Remembrance isn’t only about those who fought, but also those who refused

Too often is not seen or forgotten how much more important it would be not to take up the guns? Those who did not want to go to war are often considered as cowards, but more often they should be considered as lovers of man. Out of love for the other creations we should not kill any other creature of God without any serious reason, like killing plants and animals for food.

We also should remember those strong lads who out of their believe in God and love for their fellow man, did not want to take up weapons and kept speaking against war.
No war today can ever be justified. Other ways should be able to be found to find a solution for the ongoing conflict.

Also we should respect more those who went to the battle field but were confronted with such horror and pain that their life broke, and that they had to escape from that horror to be able to stay a human being and not becoming an animal only willing to kill anything on its way. Much more thought should be given to those courageous men who were fractured by war-violence and got shell shock and post-traumatic stress disorder.

+++

  • Old remedy provides new treatment for veterans with PTSD (kdvr.com)
    It’s an ancient remedy, that’s become a new option in treating Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, or PTSD.  Instead of prescription drugs, a Front Range clinic is taking a more holistic approach to helping local veterans.
    +
    Volunteers say their services decrease pain, anxiety and depression, alleviate symptoms of PTSD and improve sleep.  And it doesn’t just help veterans.

    “My son has had PTSD and had trouble getting back into society, and we all live in the same house, and at times it’s like walking on egg shells,” said Deborah Bailey.  Both she and her son receive treatment at the clinic.

  • PTSD: A Marine Corps Veteran’s Battle and Victory (accidentvictimsalliance.com)
    “We are on the cusp of a wave of PTSD,” says Dr. Sandro Galea after presenting a 300-page Congress-sanctioned report earlier this year suggesting the Pentagon and VA are unprepared for the impending wave of post traumatic stress disorder among troops.
  • Federal legislation ignores PTSD toll on civilians (eurekalert.org)
    Purtle found that in federal legislation introduced explicitly to address PTSD, an overwhelming majority of the language – more than 90 percent of the mentions of PTSD in these bills – showed efforts were targeted exclusively at military personnel. More than 90 percent of mentions of PTSD in the bills were likewise intended to address consequences of combat exposure.

    This emphasis does not match with the frequency of PTSD in the U.S. population.

    “Although trauma and PTSD are serious issues affecting military populations, the raw number of people affected by PTSD includes substantially more civilians simply because the civilian population is so much larger,” said Purtle.

  • New method shows progress for veteran PTSD sufferers (peoplestrusttoronto.wordpress.com)
    They fight the enemy and witness death and destruction before returning home. But sadly, the mental effects of war don’t go away for many veterans who suffer from post traumatic stress disorder.

    Vía Veterans Today http://www.veteranstoday.com/2014/10/31/new-method-shows-progress-for-veteran-ptsd-sufferers/

  • Scots children as young as five blighted by post-traumatic stress disorder after suffering abuse or witnessing catastrophic events (dailyrecord.co.uk)
    “Acute external events such as accidents and natural disasters, a range of violence-related traumas such as domestic or community violence or abuse can cause this condition.

    “It is certainly more recognised now because of a higher awareness of PTSD.”

    Statistics from health boards who responded to our freedom of information requests for PTSD cases recorded in children since 2010 make grim reading.

    Children in Greater Glasgow, Lothian and Grampian are suffering the same psychological trauma seen in kids in war-torn Gaza.

    More than half of 15 to 18-year-olds in Gaza show signs of full or partial post-traumatic stress disorder after seeing dead bodies and witnessing heavy shelling.

    In Glasgow, two children aged under 10, 21 aged 11 to 15 and 15 aged 16 to 18 were found to have PTSD.

    In Grampian, nine children were diagnosed in 2010, eight in 2011 and 17 in 2012-13.

  • Doctor who treated Siegfried Sasson ‘pioneered’ anthropology (theguardian.com)
    William Rivers, the doctor who treated officers including Siegfried Sassoon for shell shock during the first world war, and who was memorably brought to life in Pat Barker’s Booker prize-winning Regeneration trilogy, was also one of the fathers of social anthropology, according to a new book which claims his work in the field was written out of history by subsequent academics.

    Rivers is best known for his work at Craiglockhart war hospital in 1917, where he treated soldiers including Sassoon and Wilfred Owen for the condition then known as shell shock, now referred to as post-traumatic stress disorder. Rivers pioneered a humane, “talking cure” for the soldiers, as opposed to electric-shock treatment.

  • Jailed Marine released (wgntv.com)
    Tahmooressi was staying in San Diego to get treatment for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder after serving two tours of duty in Afghanistan.

Stop Making Sense

RAF Veteran Harry Leslie Smith writes for The Guardian:

‘As an RAF veteran of the second world war I know that November is a cruel month for both remembering and forgetting the cost of armed conflict. During these past few days when the light grows dim, I have stumbled around London and remembered a time when, as a young man, I witnessed our capital face death from swarms of Nazi bomber planes.

In this day and age we like to impose uniformity on our past conflicts. We see them through a nostalgic lens of wartime propaganda films in which the hero gladly sacrifices his life for a green and pleasant land. But the past is not as simple or as clear-cut as our TV presenters like to suggest during Remembrance Sunday services. For every act of unique heroism we remember, we often forget or ignore all those who, because of…

View original post 94 more words

5 Comments

Filed under Activism and Peace Work, Being and Feeling, Health affairs, Re-Blogs and Great Blogs, Religious affairs, Social affairs, World affairs

5 responses to “Remembrance isn’t only about those who fought, but also those who refused

  1. Pingback: July 4, 1916 – Battle of the Somme greeted with ‘the greatest enthusiasm’ | From guestwriters

  2. Pingback: The Great War changed everything | Marcus Ampe's Space

  3. Pingback: The War to end all wars | From guestwriters

  4. Pingback: Why are we killing? | From guestwriters

  5. Pingback: Anatomy of a World War I Artillery Barrage | Marcus Ampe's Space

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s