Tag Archives: Antoine de Saint Exupéry

Allen zijn wij eerst kinderen geweest


”Alle grote mensen zijn eerst kinderen geweest.
Maar slechts een heel enkele herinnert het zich.”
Antoine de Saint-Exupéry in de De kleine prins


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Filed under Aanhalingen of Citaten, Bezinningsteksten, Nederlandse teksten - Dutch writings

Oplossingen opwekken


”In het leven bestaan er geen oplossingen,
slechts krachten die in beweging zijn.
Je moet ze opwekken en de oplossingen zullen volgen.”
Antoine de Saint-Exupery


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Filed under Aanhalingen of Citaten, Levensstijl, Nederlandse teksten - Dutch writings

True happiness, love and perfection

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True happiness comes from the joy of deeds well done, the zest of creating things new.
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It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye.
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For true love is inexhaustible; the more you give, the more you have. And if you go to draw at the true fountainhead, the more water you draw, the more abundant is its flow.
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Each man must look to himself to teach him the meaning of life. It is not something discovered: it is something molded.

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A civilization is a heritage of beliefs, customs, and knowledge slowly accumulated in the course of centuries, elements difficult at times to justify by logic, but justifying themselves as paths when they lead somewhere, since they open up for man his inner distance.
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The meaning of things lies not in the things themselves, but in our attitude towards them.

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Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.

Perfection is finally attained not when there is no longer anything to add but when there is no longer anything to take away, when a body has been stripped down to its nakedness.

– Antoine de Saint Exupéry

 

 

English: Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, pilot and w...

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, pilot and writer (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Antoine de Saint Exupéry the French aviator and writer whose child’s fable for adults The Little Prince (1943) is not only in the school curriculum to be read, but is the person who lets children and adults dream and believe in their own dreams (born June 29, 1900, Lyon, France—died July 31, 1944, in flight over the Mediterranean) French and writer. His writings exalt perilous adventure and aviation, as in the novels Southern Mail (1929) and Night Flight (1931) and in the lyrical memoir with philosophical musings and meditations “Wind, Sand, and Stars” (1939).

He flew as a commercial, test, and military reconnaissance pilot and was a publicity attaché for Air France and a reporter.
He died when he was shot down on a wartime Air Force mission over the Mediterranean.

Dutch version / Nederlandse versie > Echt geluk, liefde en perfectie

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Find also: What moves mountains? Trust!

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  • The Timeless Tao (zengardner.com)
    it seems we have based so much of our understanding and our culture on empirical, materialistic science, that we have left out the rest of what’s “out there”. We have opted for the linear and causal mode of thinking, rather than what’s circular, unseen, interpenetrating, and spirals. What we’re discussing here is about as far away from petri dish as you can get. The Taoists always matter-of-factly asserted that Taoism exists in all places- all planets, all galaxies, all times, in all extraterrestrial civilisations- not as a religion, but as a flexible kind of science, a non-material science, that can be translated into any language. It just so happens that on our planet, at our particular stage of evolution, Taoism is represented in texts such as the I-Ching in 64 hexagrams. In other words, Taoism adapts to us and not the other way around- and that is the biggest difference between this and other modern religions, especially the Abrahamic ones in which an image of God is made in the image of man. There are no Gods or Deities per se in Taoism, at least not in early Taoism. They came later as psychological byproducts of a growing age of esoterica and cross-acculturation.
  • The Sutra of the Master of Healing (Bhaisajayaguru-Vaidurya-Prabhasa Tathagata) (zenspeaking.com)
    I now ask all beings to light up the lamps and hang up the banners, to set free the animals, and to do good deeds, so that misery and grief can be overcome and the life’ hardships can be avoided.”
  • ‘Towards Global Inclusion of LGBT People Within Catholic Communities’ (jasongoroncy.com)
    Well, each one of us was as shocked as the person next to them: the first-class citizens finding themselves on the same level as us, with all their purity and sense of separateness deflated, and having to overcome a certain repugnance about dealing with people like us; and the second class citizens having to get used to taking ourselves seriously and behave as sons and daughters, rather than dirty servant children who had a sort of built in excuse for impurity.
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    the teaching concerning us being bearers of an objective disorder inclining us to intrinsically evil acts has revealed itself to be a taboo
  • What Is Evil (tvtropes.org)
    Philosophers of morality have, for centuries, struggled with the apparently impossible challenge of objectively proving a “should”, even as most of us deeply believe that, say, murdering innocent children is objectively wrong. Typically, heroes tend to cling to that exact deep conviction; they don’t care for arguing about moral relativism, much like real-life people who see themselves as morally in the right don’t care for it. You could say that this has resulted from aeons of evolutionary pressure on heroes: the ones who stopped to think out the moral conundrums got killed by the Card-Carrying Villain who realized they could use this to Logic Bomb heroes. Meanwhile, the heroes who refused to give in to the villain’s nihilism – either out of boneheadedness, or out of a belief that fighting for what you believe in is a worthy enough goal- persevered. Out-of-universe, the typical lack of moral ambiguity in hero/villain conflict may be attributable to writers just not wanting to waste any effort on that issue, for either ideological or pragmatic reasons.
  • Be Mad At God First (orthodoxyandrecovery.blogspot.com)
    The path of Recovery requires that we drop the pretense: anger is a poison, and it is never justified.  Resentments and condemnation of others is the same judgment and condemnation you will receive.
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    Our afflictions are the path to healing.  Do not resent others for doing what is in their nature to do.  God will deal with them.  You yourself must be healed, and God will only do that if you cooperation.
  • 7 – Essays – Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) (classiclit.about.com)
    nature punishes any neglect of prudence. If you think the senses final, obey their law. If you believe in the soul, do not clutch at sensual sweetness before it is ripe on the slow tree of cause and effect. It is vinegar to the eyes, to deal with men of loose and imperfect perception.
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    Genius should be the child of genius, and every child should be inspired; but now it is not to be predicted of any child, and nowhere is it pure. We call partial half-lights, by courtesy, genius; talent which converts itself to money; talent which glitters to-day, that it may dine and sleep well to-morrow; and society is officered by men of parts, as they are properly called, and not by divine men. These use their gifts to refine luxury, not to abolish it. Genius is always ascetic; and piety and love. Appetite shows to the finer souls as a disease, and they find beauty in rites and bounds that resist it.
  • 49 For 49 (tokenhippygirl.com)
    The wind blows here, it’s blowing somewhere across the world.  It carries life and hazard and is alive in its own way.  It reminds me how gentle or ferocious life can be and that I should try to be gentler, quieter, softer in my approach.  It reminds me how small I am, how big the world is, and that there are people in other places lifting their faces to the wind, closing their eyes, and sighing, just like I do sometimes.

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Filed under Being and Feeling, Lifestyle, Quotations or Citations

Echt geluk, liefde en perfectie

 

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Echt geluk komt van de vreugde van de goed gedane daden, de schil van nieuwe dingen te creëren.
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Het is slechts met het hart dat men juist kan zien; wat essentieel is, is onzichtbaar voor het oog.
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Echte liefde is onuitputtelijk; hoe meer je geeft, hoe meer je hebt. En als je naar de ware hoofdfontein gaat pompen, hoe meer water je optrekt, des te overvloediger is haar vloed.
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Ieder mens moet naar zichzelf kijken om zich de betekenis van het leven te leren. Het is niet iets ontdekt: het is iets gegoten.
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Een beschaving is een erfenis van geloof, gewoonten en kennis langzaam opgebouwd in de loop der eeuwen, elementen soms moeilijk te rechtvaardigen door de logica, maar zichzelf rechtvaardigend als paden wanneer ze ergens heen leiden, omdat ze zich open stellen voor de mens zijn innerlijke afstand.
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De betekenis van de dingen ligt niet in de dingen zelf, maar in onze houding ten opzichte van hen.
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Perfectie is uiteindelijk bereikt niet wanneer er niets meer aan toe te voegen is, maar wanneer er niet langer iets is om weg te nemen, wanneer een lichaam van haar naaktheid is ontdaan.

–  Antoine de Saint Exupéry

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English: Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, pilot and w...

Antoine de Saint Exupéry, piloot en schrijvern (Foto credit: Wikipedia)

Antoine de Saint Exupéry de Franse vliegenier en schrijver wiens kind fabel voor volwassenen De Kleine Prins (1943) niet alleen in de leerplannen staat om te worden gelezen, is de persoon die kinderen en volwassenen laat dromen en geloven in hun eigen dromen. Hij is geboren te Lyon, Frankrijk op 29 juni 1900 en overleed op 31 juli 1944, tijdens de vlucht over de Middellandse Zee.
Zijn geschriften verheffen hachelijke avontuur en luchtvaart, zoals in de romans Zuidelijke Post (1929) en Nacht Vlucht (1931) en in de lyrische memoires met filosofische overpeinzingen en meditaties “Wind, Zand, en Sterren” (1939).

Hij vloog als een commerciële, test en militaire verkenningsvluchten piloot en was een publiciteitsstunt attaché voor Air France en een verslaggever.
Hij stierf toen hij werd neergeschoten in oorlogstijd tijdens een missie voor Air Force over de Middellandse Zee.

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English  version / Engelse versie > True happiness, love and perfection

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Vind ook: Wat verzet bergen? Vertrouwen!

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  • The Sutra of the Master of Healing (Bhaisajayaguru-Vaidurya-Prabhasa Tathagata) (zenspeaking.com)
    my body should be like a crystal in spotless purity both within and without, with splendorous radiant light, in the majesty of its virtue, sitting serenely, adorned with the aureole, brighter than the sun and the moon, I shall reveal my great power to all the beings in obscurity, in order that they may act freely according to their bent.
  • 49 For 49 (tokenhippygirl.com)
    I feel like I’m better at looking outside of myself, outside of my inner dialogue, to the world beyond.  I realize I’m a small drop in a very large bucket.  And what’s more, when I fall back to being too much in my head, too much about me, I can snap out of it pretty quickly by reminding myself there’s more to life, so much more, than me.  It’s my personal version of a mental slap upside my head.  It’s a wisdom thing.  Something I’ve gained with age.  A certain perspective.  I’m grateful for it.
  • 7 – Essays – Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) (classiclit.about.com)
    The world of the senses is a world of shows; it does not exist for itself, but has a symbolic character; and a true prudence or law of shows recognizes the copresence of other laws, and knows that its own office is subaltern; knows that it is surface and not centre where it works. Prudence is false when detached. It is legitimate when it is the Natural History of the soul incarnate; when it unfolds the beauty of laws within the narrow scope of the senses.
  • Be Mad At God First (orthodoxyandrecovery.blogspot.com)
    For countless centuries, perhaps even from the beginning, man has often viewed the world with an ‘us-versus-them’ attitude.  His classical approach to life is that those who are not for him are against him, and that those against him are pure evil and a dire threat.
    After all, the ‘Other’ takes our stuff and makes a mess we have to clean up.  The ‘Other’ is selfish and greedy and inconsiderate.  Of course, we are never like that.  We are always perfect.  It is the Them that has all the problems.
  • What Is Evil (tvtropes.org)
    Characters have all sorts of reasons for bringing up the subjectivity of morality – perhaps they are the Constantly Curious Philosopher who wants to get to the bottom of things; perhaps they are The Fettered, acutely aware of the difficulty and complexity of their quest, moral hazards included; and then perhaps they are trying to fundamentally shake some kind of hero who believes themselves to be acting in the name of absolute good. This last flavor is by far the most common, and is a favorite tactic of the Straw Nihilist, the Card-Carrying Villain, and The Übermensch who adheres to Blue and Orange Morality and believes himself Above Good and Evil.

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Filed under Aanhalingen of Citaten, Levensstijl, Nederlandse teksten - Dutch writings, Voelen en Welzijn

What moves mountains? Trust!

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry near Montreal, Canada (May 1942)

Antoine de Saint Exupéry was a passionate searcher. He was passionate about life, about spirituality, the depth of mystery. But, for a long time, for him too the skies remained silent. Notwithstanding all his sustained trials, his prayers were not heard. Until one day he discovered that the biggest mercy of prayer consists in – not being heard.
 
Prayer itself  is mercy.
Every human being  sooner or later is confronted with sorrow, suffering, saying goodbye, and come across questions that are not answered or are confronted with problems that cannot be solved. We try everything, but nothing succeeds, nothing works, nothing moves – not through willpower, not through sustained prayer. Sooner or later we ask ourselves: why?

We want an answer.

Español: Interior del Museo Antoine de Saint-E...

Interior Museum of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry in Tarfaya (Morocco) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A sign. In this way in spite of ourselves, we imagine what is good for us. We create an image  that we need to be helped and how and when this should happen. It is exactly at this point that de Saint Exupéry discovered that the answer to his prayer did not coincide with the images he had in mind. He realised that the answer to his prayer exceeds the image created by us. It does not allow to be steered, or the use of words and is only  to be understood by the heart. From a heart that exists through… trust.

Only belief that trusts completely can accept the holy ground of ‘not understanding’.
When we touch the bottom of  intense doubt with our problems – and yet trust – true belief surges. Something becomes visible and tangible which we would otherwise never see, feel or experience.

Then we may discover with surprise, with an inner certitude that does not need a rational explanation, that -in essence- we are inspired.

And stronger : right through the agony of doubt, paradoxally enough, we find inner peace.

BZN Movement Without a Name Proverb of the month

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Additional reading:

  1. A ruffled mind makes a restless pillow
  2. Rejoice even though bound to grieve
  3. The soul has no rainbow if the eyes have no tears
  4. Trouble is coming
  5. Do not be so busy adding up your troubles
  6. Life’s challenges may not paralyse you
  7. A small trouble is like a pebble
  8. Remembering from times of trouble
  9. Anxiety is the gap between the now and the later
  10. If your difficulties are longstanding, try kneeling
  11. A problem not worth praying about isn’t worth worrying about
  12. Give your tears to God
  13. Crying and trusting ones do not get disappointed
  14. Call unto God so that He can answer you
  15. Let God’s promises shine on your problems
  16. Don’t put a question mark where God put a period
  17. Don’t wait to catch a healthy attitude
  18. Fearing the right person
  19. Trust the future to God
  20. Stick to one God
  21. Trust God to shelter, safety and security
  22. God is my refuge and my fortress in Him I will trust
  23. Be convinced that we are loved
  24. Love been perfected with us
  25. Faithfulness when most necessary
  26. Have a little talk with the Potter
  27. Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement
  28. A person is limited only by the thoughts that he chooses
  29. A Living Faith #1 Substance of things hoped for
  30. What loneliness is more lonely than distrust?
  31. Confidence
  32. Hope begins in the dark
  33. It is not try but trust

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  • Secret ― Antoine de Saint-Exupéry (misssfaith.com)
    Throw away all the worries about being not perfect – you are perfect just the way you are and a big smile from a happy heart is much more worth than a fake laugh of a wrinkle-less face.
  • In Search of the Little Prince (kirkusreviews.com)
    A scene of Saint-Exupéry working on the manuscript for Le Petit Prince includes a peek at his imagined characters; the delightful back cover depicts the Little Prince and Tonio, shoes off, sitting in opposite chairs, apparently deep in speculative conversation.
  • Antoine de Saint-Exupéry: The Little Prince (headbutler.com)
    When Robin Williams died, my Facebook screen lit up with one quote after another from “The Little Prince.”I didn’t understand why so many people responded with lines from this book.
  • Why Did “The Little Prince” Quotes Suddenly Appear After Robin Williams’ Death? (goodmenproject.com)

    One sees clearly only with the heart. What is essential is invisible to the eye.

    You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed.

    All grown-ups were once children… but only few of them remember it.

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    those Facebook friends mourning a grown-up who never lost his connection to the child within? They knew just where to look.
  • 7 Best Book Covers Of All Time (whytoread.com)
    Few stories are as widely read and as universally cherished by children and adults alike as The Little Prince. Richard Howard’s translation of the beloved classic beautifully reflects Saint-Exupéry’s unique and gifted style. Howard, an acclaimed poet and one of the preeminent translators of our time, has excelled in bringing the English text as close as possible to the French, in language, style, and most important, spirit. The artwork in this edition has been restored to match in detail and in color Saint-Exupéry’s original artwork. Combining Richard Howard’s translation with restored original art, this definitive English-language edition of The Little Prince will capture the hearts of readers of all ages.
  • The Little Prince And The Better Parts Of Javascript (greenido.wordpress.com)
    The little price“It seems that perfection is attained not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing more to subtract.”
  • It’s a Little Lonely (bronwendeklerk.com)
    “Where are the people?…It’s a little lonely in the desert…”
    “It is lonely when you’re among people, too”
  • Inspired by His Love (enteringthepromisedland.wordpress.com)
    Indwelt by the light of God that continually produces good works springing from that love God has poured into our heart before (Rom 5:5), we can experience that there is nothing greater in this world and beyond than His Love offers. God’s Love is better than being right, better than being successful, better than being known, and better than possessing all material things one could wish for.
  • Storytelling, Culture, and Revolution (goodmenproject.com)
    A story might simply be a story if it stands by itself — in a vacuum. Yet, a story rooted in our life experiences is not just a story. It is much more. In it we find revealed the particular relationship that we, the storytellers, have with our environment. Individual stories are part of the fabric that is our worldview. Stories, whether fictitious or true, spring forth from our values, believes, perceptions, dreams, imaginations or wishes, all of which are bound to our life experiences, which in turn are fundamentally shaped by our particular environment. The stories, then, that we tell ourselves are bound up in a feedback system whereby our lives find expression in stories which are in turn enacted by us. If, as Ishmael tells us, we believe that the world was made for man (i.e. man as the climax of the whole cosmic drama of creation) and that we are at odds with nature’s distasteful, dehumanizing elements (i.e. moving beyond the wretchedness of the animal condition), then the stories that we will write and enact are stories of conquest, progress, and an alienation from nature.

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Filed under Being and Feeling, Movement Without a Name, Spiritual affairs

Wat verzet bergen? Vertrouwen!

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry in de buurt van Montreal, Canada (mei 1942)

Antoine de Saint Exupéry was een hartstochtelijke zoeker. Hij was gepassioneerd door het leven, door spiritualiteit, de diepte van het mysterie. Toch, lange tijd zweeg ook voor hem de hemel. Ondanks al zijn volgehouden pogingen werden zijn gebeden niet verhoord. Tot hij op een dag plots ontdekte dat de grootste genade van het gebed erin bestaat – dat het niet wordt verhoord.

Het gebed zelf is de genade.
Elke mens leeft vroeg of laat met verdriet, lijden, afscheid nemen, heeft vragen waarop geen antwoorden komen of staat voor problemen waar hij geen oplossing voor vindt. We proberen alles, maar niets lukt, niets werkt, niets komt in beweging – niet met onze wilskracht, niet met ons volgehouden gebed. Vroeg of laat stellen we ons de vraag: waarom?

We willen een antwoord.
Een teken. Zo maken wij onwillekeurig een voorstelling van wat goed is voor ons. Wij maken een beeld van hoe wij dienen geholpen te worden en hoe en wanneer dat best zou gebeuren. Precies hier ontdekte de Saint Exupéry dat het antwoord op zijn gebed niet samenvalt met de voorstellingen die hij voor ogen hield. Hij ging inzien dat het antwoord op zijn gebed voorbijgaat aan het door ons gemaakt plaatje. Het verdraagt geen sturing of woorden en is alleen te ‘begrijpen’ vanuit ons hart. Vanuit een hart dat leeft van… vertrouwen.

Enkel geloof dat grenzeloos vertrouwt, kan de heilige grond van ‘niet begrijpen’ aanvaarden.

Español: Exterior del Museo Antoine de Saint-E...

Buiten het Museo Antoine de Saint-Exupéry in Tarfaya (Marokko) (Foto credit: Wikipedia)

Waar wij de bodem van de diepste vertwijfeling raken met onze problemen – en toch vertrouwen – daar welt écht geloof op. Daar wordt iets zichtbaar en voelbaar dat wij anders nooit zouden kunnen zien, voelen of ervaren.

Daar mogen wij wonder genoeg ontdekken, met een innerlijke zekerheid die geen rationele verklaring nodig heeft, dat wij – in wezen – gedragen worden.

Sterker nog: dwars doorheen de vertwijfeling vinden wij paradoxaal genoeg innerlijke vrede.

Bond zonder Naam spreuk van de maand : oktober 2014

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Aanvullende lectuur:

  1. Jubelen alhoewel ook droevig
  2. De ziel heeft geen regenboog als de ogen niet tranen
  3. Woorden in de Wereld
  4. Wees niet zo bezig met het optellen van uw problemen
  5. Een kleine moeite is als een kiezelsteen
  6. Emotioneel op slot zitten
  7. De uitdagingen van het leven mogen u niet verlammen
  8. Angst is de kloof tussen het nu en later
  9. Als je problemen al langdurig zijn, probeer te knielen
  10. Een probleem dat niet waard is om te bidden is het niet waard zorgen over te maken
  11. Laat Gods beloften schijnen op jouw problemen
  12. Geef je tranen aan God
  13. Roep tot God zodat Hij u kan verhoren
  14. Zet geen vraagteken waar God een punt plaatste
  15. Wacht niet op anderen voor een gezonde houding
  16. Als u integriteit hebt
  17. Laat de vrede vandaag met jou zijn
  18. Vrees hebben voor de juiste persoon
  19. Vertrouw de toekomst aan God toe
  20. Roependen en vertrouwenden worden niet beschaamd
  21. Hou vast aan één God
  22. Vertrouw de schuilplaats, veiligheid en geborgenheid die God voorziet
  23. God is mijn toevlucht, mijn fort en sterkte, op Hem zal ik vertrouwen
  24. Wees overtuigd dat wij geliefd zijn
  25. Liefde die werkelijkheid is geworden
  26. Trouw wanneer het meest nodig is
  27. Praat een beetje met de Pottenbakker
  28. Optimisme is het geloof dat leidt tot succes
  29. Een persoon wordt alleen beperkt door de gedachten die hij kiest
  30. Welke eenzaamheid is meer eenzaam dan wantrouwen?
  31. Hoop begint in het donker
  32. Het is niet proberen maar vertrouwen

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  • Secret ― Antoine de Saint-Exupéry (misssfaith.com)
    Throw away all the worries about being not perfect – you are perfect just the way you are and a big smile from a happy heart is much more worth than a fake laugh of a wrinkle-less face.
  • In Search of the Little Prince (kirkusreviews.com)
    A scene of Saint-Exupéry working on the manuscript for Le Petit Prince includes a peek at his imagined characters; the delightful back cover depicts the Little Prince and Tonio, shoes off, sitting in opposite chairs, apparently deep in speculative conversation.
  • Antoine de Saint-Exupéry: The Little Prince (headbutler.com)
    When Robin Williams died, my Facebook screen lit up with one quote after another from “The Little Prince.”I didn’t understand why so many people responded with lines from this book.
  • Why Did “The Little Prince” Quotes Suddenly Appear After Robin Williams’ Death? (goodmenproject.com)

    One sees clearly only with the heart. What is essential is invisible to the eye.

    You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed.

    All grown-ups were once children… but only few of them remember it.

    +

    those Facebook friends mourning a grown-up who never lost his connection to the child within? They knew just where to look.
  • 7 Best Book Covers Of All Time (whytoread.com)
    Few stories are as widely read and as universally cherished by children and adults alike as The Little Prince. Richard Howard’s translation of the beloved classic beautifully reflects Saint-Exupéry’s unique and gifted style. Howard, an acclaimed poet and one of the preeminent translators of our time, has excelled in bringing the English text as close as possible to the French, in language, style, and most important, spirit. The artwork in this edition has been restored to match in detail and in color Saint-Exupéry’s original artwork. Combining Richard Howard’s translation with restored original art, this definitive English-language edition of The Little Prince will capture the hearts of readers of all ages.
  • The Little Prince And The Better Parts Of Javascript (greenido.wordpress.com)
    The little price“It seems that perfection is attained not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing more to subtract.”
  • It’s a Little Lonely (bronwendeklerk.com)
    “Where are the people?…It’s a little lonely in the desert…”
    “It is lonely when you’re among people, too”
  • Inspired by His Love (enteringthepromisedland.wordpress.com)
    Indwelt by the light of God that continually produces good works springing from that love God has poured into our heart before (Rom 5:5), we can experience that there is nothing greater in this world and beyond than His Love offers. God’s Love is better than being right, better than being successful, better than being known, and better than possessing all material things one could wish for.
  • Storytelling, Culture, and Revolution (goodmenproject.com)
    A story might simply be a story if it stands by itself — in a vacuum. Yet, a story rooted in our life experiences is not just a story. It is much more. In it we find revealed the particular relationship that we, the storytellers, have with our environment. Individual stories are part of the fabric that is our worldview. Stories, whether fictitious or true, spring forth from our values, believes, perceptions, dreams, imaginations or wishes, all of which are bound to our life experiences, which in turn are fundamentally shaped by our particular environment. The stories, then, that we tell ourselves are bound up in a feedback system whereby our lives find expression in stories which are in turn enacted by us. If, as Ishmael tells us, we believe that the world was made for man (i.e. man as the climax of the whole cosmic drama of creation) and that we are at odds with nature’s distasteful, dehumanizing elements (i.e. moving beyond the wretchedness of the animal condition), then the stories that we will write and enact are stories of conquest, progress, and an alienation from nature.

4 Comments

Filed under Bond Zonder Naam, Geestelijke aangelegenheden, Nederlandse teksten - Dutch writings, Voelen en Welzijn