discover how we can make change.

Stand together, show love where you find hate and don’t let fear win.

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Preceding

Going on holiday is… silence in your head

Summer holiday time to knock and ask, and time to share

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Additional reading

  1. Uncertainty, shame and no time for vacillation
  2. What is life?
  3. Immigration consternation
  4. Would you run
  5. Mountains of information, disinformation and breaking away
  6. Fearmongering succeeded and got the bugaboo a victory
  7. Fear of failure, and fear of the unknown
  8. I Am Not Alone – By: Kari Jobe
  9. Emotional pain and emotional deadness
  10. The soul has no rainbow if the eyes have no tears
  11. Not fear or dread or blind compulsion
  12. Can We Pay The Price To Free Humanity?
  13. The chosen ones to fear or not to fear
  14. Whom Shall I Fear (God of Angel Armies) by Chris Tomlin
  15. Prayer has comforted us in sorrow

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Further reading

  1. What Makes Me Bern about Fear
  2. Fear
  3. “… Fears…”
  4. Worry and Fear
  5. Fear, Surprise, Relief, What’s Next?
  6. Courage is not an absence of fear…
  7. What Fear Can Do To You.
  8. The Power Fear Holds Over Us
  9. Overwhelmed
  10. Anxious And Worried? Pray!
  11. Celebrate Victories Daily
  12. Change
  13. Face Your Fears | Choose Joys
  14. Italy: Migrants from Riace are to be resettled
  15. Criminalization of aid puts migrant lives at further risk
  16. Migration: 416,000 more people moved to Germany than emigrated
  17. After the Crisis? Reflections on Migration Governance
  18. Turkey slams developed nations over migration issue
  19. The migration which is changing the demography of India : The illegal migrants of Bangladesh
  20. The Year of Immigration theme seeks to create a renewed sense of community in College Park
  21. Szijjarto rejects the UN Migration compact
  22. Thousands flee due to crisis, Brazil deploys army to Venezuela border
  23. Parliament condemns the Sargentini Report
  24. Crosses Erected For Thousands Of Dead Immigrants Who Never Reached American Dream – Desert Graves

From Greece With Love

All through life when times get tough, when things start to run away with us or when things start to get too much we often hear the advice “stay grounded.” We are told to “keep our feet on the ground” to balance us, to remind of something solid, something steady that can help bring us down from those dizzying heights that challenging times can take us to. But what happens when that safety net fails, when you can no longer trust the earth to keep you steady?

Recently I experienced a rather nasty earthquake which has left this question playing on my mind. When we live in a world of such uncertainty, how exactly do we stay grounded when we can’t even trust the ground we walk on?

But this idea of losing trust in your surroundings goes further than a shift in tectonic plates, for me personally anyway. Over…

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Let me through- ReFuGe

Today’s thought comes from Divisha Rastogi who completed

an awesome existence of 16 years on 19th march,2016 {Pen Pals…You and me make a better world. – about}

who resides in a small town of north India, Faizabad.

From her sunny country she looks at what horrible things this world overcome.

Screams an cries the throats are dry
On parched ground you lay
Agony and pain, what did you gain?
Ad that war stretched by the day
Realise your worst fears as the end comes near
Your last breath’s a sigh
Regret or relief, what do you believe?
Is the fight worthwhile? {Is the war worthwhile?}

Living in that world she is also fully aware that

When things go wrong,

As they often will

we do have to

Keep holding on, to your strong will.

If life’s headed south, things will eventually turn north again,

Because the world is round my friend

What goes around, comes back around. {When things head south}

It is now already for some years that we do have a worldwide crisis of people fleeing the terror of war. Added to them shall even come more people fleeing the draught and consequences of climate change. The West seeing desperate people thinking they might find heaven on earth in the capitalist Western Europe.

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Pen Pals

Let me through, will you?
For I seek refuge
Just for my child, some food and bed
I think I see a light ahead
Across the bars,
In someplace far
The vision is distant
But I do dream
Help me, will you please?
Urge, for my brother’s release
I seek asylum
For I am distraught
It isn’t done as easy as said
But I think i see a light ahead.

Beyond the Fence .

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4.1 million Syrians having fled their homeland

In December already more than 1 million refugees entered Europe. Some 4.1 million Syrians have now fled their homeland, according to the United Nations, victims of more than four years of civil war in their homeland. This is the latest war to redistribute people from ravaged countries.

After the two world wars the United Nations responded with the 1951 Refugee Convention and its 1967 Protocol which clarified the rights of refugees and the obligations of the 148 members that became party to one or both of these instruments.These obligations have greatly burdened these countries in the current Syrian refugee crisis.

According to the United Nations, those countries in Europe absorbing refugees include:

  • Turkey, which shares a border with Syria, has taken in almost half.
  • Lebanon has taken in over a million, increasing its population by 25 percent.
  • Jordan has taken in 629,000, with about 20 percent living in camps.
  • Iraq has taken in 249,000 despite attacks by ISIS, which has captured portions of the country.
  • Egypt has taken in 132,000. Billionaire Naguib Swiris has offered to buy an island from Greece or
    Italy as a new home for these refugees.

Besides the refugees entering these countries, Europe has received nearly 250,000 asylum requests, many of which will not be processed for several years.  The sheer number of migrants seeking refuge to Europe is so overwhelming and stretching the capacities of these countries that British lawmaker Nigel Farage of the Independence Party has labeled it a problem of  “biblical proportions.”

English: Israeli and Syrian flags

Israeli and Syrian flags (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Around half of Syria’s prewar population of 20 million has been forced from their homes.  A European Parliament resolution in March 2015 condemning attacks on Christians and other minorities said more than 700,000 of 1.1 million Syrian Christians were among those who fled the country. In Iraq, the pre-2003-war Christian population may have been as high as 1.4 million. Estimates today put it at fewer than 350,000.

In the past these situations were already foretold. The Book of books spoke about signs we should come to see. Today many of the signs spoken of should be clear for those who believe in the Only One true God.

The refugee crisis has followed years of unending battles among nations and within nations. Enemies change but the result is the same. Fear and uncertainty are now the norm. Governments in Europe and the U.S. ponder how commitments made long ago can be kept. They see no clear way out of the dilemma, and in many cases, put off inevitable crises with temporary fixes.

 

Read more about in “Today in Prophecy – Syrian Migrant Crisis

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Migration not something to fear

With the terrorist attacks in Paris last weekend, the European Union was shocked again and the social media went as a roller-coaster shouting love and hate messages.

In most messages which tried to bring fear and hate against non-Caucasians and people of an other faith than Christendom we noticed that that’s a gross of given numbers was overestimated a lot. Many overestimate the amount of illegal citizens as well as the amount of refugees.

What does “fair” migration look like? Does protecting citizens’ rights depend upon limiting migrants’ freedoms? Or is migration actually one of the best weapons we have in the fight against poverty, injustice and social immobility – on both sides of our border?

Lets look at real ciphers:

Ten years ago, developing countries hosted 70% of the world’s refugees. In 2014 it could reach 86% of the amount of which those who reached Europe were just a very tiny percentage 4 à 5 %  of the total population of Europe.

The 49 least-developed countries – places like Chad, Malawi, and Yemen – provide asylum to 2.4 million exiles. By whatever measure you choose, the idea that the West is under siege from would-be refugees flies in the face of statistical evidence. In Pakistan, there are 552 refugees for every dollar per capita GDP; that number is 303 in Ethiopia, and 301 in Kenya. For the US, UK and Australia, the equivalent numbers are 5.4, 4.7 and 0.9.

In certain developed states we can see that people move around quite a lot to find work opportunities. This might not be so much in Belgium and Holland, but for France and other countries the locals often have to emigrate to an other place to be able to survive. Spanish, Greek and Portuguese we may find looking for work in Germany.

Most of us, if we move at all, do so within the borders of our own country – from Manchester to London, or from New York to California. In fact, we are at least six times more likely to migrate across a country (from one region to another) than we are to move across a border. There are at least 740 million domestic migrants. Few today would suggest we should restrict these migrations – in fact, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights explicitly prohibits such restrictions. But however obvious this may seem to us, your right to move within the borders of your own is relatively recent. The US Supreme Court, for instance, only definitely confirmed US citizens’ ‘fundamental’ right to ‘move at will from place to place’ across state lines in 1920.

English: Stamp of Moldova: 50th anniversary of...

Stamp of Moldova: 50th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In 2013, according to the World Bank, there were 232 million people living outside the country of their birth. This is a significant number: but it isn’t overwhelming. It means that just 3% of the world’s 7 billion inhabitants are international migrants. The real puzzle about the age of global mobility is arguably not why so many people are moving across borders, but why so many are not.

Lots of people are afraid to loose their jobs when refugees come to live and work in their country. they must see that when more people are coming to live here, there shall be a need of more housing facilities, more products to be made for the growing amount of consumers, and those coming to work here shall also contribute to the social security providing enough money to pay for the older generation which shall be able to do more in their retirement.

Until 2008, Swedish labour migration was among the most restrictive system in the developed world: trade unions ‘had, and used, an informal veto on recruitment’. Today, its labour migration system is one of the most liberal. Employers – having first advertised the job to the local EU market for 10 days – can effectively recruit any worker, for any job, from anywhere. The result? Swedish workers working for firms recruiting labour migrants earn on average 10.5% more than those working in firms that don’t. The recent rise of the far-right Swedish Democrats risks pulling apart this liberal – and successful – model for labour migration

When it comes to inequality, birthplace is destiny. In 2012, researchers at the World Bank determined that no less than 50% of our lifetime income is determined solely by the country we live in — which, for 97% of us, is also the country we were born in.  It’s a citizenship lottery – and those of us lucky enough to be born in wealthy states are automatic winners.

This means international migration is one of the only ways in which individuals can redress the arbitrary inequalities of citizenship assigned at birth. And it works – a migrant who moves from a low-income to a high-income country can expect, on average, a 15-fold increase in income — and a 16-fold decrease in child mortality rates.

Emigration is not a one-way flow: Western citizens leave their home countries too.

In 2014, at least 5.6 million British citizens lived permanently abroad. And while some of them may prefer to call themselves “expatriates”, 40% of these emigrants – an estimated 2.2 million UK citizens – are EU migrants by any other name.  That balances neatly with the 2.3 million EU migrants from other states who have come to the UK.

Did those ex-pats bring problems to the countries they moved to? Did those migrating people bring more criminality in those visited countries?

The US has experienced a 45% drop in violent crime rates since 1990. During the same period, the number of unauthorised migrants climbed from 3.5 to 11 million, and the percentage of the population who were foreign born rose from 8 to 13%. Correlation, of course, is not causation.  But it is a good indication that more migration does not translate into more crime.  And in fact, researchers from the US have similarly concluded that ‘broad reductions in violent crime during recent years are partially attributable to increases in immigration’. In the UK, immigrant “enclaves” – defined as neighbourhoods where at least 30% of the residents are immigrants – have lower levels of crime and victimisation than similar socio-economic areas without a large immigrant presence.

We must be honest and we must be sincerely looking at the reality of the migration issue.

Perhaps it would be better if more people would consider how a migration could keep a certain balance and how the refugees of today perhaps can be the solution for the problems we shall have to face when the boomchildren are going to retire.

Remember also what @Shaimaakhalil by mobilitymuse twittered today

Refugees are not the cause of violence,they are the people trying to flee it. Hope EU leaders remember that as they deal with
  • With thanks for the text-material to “Migrants and Citizens” which poses the big questions we need to be asking about immigration and inequality.

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Preceding:

What we don’t say about the refugee crisis?

Human tragedy need to be addressed at source

Real progress leaves nobody behind

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Additional reading:

  1. Built on or Belonging to Jewish tradition #3 Of the earth or of God
  2. Welfare state and Poverty in Flanders #3 Right to Human dignity
  3. Welfare state and Poverty in Flanders #8 Work
  4. Economic crisis danger for the rise of political extremism
  5. Refugee crisis, terrorist attacks and created fear
  6. Europe’s refugees just follow the ancient routes for the peopling of Europe in the Neolithic
  7. Is ISIS a product of American in-action or a product of direct action
  8. Islamophobic hate crimes rise in UK following terror attacks
  9. Paris attacks darkning the world
  10. Trump brand of migrant demonization #1
  11. Trump brand of migrant demonization #2
  12. Europe and much-vaunted bastions of multiculturalism becoming No God Zones
  13. Wrong ideas about religious terrorism
  14. State and attitude of certain people to blame for radicalisation
  15. The world Having to face a collective failure
  16. Can We Pay The Price To Free Humanity?
  17. Bringing into safety from Iraq and Iran

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Further reading

  1. Welcoming the Refugee – Choosing to Walk Away from Fear
  2. Feelings on Refugees, Post-Paris Attacks
  3. The other side
  4. So many women stand waiting behind fences…
  5. The Migration of the Irish to Newport in the 1800’s.
  6. America, the Not So Promised Land – The New York Times
  7. Walter Noteboom’s Emigration Record from the Netherlands
  8. San Marino and Paris
  9. Beach Bound
  10. Poll: Third of Jewish Israelis favor urging Arab Israeli emigration
  11. The Feld family – part two
  12. Dithane and Doodlebugs
  13. Jews Leave Europe as Arab-Muslims arrive
  14. Armenia’s independence generation
  15. Leaving on a jet plane, don’t know when I’ll be back again!
  16. Moving Home, Moving On
  17. Looking for emigrants from the Rhineland?
  18. I Need to share…
  19. Hello from the other side…

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