Autumn – by T.E. Hulme

A touch of cold in the Autumn night –
I walked abroad,
And saw the ruddy moon lean over a hedge
Like a red-faced farmer.
I did not stop to speak, but nodded,
And round about were the wistful stars
With white faces like town children.
~ T.E. Hulme

T.E. Hulme in 1912
Ed. note: Written in 1908, ‘Autumn’ by Thomas Ernest Hulme (1883-1917) English aesthetician, philosopher, literary critic, and poet, one of the founders of the Imagist movement and a major 20th-century literary influence.

Hulme posited that post-Renaissance humanism was coming to an end and believed that its view of man as without inherent limitations and imperfections was sentimental and based on false premises. His hatred of romantic optimism, his view of man as limited and absurd, his theology, which emphasized the doctrine of original sin, and his advocacy of a “hard, dry” kind of art and poetry foreshadowed the disillusionment of many writers of the 1920s. He advocated the “geometrical” art of Pablo Picasso and Wyndham Lewis as the potential expression of a new, more disciplined religious outlook. {Encyc Brit.}

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Filed under Being and Feeling, Nature, Pictures of the World, Poetry - Poems

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