Tag Archives: American Jews

American Judaism: Reform, Conservative, Orthodox and Reconstructionist

 

Mark Beré Peterson: The Humanities focused on Ancient History, Food, Culture, Myth and Magic.

Whether you refer to them as denominations, streams, movements or branches the American Jewish experience is as diverse as their interpretation of traditional Jewish law or halacha. Outside North America, the non-Orthodox streams of Judaism play a less significant role, and in Israel the vast majority of synagogues and other Jewish religious institutions are Orthodox, even though most Israeli Jews do not identify as Orthodox. Evenwithin North America, the role of the movements has diminished somewhat in recent years, with growing numbers of American Jews and Jewish institutions identifying as “just Jewish.”

The largest affiliation of American Jews, some 35 percent of Jews identify asReform. The movement emphasizes the primacy of the Jewish ethical tradition over the obligations of Jewish law. The movement has traditionally sought to adapt Jewish tradition to modern sensibilities and sees itself as politically progressive and social-justice oriented while emphasizing personal choice in matters…

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Anti-Semitism in the United States

Although in many ways the U.S. Jewish population is flourishing, concerns about anti-Semitism have risen among American Jews. In the recent Pew Research Center’s survey of U.S. Jews, conducted from Nov. 19, 2019, to June 3, 2020, three-quarters say there is more anti-Semitism in the United States than there was five years ago, and just over half (53%) say that “as a Jewish person in the United States” they feel less safe than they did five years ago.

Probably this has a lot to with the way Donald Trump created a poisoned atmosphere.

Politically, U.S. Jews on the whole tilt strongly liberal and tend to support the Democratic Party, but the last few years in that party were many extreme right people who wanted a white Christian nation. When the new survey was fielded, from late fall 2019 through late spring 2020, 71% a lot of Jews said  they were still Democrats or leaned Democratic. Among Jews of no religion, roughly three-quarters were Democrats or leaned that way. But those who saw how their president went in against God’s Commandments could not support that party that had betrayed all democratic values.
Orthodox Jews have been trending in the opposite direction, becoming as solidly Republican as non-Orthodox Jews are solidly Democratic. In the run-up to the 2020 presidential election, 75% of Orthodox Jews said they were Republicans or leaned Republican, compared with 57% in 2013. And 86% of Orthodox Jews rated then-President Donald Trump’s handling of policy toward Israel as “excellent” or “good,” while a majority of all U.S. Jews described it as “only fair” or “poor.”

Jews who wear distinctively religious attire, such as a kippa or head covering, are particularly likely to say they feel less safe. But the impact on behaviour seems to be limited: Even among those who feel less safe, just one-in-ten – or 5% of all U.S. Jews – report that they have stayed away from a Jewish event or observance as a result.

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Preceding

Seeds from the world creating division and separation from God

The Rise of Anti-Seminism

Growing anti-Semitism possible sign of certain times

Quiz questions, views, left- and right-wing anti-Semitism

Historian Deborah Lipstadt Assesses the New Anti-Semitism

Trump’s rhetoric is infusing a culture of Anti-Semitism

Month of freedom and liberty with Independence Day or Deceived day

Judaism and Jewishness in 2020 America

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Additional reading

  1. In Every Generation: The Return of Anti-Semitism – Pesah Day 1, 5779
  2. The fight against anti-Semitism is also a fight for a democratic, value-based Europe
  3. 2019 was #4 a Year of much deceit in Belgium and the rest of Europe
  4. ….a powerful way to put the universe on notice….
  5. A Secret of our Enemy :Inter-Ethnic Fault Lines Among the Jews (Full Article)
  6. A vibrant and inclusive movement within the American Jewish community

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Filed under Being and Feeling, Cultural affairs, Lifestyle, Religious affairs

Judaism and Jewishness in 2020 America

A new Pew Research Center survey finds that many Jewish Americans participate, at least occasionally, both in some traditional religious practices – like going to a synagogue or fasting on Yom Kippur – and in some Jewish cultural activities, like making potato latkes, watching Israeli movies or reading Jewish news online.  The same could perhaps be said for European Jews.

Among young Jewish adults, however, two sharply divergent expressions of Jewishness appear to be gaining ground – one involving religion deeply enmeshed in every aspect of life, and the other involving little or no religion at all.

For Europeans it might be strange that overall, about a quarter of U.S. Jewish adults (27%) do not identify with the Jewish religion. Like all over the world we can find the strong feeling of ethnicity, more than religiosity.  The 27% U.S. Jewish adults who consider themselves to be Jewish ethnically, culturally or by family background, even when they have a Jewish parent or were raised Jewish,  answer a question about their current religion by describing themselves as atheist, agnostic or “nothing in particular” rather than as Jewish. Among Jewish adults under 30, four-in-ten describe themselves this way.

The two branches of Judaism that long predominated in the U.S. have less of a hold on young Jews than on their elders.
In 2013 the Conservative movement was the second largest of the three main religious denominations within American Judaism, claiming 18 percent of American Jews. In some years in the 1950s, the movement was adding 100 new affiliate congregations annually.
In the 21st century, the movement’s long-term viability has continued to be drawn into question. The percentage of Jewish households that identified as Conservative dropped by 10 points — from 43 to 33 percent — between 1990 and 2000, according to surveys of the American Jewish population conducted in those years. By the end of the century, the movement was in serious decline, in such a way that some were fretting openly that Conservative Judaism was on the road to oblivion. About fifteen years ago Rabbi David Wolpe suggested that Conservative Judaism be rebranded as Covenantal Judaism. That name we hear also here and there in our regions, where some Jews and Jeshuaists consider themselves Covenantal Jews.
Today roughly four-in-ten Jewish adults under 30 identify with either Reform (29%) or Conservative Judaism (8%), compared with seven-in-ten Jews ages 65 and older.
Among Jews ages 18 to 29, 17% self-identify as Orthodox, compared with just 3% of Jews 65 and older. And fully one-in-ten U.S. Jewish adults under the age of 30 are Haredim (often known in English as “ultra-Orthodox.”), (11%), compared with 1% of Jews 65 and older. Approximately 1.2 million Haredim live in Israel, jealously guarding their traditions.

Strangely enough, or perhaps not, we can find several Jews who are somewhere “in-between”, themselves found to be not a believer, but who have not given up upon Jewish religious practice. some of them have even adopted more religious practices than they were ever raised with.
In the States, like in Canada and West Europe we find lots of Jews who adopted a religious Jewish lifestyle for themselves, in a similar way we have seen Christians also creating their own religious system and spiritual lifestyle.

In fora we can see that the participants who no longer believe were raised in various Orthodox communities around the world, ranging from Modern Orthodox to Yeshivish to Hassidic; and most spent their childhoods and years of their adulthoods studying in houses of Torah learning. Some were rabbis themselves, educators who dedicated years of their lives to spreading love of Torah and traditional Judaism among the Jewish people. {Why can’t I be secular?}

Remarkable is to notice that in the U.S.A. the youngest U.S. Jews count among their ranks both a relatively large share of traditionally observant, Orthodox Jews and an even larger group of people who see themselves as Jewish for cultural, ethnic or family reasons but do not identify with Judaism – as a religion – at all.  For non-Jews the difference is mostly not made, which gives a totally wrong view of Jews, them thinking all those things those civilian non-believing Jews do against Torah would be in line or acceptable to all Jews.

In the U.S., the same as in Europe, we can see that the youngsters, though not so interested to know if the food is kosher or not, still like a lot of traditional foods. As such, they like cooking traditional Jewish foods, visiting Jewish historical sites and listening to Jewish or Israeli music. Yet the survey finds that most people in the latter group (Jews of no religion) feel they have not much or nothing at all in common with the former group (Orthodox Jews). For many youngsters the Jewish traditions and lifestyle may feel outdated. Others may become unsettled because they find people in their forties searching for ways to live more in line with their ancestors, going back to the synagogue and praying again in the house. Some want to delve into the deeper meaning of Jewishness and Judaism.

It is a fact that Jews and Jeshuaists are a minority. For the U.S.A. in absolute numbers, the 2020 Jewish population estimate is approximately 7.5 million, including 5.8 million adults and 1.8 million children (rounded to the closest 100,000). The 2013 estimate was 6.7 million, including 5.3 million adults and 1.3 million children. The precision of these population estimates should not be exaggerated; they are derived from a sample of the U.S. public that is very large compared with most surveys (more than 68,000 interviews) but are still subject to sampling error and other practical difficulties that produce uncertainty. Furthermore, the size of the Jewish population greatly depends on one’s definition of who counts as Jewish.

Most U.S. Jews identify as Democrats, but most Orthodox are Republicans

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Find also to read

Judaism and Jeshuaism a religion of the future

Jewish Americans in 2020

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Related

  1. American Conservative Judaism
  2. Covenantal Judaism: Ki Tavo 5780
  3. On Rosh Hashanah, a sermon to the unwelcome
  4. Converting to Judaism sparks political uproar in Israel
  5. Opening Israel to non-Orthodox Converts Should Have Happened Long Ago
  6. A Journey of Discovery
  7. Messianic Jews Say ‘Fake Rabbi’ Was Wrong Way to Reach the Ultra-Orthodox
  8. Reform Jews Should Recite Qorbanot in Prayer
  9. Parshat Eikev
  10. Why can’t I be secular?
  11. The Jewish teddy bear
  12. What I’m Watching
  13. Oh, come on, or: Srsly?

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Filed under Being and Feeling, History, Lifestyle, Religious affairs, Social affairs

Trump’s rhetoric is infusing a culture of Anti-Semitism

“It’s clearly a sign that Trump’s rhetoric is infusing a culture of Anti-Semitism and hate against Jews and any group that doesn’t fit into the White Nationalist mindset.
These days are a very crucial time for American Jews to fight back against all threats made by extremists who are very ignorant about history and hope to keep us paranoid and scared.”

Eric Morris Eskenazi

 

Also in the U.S.A. Jews are frequent targets of hateful vandalism.
Here are some numbers from the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s report on hate crimes in the U.S. in 2017, which show how much of the hate crime vandalism reported in the U.S. that year targeted Jews.

Instances of hate crime vandalism: 2,325
Instances of hate crime vandalism targeting Jews: 691
Proportion of hate crime vandalism that targeted Jews: 30%
Proportion of Americans who are Jewish: Around 2%

Read more:

  1. White Nationalism Is Spreading In The Orthodox Community
  2. Spike In Anti-Semitic Vandalism: What You Need To Know
  3. Think About The Spike In Anti-Semitic Vandalism

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Filed under Crimes & Atrocities, Headlines - News, Lifestyle, Political affairs, Quotations or Citations, Welfare matters

When believing in God’s existence and His son, possessing a divine legislation

When you believe today and now it is one step in the right direction. Once you have the right faith that can move mountains, you also need to act according to that faith.

English: The Numbering of the Israelites, as i...

The Numbering of the Israelites, as in Numbers 1, engraving by Henri Félix Emmanuel Philippoteaux (1815–1884) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It means you are convinced that there is an Existent complete in all the senses of the word ‘existence.’ It means you do not doubt any more that He is the cause of all existence. You not only know that in Him all else subsists and from Him derives everything, but you want to share this knowledge with others. It is like when you are in love, you feel bright and full of fire with butterflies in the stomach. You do not want to be quiet about it any more. You want to tell everybody.

The existing Supreme Being making you to exist makes you longing for Him and out of thankfulness for your being you want to share your life with other creations of this Most High. You know

“for should He not exist the existence of all else would he extinguished, and nothing could persist.”

Like the Israelites possess a divine legislation — laws, commandments, ordinances, rules of life, instruction in the Will of God as to how they should conduct themselves in order to attain temporal and eternal felicity, we as Christians also are willing to accept those ordinances of the Most High Divine Creator as the only just solution for mankind. therefore we do know it is necessary that more people get to know those rules and regulations.

Foster Bible Pictures 0067-1 Moses Is Holding ...

Foster Bible Pictures 0067-1 Moses Is Holding Up His Rod (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Moses revealed to the Israelites propositions and prescriptions of this kind in a miraculous and supernatural manner, but no doctrinal opinions, no saving truths, no universal propositions of reason. Moses wrote everything down so that next generations could also get to know what to do and how to arrange their life.

We have to come to see that we are obliged to believe in God and to follow His Given Word by which his only begotten son came to declare his heavenly Father and to make it clear what we have to do. This Nazarene Jew asked his disciples to go out in the world and to preach the Good News of the coming Kingdom of God. In case we call ourselves Christian we should be followers of Christ. As followers of this son of God we should listen to his words and accept what he says. We should follow his teachings and follow up the tasks he has given his disciples.

Belief in God does not require us to comprehend the incomprehensible. It is impossible to know everything or to understand everything. But we should help each other. We should help each person around us to come to see more clear and to receive more wisdom in the works of God. The only way to do is when we are willing to share our knowledge and to accept more knowledge from others. Together we should exchange ideas.

From Guestwriters is one of those places where more than one writer, more than one believer can share his or her thoughts with others and give others the opportunity to think about certain matters.

When we truly believe in God and in His only begotten son to be the Messiah, it requires that we have a faithful life, living and behaving by our best understanding of God and the laws He has given us. It requires that we act honourably, with love and justice, with due respect for God’s creation, with humility before the Divine mysteries we cannot understand, and with loyalty to the God’s People, the Jewish people and to those who have chosen to follow Christ, the cornerstone of the new generation children of God.

Jeshua, Jesus Christ, opened the gates to the Kingdom of God for the gentiles, the non-Jews who are willing to come close to God and to accept Him as their Most High Supreme Master of everything.

Together we all should come united, embarking on a pathway away from the societal and cultural forces that lead us to such vile behaviour. For far too long American Jews and Israeli Jews have been wittingly and unwittingly nurturing the forces that encourage extremism and fanaticism to flourish and wreak havoc. As well as in the Jewish culture as in the Christian culture we have seen the right wing groups or very conservative groups bringing more fundamentalist groups in the foreground and protecting. Though those fundamentalists, Jews and Christians do much more damage to the Jewish religion and Christian religion, than good.

We have to show the world that Israel, God’s Chosen people shall have to get its nation, but this in respect to other people living in the surroundings of the future capital of the Kingdom of God (Jerusalem). We do have to let others come to understand that it are not the religious and the faithful to God who are misusing the Word of God to get their own agenda of having more power.

We must be glad that we see changes in Israel itself. The marching and speaking out against the terror of “price tagging” and religious fanaticism in Israel is a good thing we should applaud. We should also let others know this. As lovers of God we also have to show the world that Israel is God’s nation and that we all should work to it that we can come to a peaceful region where the lovers of God shall be able to live in unity. That unity is important. It is a matter of spirit and openness to the differences between each believer. Often it is misunderstood that we all should think and act exactly the same or should all follow exactly the same and only one worldly organisation. But we should follow a heavenly organisation, the one of God. For us Christians Jeshua (Jesus Christ) is that cornerstone of that ‘Church‘. He is the one we should follow.

With our different opinions we should not be afraid to let those different opinions exist one next to the other. We also should know there are lots of things we do not yet understand, so we may have different ideas about it. But when we trust God we shall come to see that in the end He will give guidance and insight and everything shall become clear. We only now, need patience, and that we should bring up, in the love for each other.

When we are prepared to share our knowledge and bring forth some interesting ideas, others can become stimulated and also get inspired. We should give one light to the other so that every next one can start a chain of lights which shall become brighter in the darkness of this world.

Therefore do not hesitate to become a preacher in the name of Christ. Let your voice be heard. Share your thought with us and others.

You too can become a co-author on this platform. You too can become a voice bringing support for the faith in Christ and in God. You too can show others ways of life. You too can open others their eyes so that it would be easier for them to make choices. Only when we understand what is going around us, we shall be able to place ourselves in the whole picture and be able to make the right choices.

We should help each other to see better and to go together on the path prepared by the Messiah, the sent one from God.

Lets unite and put the hands together, helping each other to move forward.

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Preceding:

God’s wisdom for the believer brings peace

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Background reading:

  1. Genesis Among the Creation Myths
  2. Believing in God the Rewarder
  3. Jehovah steep rock and fortress, source of insight
  4. Creation of the earth and man #3 Of the Sabbath day #1 the Seventh day
  5. High Holidays not only for Israel
  6. Days of Nisan, Pesach, Pasach, Pascha and Easter
  7. On the Edge of Believing
  8. Counterfeit Gospels
  9. Bible in the first place #3/3
  10. About a man who changed history of humankind
  11. Entrance of a king to question our position #1 Coming in the Name of the Lord
  12. Marriage of Jesus 5 Papyrus fragment in Egyptian Coptic
  13. Marriage of Jesus 8 Wife of Yahweh
  14. Marriage of Jesus 9 Reason for a new marriage
  15. Marriage of Jesus 10 Old and New Covenant
  16. Trusting, Faith, Calling and Ascribing to Jehovah #10 Prayer #8 Condition
  17. Like grasshoppers
  18. Illuminating our minds and watching out
  19. The Best Bedtime Stories
  20. People are turning their back on Christianity
  21. Race, Skin colour and differences
  22. More looking for similarities
  23. Preparation for unity
  24. Wrong choices made to get rid of Assad
  25. Depression, Anxiety, Pressure and megachurches
  26. Stepping Toes 2014 in review
  27. Separation of church and state
  28. The sin of partiality
  29. Moving forward
  30. Remember there’s a light in the next day
  31. Structuur -structure
  32. A visible organisation on earth
  33. Looking for something or for the Truth and what it might be and self-awareness
  34. Not words of any organisation should bind you, but the Word of God
  35. To whom do we want to be enslaved Be enslaved to Christ
  36. Disciple of Christ counting lives and friends dear to them
  37. New Preaching Ideas website
  38. Bringing Good News into the world
  39. United people under Christ

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Further related articles:

  1. From Whom Should We Seek Counsel?
  2. The Messiah went to Many Places Teaching
  3. What will make us ready to preach the gospel
  4. How To Get Started In Sharing Your Faith As a Christian
  5. Preaching the Cross of Christ
  6. Quick Quotes: 25 Quotes from “Preaching” by Tim Keller
  7. Speech
  8. Why Being A Christian Isn’t Cool
  9. Stuff My Church Does I: Preaching
  10. Is Preaching Passé?
  11. The Art of Preaching
  12. What is preaching to me… and what it is for others.
  13. Preach the Word by Alistair Begg
  14. Preaching to the Reader
  15. 10 Years of Preaching, 10 Lessons: Lesson 1
  16. 10 Years of Preaching, 10 Lessons: Lesson 2
  17. Lessons Learned from 25 Years of Preaching (3)
  18. Life at the Church is Kinda Laid Back: How our Preaching Sounds to Newcomers
  19. The earnestness of preaching
  20. Tim Keller on the case for (usually) doing expository preaching
  21. Bulldozer spirituality
  22. Wisdom of Men or the Power of God – By Laurence Torr
  23. The Word of God – Christ, Scripture, Preaching
  24. The Gospel
  25. Transformation through God’s word!
  26. Bread of Life: Gospel according to Jesus, Martin Luther and Brene Brown
  27. Expository Preaching / Haddon Robinson 1.
  28. The purpose of preaching
  29. Preach Christ to sinners
  30. The Whole Counsel of God #563
  31. “Imitating other Believers in Judea” – 1 Thess 2:13-16 [Sermons on 1 Thessalonians, Week 8]
  32. 7 Ways for Men to help Women in Ministry
  33. The Hope of Leaving 1 Peter 1:13
  34. Eat Me, Speak Me
  35. Sermon Verses Motivational Talk
  36. Ending a Sermon on Time
  37. How to listen to sermons when it is the last thing I feel like doing
  38. More Than You Can Handle
  39. Confessions of an Idolatrous Preacher
  40. Topical Sermon vs Topical Series
  41. Preaching (Book Review)
  42. Catherine Booth Writes About Preaching
  43. Frank Pollard on Preaching
  44. Thunder Or Lightning?Preaching
  45. Street Preaching & Something the Devil Doesn’t Want You to Know
  46. Advice for Preachers
  47. Called Not to Preach
  48. Detroit Pastor Is Trying To Launch A “So You Think You Can Preach?” TV Show
  49. Ever had a sermon which totally flopped?
  50. Do you just sprinkle the Bible onto your sermons?
  51. For Preachers and Bible Teachers: Make Sure The Work Of The Scripture Is Completed In Your Own Hearts
  52. Are You Serving Slop In The Pulpit?
  53. Consider When Witnessing
  54. Preaching As The Plane Crashed
  55. Is This What You Face Whenever You Preach? You Should!
  56. Tim Keller’s Book on Preaching
  57. How to listen to character study sermons
  58. Sermon Post: For the Life of the World
  59. Winning Converts?
  60. Sow The Word
  61. Religion of Man; Is this the greatest lie that was ever told?
  62. The Great Duty of Family Religion – George Whitefield
  63. Devotion: Your Word, not my words
  64. Don’t Talk the Talk If You Don’t Walk the Walk
  65. Preaching As Expository Exultation
  66. Sermons That Do Not Just Settle For General Inspiration And Moralising (via Tim Keller)
  67. “Let’s Go Throw Rocks At The Campbellite Preacher!”
  68. Is Your Church–Or Are Your Sermons–A Waste Of Time?
  69. Still Nervous When You Speak In Front Of Others?
  70. Why do we Preach to People With Really Bad Memories?
  71. Why Should I Not Continue To Preach?
  72. Live that they might see
  73. Street Evangelism
  74. Is Evangelism for Everyone?
  75. Are You Afraid To Witness?
  76. Revolutionary Christianty
  77. As We Go Through the World
  78. Can You Help Me Become A Christian?
  79. Struggling with the Spiritual but not Religious.
  80. We are Agents for Expanding God’s Kingdom on Earth
  81. Teach children about God’s blessings
  82. Outreach On The Street Again
  83. Preaching Christ Is Not Enough
  84. Three Gifts God Gives Us to Conquer the Fear of Evangelism
  85. Would You Speak?
  86. God uses our work to put others in right relationship with Him. Makes sense!

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Filed under Activism and Peace Work, Announcement, Knowledge & Wisdom, Political affairs, Religious affairs