How our governments use military charities to evade the real cost of their wars

More people should be aware of the war-machine and how governmental institutions take care enough funds may be found to ‘lard’ the fighting business.

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To remember:

the British public will fill collecting tins for armed forces personnel.

The Charities Directory lists 276 army, 188 Royal Marines and Navy, 70 RAF and 90 ex-services (military) charities in the UK

the biggest profile with ‘Help for Heroes’.

Almost all of these charities have come into existence since 1999, the majority in the past decade.

charities to take care of soldiers after their return

responsibility, rehabilitation and care would be provided and compensation would be paid > something that the government should take responsibility for.

Looking into some of the service personnel relief charities, their relationship to the Ministry of Defence (MoD) certainly raise some questions.

Help for Heroes & Skill Force, MoD project to get ex-forces personnel into work or for new treatment centres.

obligations that society and government have to armed forces personnel “The Armed Forces Covenant.”

£37 billion annual defence spending this government cares little for the welfare of its armed forces personnel.

British public want veterans to be better supported > troubling they keep blindly giving to charity without thought for what service personnel need.

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Stop Making Sense

Sam Walton writes for Ceasefire Magazine:

The names of 600,000 soldiers are engraved in alphabetical order at the The Ring of Memory international memorial, in Notre Dame de Lorette, France. (Credits: AFP)Say one thing about the British public, we will fill collecting tins for armed forces personnel. The Charities Directory lists 276 army, 188 Royal Marines and Navy, 70 RAF and 90 ex-services (military) charities in the UK, and those numbers are growing every year. The Royal British Legion is by far the biggest in terms of income, with over £100m in turnover, and shares the biggest profile with ‘Help for Heroes’. Almost all of these charities have come into existence since 1999, the majority in the past decade.

However, is the government avoiding the full cost of going to war by getting these charities to take care of soldiers after their return? If a fire-fighter, nurse or other government employee was killed or seriously injured in an industrial accident at work, the government would assume responsibility, rehabilitation and care would be provided and compensation…

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