Birds’ Eye

What we see if we flew?
Would we see lines as rivers?
Would we see people and animals?
Would there be details to the mountains, rivers and streams?

I say that we can fly.
And we will see what we want to see.
Just close your eyes and let your mind wander.
You will see what you would see from a birds’ eye view.

– Daphne Osman
A young girl still in school. She has always dreamed of seeing her work on the internet.
Sunset Over Pacific

Sunset Over Pacific (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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  • More Costa Rican birds, and moths (dearkitty1.wordpress.com)
    time to switch from telephoto lens to macro lens. From birds to moths which had gathered on the building.
  • Food for Thought-Birds of Caution (richardsfoodforthought.com)

    Birds of caution
    Never fly
    Dreams of motion
    Make them sigh

    Content to watch
    From their place
    While others seek
    Open space

  • Eagles Wings (1realgirlwriter.com)
    I met a girl in a lake today
    On her arm was inked a tattoo
    It was an image of a bird of prey
    An eagle proud and trueThis girl thought she had clipped its wings
    Because she did not fly
    The sky was bright and crystal blue
    But yet she choose to hide
  • Urban river pollutants suppress wild bird development (sciencedaily.com)
    Hormone disrupting pollutants are affecting the health and development of wild birds nesting along the urban rivers of South Wales, new research shows. Findings reveal that chicks of the Eurasian Dipper — a river bird that feeds exclusively on insects and fish in upland streams — are underweight compared to their rural counterparts. Also of concern is that birds nesting in urban rivers have altered hormone levels, and are hatching fewer female chicks than those nesting along rural rivers, which could have negative implications for the population’s breeding and survival.
  • Nijhum Dwip – The quite island of Bangladesh (remit2homeblog.wordpress.com)
    The virgin island of “Nijhum Dwip” is enriched with plants, animals and natural beauty. It is raised on the estuary on the channel of the Meghna River on the mouth of the mighty Bay of Bengal. The geographical location of Nijhum Dwip has been identified just two kilometres south west of Hatia Upazila and directed under the jurisdiction of the Noakhali District of Bangladesh. Nijhum Dwip consists of more than 4 / 5 small islands like Char Kamla, Char Osman, Corner of Char Osman and isolated from the mainland by Hatia channel.
  • Birds above us (fortiscorde.wordpress.com)
    I decided to safely jot down lines of poetry . . . *winks deviously* . . . while I innocently appeared to be taking notes. But sketching has always been my means of absorbing and staying focused. So that I wouldn’t fall asleep in the middle of class (even if it was one of my favorite classes at the school: Paideia).
  • Until Bird-racketing Dawn (seshatwuji.wordpress.com)
    Though aging does that just fine
    Our wings of where we
    Once flew, the sunlit open skies
    And when red breaks out
  • Rare bird spotted near Pelee sparks buzz in birding community (blogs.windsorstar.com)
    According to the National Audobon Society, the Smith’s Longspur is a sparrow-sized bird with distinctive buff-coloured marking that winters in the plains territory from Nebraska south to Texas, and congregates en Masse in Illinois before migrating north to the treeline in Canada.If the birds are spotted here repeatedly over a period of time, they could attract birders from further afield, Pratt said.

    “Despite thousands of birders birding Pelee every year for a hundred years or more, they’ve never had one before in the county here,” said Pratt.

  • Wild Bird Development Suppressed by Urban River Pollutants (medindia.net)
    Findings published today in the Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry journal reveal that chicks of the Eurasian Dipper – a river bird that feeds exclusively on insects and fish in upland streams – are underweight compared to their rural counterparts. Also of concern is that birds nesting in urban rivers have altered hormone levels, and are hatching fewer female chicks than those nesting along rural rivers, which could have negative implications for the population’s breeding and survival.Data obtained by a team of scientists from Cardiff University, working in collaboration with the Universities of Saskatchewan and Exeter, and the Natural Environment Research Council, suggest that urban contaminants such as PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) and PBDE flame-retardant chemicals (polybrominated diphenyl ethers) acquired through their food are to blame. Results showed a strong correlation between contamination by PBDEs and PCBs with depressed thyroid hormone levels in chicks – one thyroid hormone was 43% lower in chicks from urban rivers than those rural rivers.
  • Erich Hoyt and the Orca Tour; the endangered song: The Animal Beat (oregonlive.com)
    Sad news comes this month from Ecuador, where a young Andean condor released to the wild last summer was found shot dead. The bird had been equipped with a satellite transmitter, which allowed researchers the rare opportunity to track flight patterns and previously unknown roosting sites, according to The Peregrine Fund, a Boise conservation group. The bird, known as Felipe, was the fourth Andean condor shot and killed in Ecuador in the last 18 months. Andean condors, a critically endangered species in Eucuador, are that country’s national bird. Federal authorities are investigating.
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2 Comments

Filed under Nature, Poetry - Poems

2 responses to “Birds’ Eye

  1. Pingback: A bird’s eye and reflecting from within | From guestwriters

  2. Pingback: Beauty (and science) in the small things | Stepping Toes

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